One of America’s Favorites – Poached Egg

May 6, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A poached egg in a Salad Niçoise

A poached egg is an egg that has been cooked, outside the shell, by poaching (or sometimes steaming), as opposed to simmering or boiling liquid.

This method of preparation is favored for eggs, as it can yield more delicately cooked eggs than cooking at higher temperatures such as with boiling water.

The egg is cracked into a cup or bowl of any size, and then gently slid into a pan of water at approximately 75 Celsius (167 °F) and cooked until the egg white has mostly solidified, but the yolk remains soft. The “perfect” poached egg has a runny yolk, with a hardening crust and no raw white remaining.

Broken into water at the poaching temperature, the white will cling to the yolk, resulting in cooked egg white and runny yolk.

Any given chicken egg contains some egg white that is prone to dispersing into the poaching liquid and cooking into an undesirable foam. To prevent this, the egg can be strained beforehand to remove the thinner component of the egg white. A small amount of vinegar may also be added to the water, as its acidic qualities accelerate the poaching process. Stirring the water vigorously to create a vortex may also reduce dispersion.

A single broken poached egg on 2 pieces of toast

The term “poaching” is used for this method but is actually incorrect. The egg is placed in a cup and suspended over simmering water, using a special pan called an “egg-poacher”. This is usually a wide-bottomed pan with an inner lid, with holes containing a number of circular cups that each hold one egg, with an additional lid over the top. To cook, the pan is filled with water and brought to a simmer, or a gentle boil. The outer lid holds in the steam, ensuring that the heat surrounds the egg completely. The cups are often lubricated with butter in order to effect easy removal of the cooked egg, although non-stick egg poachers are also available.

The result is very similar to the traditional coddled egg, although these steamed eggs are often cooked for longer, and hence are firmer. Eggs so prepared are often served on buttered toast.

Poached eggs are used in the traditional American breakfast/brunch dish Eggs Benedict.

Poached eggs are the basis for many dishes in Louisiana Creole cuisine, such as Eggs Sardou, Eggs Portuguese, Eggs Hussarde and Eggs St. Charles. Creole poached egg dishes are typically served for brunches.

Eggs Benedict, a dish often served for breakfast or brunch.

Several cuisines include eggs poached in soup or broth and served in the soup. In parts of central Colombia, for instance, a popular breakfast item is eggs poached in a scallion/coriander broth with milk, known as changua or simply caldo de huevo (“egg soup”).

The North African dish shakshouka consists of eggs poached in a spicy tomato sauce.

In Italy poached eggs are typically seasoned with grated parmigiano reggiano and butter (or olive oil).

In Korean cuisine, poached eggs are known as suran (수란) and is topped with variety of garnishes such as chili threads, rock tripe threads, and scallion threads.

Turkish dish çılbır consists of poached eggs, yogurt sauce with garlic and butter with red peppers.

In India, fried eggs are most commonly called “poached,” but are sometimes also known as bullseyes, as a reference to “bullseye” targets, or “half-boil” in Southern India, indicating that they are partly cooked. These eggs are “poached” in name only and so do not share the same preparation method as poached eggs in other countries.

 

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Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 20, 2017 at 5:25 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Scallops……..

 

When buying Scallops – Buy Scallops that are a creamy ivory; coral, if attached, should be bright orange. If they are too white, they may have been soaked in water to increase the weight.

Asian Food Fest 2017 will take place on May 13th & 14th at Washington Park! – Cincinnati, Ohio

May 12, 2017 at 8:30 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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Asian Food Fest

Features authentic food from mostly all countries from Asian including Vietnam, Philippines, Malaysia, India, Korea, Japan and many more. Chef Hideki Harada and his wife will be serving up some Japanese delights while Pho Lang Thang will be going back to it’s roots of the first food fest and will be dishing out some Pho! These are only a small portion of the food in store this year.

Along with food, this year’s festival will feature Human Foosball Arena where all will be able to hop into the inflatable life sized foosball arena and have some fun. There will also be Asian beer, cultural dances and vocalists, and Asian inspired arts and crafts. AFF will be family and dog friendly with Washington Park’s interactive water park, playground, and dog park open for all of our guests.

Asian Food Fest’s mission is to help make Cincinnati a more diverse, accepting, and delicious city. We aim to promote diversity in the Greater Cincinnati area by celebrating Asian food, culture, and communities, while working to encourage even more local people to be a part of the growing Asian food scene.

Asian Food Fest’s vision is to become one of Cincinnati’s premiere cultural festivals and one of the largest Asian cultural festivals in the Midwest, through strong partnerships with many local businesses and community organizations. Through Asian Food Fest, we hope to build on the exciting growth and creativity taking place in the Asian culinary community to make Cincinnati a cultural and culinary destination for Asian food lovers.

Where We’re Located
WASHINGTON PARK
1230 Elm St.
Cincinnati, OH 45202

Dates and Times
Sat, May 13
12:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Sun, May 14
12:00 pm to 9:00 pm
http://www.asianfoodfest.org/

Steamed Fish on Rice

May 12, 2015 at 5:45 AM | Posted in fish, rice | Leave a comment
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Here’s an excellent Fish and Rice Dish from the CooksRecipes, Steamed Fish on Rice. If your looking for any type of recipe, just check out the CooksRecipes website! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

* The recipe calls for Halibut but you could also use Sea Bass, Tilapia, or Flounder.
Steamed Fish on Rice

Recipe Ingredients:

1 1/2 pounds fresh halibut fillets or steaksCooksrecipes 2
1 (2-inch) piece fresh gingerroot, julienned
3 green onions, julienned
1 tablespoon soy sauce
4 tablespoons rice wine (Sake)
2 cups cooked rice
1 lemon for garnish
Green onions strips for garnish

 

Cooking Directions:

1 – Place fillets in a shallow dish, cover with green onion and ginger. Combine liquid ingredients and pour over fish. Marinate fish for 10 minutes.
2 – To Steam Fish: Use a bamboo or metal steamer. Set steamer rack over boiling water. Water should not touch the rack. Place fillets on a plate and set on the rack. Pour remaining marinade over fish, cover and steam 10 minutes per inch thickness of fish. (No need to turn fish during cooking.) Fish is done when flesh turns opaque and flakes easily with a fork.
3 – Before serving, pack 1/2 cup measure with cooked rice and turn out on individual dinner plates. Gently flatten the mound with the back of a spoon to form a round pillow shape.
4 – Serve the steamed fish on the rice pillows, pour hot marinade liquid over each fillet. Garnish with a slice of lemon and green onion strips.
Makes 4 servings.

 

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/seafood/steamed_fish_on_rice_recipe.html

Low-Calorie Portion-Controlled Recipes

July 6, 2014 at 5:29 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Here’s some tips and recipes for Low-Calorie Portion-Controlled Recipes. It’s from the EatingWell website.

 

Low-Calorie Portion-Controlled RecipesEatingWell2

Perfectly sized low-calorie recipes to help you stay slim.
Being mindful of portions is important; even overeating healthy foods can lead to weight gain. These recipes do all the work for you and make portion-controlled servings of your favorite dishes. From frittatas with Brussels sprouts to smoothies made with chocolate and bananas, these perfectly sized foods will keep your taste buds and your waistline happy.

 
Individual Brussels Sprout & Potato Frittatas
Brussels sprouts and preshredded potatoes make these oversized muffin-shaped frittatas hearty. They’re as good served warm for dinner as they are at room temperature for lunch. Pair with a mixed green salad with cherry tomatoes and buttermilk dressing…..

 
Tutti-Frutti Muesli
Muesli mixed with yogurt and fruit packs in the nutrition and satisfies all morning long….

 
Banana-Cocoa Soy Smoothie
With plenty of protein from both tofu and soymilk, this banana-split-inspired breakfast smoothie will keep you satisfied until lunchtime…..

 
* Click the link below to get all the Low-Calorie Portion-Controlled Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/low_calorie_portion_controlled_recipes?sssdmh=dm17.744420&utm_source=EWDNL&esrc=nwewd062314t

Seafood of the Week – Steamed Clams

May 13, 2014 at 5:48 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | 4 Comments
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Steamed clams

Steamed clams

Steamed clams is a seafood dish consisting of various types and preparations of clam which are cooked by steaming according to local custom in various countries.

In the United States the dish is commonly prepared with a kind of shellfish called steamers, a somewhat generic name that usually refers to a small soft-shell clam harvested and served along the East Coast and in New England. Steamers are so named because of the way are most often prepared.

Hard shell clams, sometimes known as quahogs, can also be steamed. They are categorized by size— the smaller ones are called littlenecks, medium-sized ones topnecks, and the larger ones cherrystones.

The clams used for steaming are usually cooked live. If in a hard shell, the clam should be closed when purchased and should open after being cooked. Soft shell clams are open slightly (agape) while alive. Larger chowder clams are not typically used for steaming.

 

 

 
Clams are steamed according to many different recipes in different regions. In China, steamed clams can be served with eggs. In Thailand steamed clams are served with lemongrass, ginger, or herbs. In France they are often cooked with white wine, onion, garlic, shallots, and butter. A huge plate of steamed clams in Restaurant el Club in San Felipe, Mexico, costs 45 pesos, according to a 2007 travel guide. Steamed clams are also eaten in Japan (“Oosari” are large steamed clams), and many other countries with large coastlines.

The New England clam bake is a traditional preparation that includes clams layered with other ingredients such as corn, lobster, mussels, crabs, potatoes, and onions in a metal bucket. The layers are separated by seaweed and steamed over a fire outdoors and served family style as at a picnic.

To prepare steamed clams, live clams are rinsed carefully to remove sand and grit and then cooked in a large kettle of water with salt added. They are served with broth and melted butter for dipping. Lemon juice, beer, garlic, shallots, parsley, and wine are sometimes used for flavoring and to season the broth.

Steamers can be held by the siphon or “neck” when eaten. The covering of black skin is pulled away and removed as the clams are ingested.

Steamers may be served simply. In the open shell the clam is given a few quick dips in broth to remove any lingering sand before being dipped in melted butter and eaten.

 

 

 
In Florida, a couple were halfway through a $10 plate of steamed clams when they found a rare, iridescent purple pearl estimated to be worth thousands of dollars.

 

 

 

Dish of steamers

Dish of steamers

Steamers are praised by many chefs, for instance Jacques Pépin: “Plentiful and inexpensive during the summer, especially in the Northeast, steamers are one of the great treats of the season.” They are found in shallow waters from the Arctic Ocean to North Carolina, and have been found in Florida and Europe. They can be dug up by amateur clam diggers. Steamers have been transplanted to the West Coast and are available from San Francisco to Vancouver, Canada. They are sold in tanks and can also be shipped directly to consumers, but their shells sometimes get cracked.

 

 

 

 

 

Portuguese Steamed Clams

 

INGREDIENTS:
5 pounds clams in shell, scrubbed
1 1/2 pounds chorizo, sliced into chunks
1 small onion, cut into thin wedges
1 (14.5 ounce) can diced tomatoes
2 cups white wine
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
DIRECTIONS:
1. Wash clams well in a sink of cold water. Discard any clams that are already opened.
2. In a large stock pot with a tight fitting lid, place the cleaned clams. Add the sausage, onion, tomatoes and wine. Cover and set over high heat. Steam until all the clams open up. Be sure to shake the pan often to insure even heat.
3. Drizzle olive oil over the cooked clams. Evenly divide all the ingredients into warm soup plates. Divide the broth into side cups for dipping.

 

Cooking Light With Seafood

December 7, 2013 at 10:36 AM | Posted in seafood | 2 Comments
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Excellent article and some delicious sounding recipes from the NY Times web site. The link is at the end of the post.

 
Cooking Light With Seafood
By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN

 

 

Many of you, still full from Thanksgiving, may be anticipating holiday parties to come and wondering how to balance things out with some of the meals in between. With this in mind, I decided to work on light fish and seafood dinners for this week’s Recipes for Health. They should provide you with a respite from rich food during this shortened window between Thanksgiving and Christmas.

I bought several fillets of Alaskan cod knowing that the Alaskan state fisheries use sustainable practices. Cod is a very mild tasting fish that has a fairly firm texture. I oven steamed the fillets using the same technique I use for salmon and made three different sauces to serve with the fish. Oven steaming worked beautifully. I love using this cooking method because you don’t need any extra oil, except to oil the foil on your baking sheet, and you won’t be left with lingering odors of fried fish in your kitchen. It is a very forgiving method for preparing fish and lends itself to do-ahead cooking.

In addition to the cod with sauces, I made a refreshing and satisfying ceviche and I also bought some clams, which I steamed and served with a spicy tomato sauce. …..

 

 

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/06/cooking-light-with-seafood/?_r=0

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