Seafood of the Week – Cioppino

May 20, 2014 at 5:26 AM | Posted in fish, seafood, Seafood of the Week | 1 Comment
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Cioppino

Cioppino

Cioppino is a fish stew originating in San Francisco. It is considered an Italian-American dish, and is related to various regional fish soups and stews of Italian cuisine

 

 
Cioppino is traditionally made from the catch of the day, which in the dish’s place of origin is typically a combination of dungeness crab, clams, shrimp, scallops, squid, mussels and fish. The seafood is then combined with fresh tomatoes in a wine sauce, and served with toasted bread, either sourdough or baguette. The dish is comparable to cacciucco and brodetto from Italy, as well as other fish dishes from the Mediterranean region such as bouillabaisse, buridda, and bourride of the French Provence, and suquet de peix from Catalan speaking regions of coastal Spain.

 

 

 

 

Cioppino was developed in San Francisco, California in the late 1800s by the famed Italian fish wholesaler Achille Paladini, (later titled “The Fish King”) who settled in the North Beach section of the city, he came from the seaport town of Ancona, Italy in 1865. He originally made it when the boats came back from sea and the ‘left overs’ were used to make a fish stew, a few Dungeness Crabs were also added. It eventually became a staple as Italian restaurants proliferated in San Francisco.

The name comes from ciuppin, a word in the Ligurian dialect of the port city of Genoa, meaning “to chop” or “chopped” which described the process of making the stew by chopping up various ‘left overs’ of the day’s catch. Ciuppin is also a classic soup of Genoa, similar in flavor to cioppino, with less tomato, and the seafood cooked to the point that it falls apart.

 

 
Generally the seafood is cooked in broth and served in the shell, including the crab (if any) that is often served halved or quartered. It therefore requires special utensils, typically a crab fork and cracker. Depending on the restaurant, it may be accompanied by a bib to prevent food stains on clothing (sometimes encouraged by restaurants for patrons to use as a sign to attract attention to the restaurant’s food), a damp napkin, or a second bowl for the shells. A variation, the “lazy man’s” cioppino, is served with seafood shelled and crab legs cracked.

 

 

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Seafood of the Week – Squid

March 18, 2014 at 6:49 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | 2 Comments
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Fried calamares

Fried calamares

Squid is a popular food in many parts of the world.
In many of the languages around the Mediterranean sea, squid are referred to by a term related to the Italian “calamari” (singular “calamaro”), which in English has become a culinary name for Mediterranean dishes involving squid, especially fried squid (fried calamari).

 

 

 
Fried squid (fried calamari, calamari) is a dish in Mediterranean cuisine. It consists of batter-coated, deep fried squid, fried for less than two minutes to prevent toughness. It is served plain, with salt and lemon on the side.
In North America, it is a staple in seafood restaurants. It is served as an appetizer, garnished with parsley, or sprinkled with parmesan cheese. It is served with dips: peppercorn mayonnaise, tzatziki, or in the United States, marinara sauce, tartar sauce, or cocktail sauce. In Mexico it is served with Tabasco sauce or habanero. Other dips, such as ketchup, aioli, and olive oil are used. In Turkey it is served with tarator sauce. Like many seafood dishes, it may be served with a slice of lemon.
In South Africa, Australia and New Zealand fried calamari is popular in fish and chip shops; imitation calamari of white fish may also be used. When offered for sale as whole fresh animals, the term Calamari should only be used to describe the Northern and Southern Calamari (Sepioteuthis spp.), however once prepared as food it is common to apply the term calamari to any squid species and even cuttlefish.

 

 

 

Karaage of squid legs from Japan

Karaage of squid legs from Japan

Squid preparation

The body (mantle) can be stuffed whole, cut into flat pieces or sliced into rings. The arms, tentacles and ink are edible; the only parts of the squid that are not eaten are its beak and gladius (pen).

 

* In Spain and Italy, squid or cuttlefish ink is eaten in dishes such as paella, risotto, soups and pasta.
* In Portugal lulas are commonly eaten grilled whole, in kebabs of squid rings with bell peppers and onion (“Espetadas”) or stewed. Also stuffed with minced meat and stewed (“Lulas Recheadas”). The battered version is known as ‘lulas a sevilhana’, named after Seville, the Andalusian city that popularised the dish.
*In Sardinia, squid have a sauce made from lemon, garlic, parsley, and olive oil.
* In Italy, Greece, Spain, Egypt, Cyprus, Albania and Turkey, squid rings and arms are coated in batter and fried in oil. Other recipes from these regions feature squid (or octopus) simmered slowly, with vegetables such as squash or tomato. When frying, the squid flesh is kept tender by short cooking time. When simmering, the flesh is most tender when cooking is prolonged with reduced temperature.
* In Malta klamar mimli involves stuffing the squid with rice, breadcrumbs, parsley, garlic and capers and then gently stewing in red wine.
* In Spain, (Rabas or Calamares a la romana, battered calamari, lit. Roman-style calamari) has the calamari rings covered in a thick batter, deep fried, and with lemon juice and mayonnaise or garlic mayonnaise. Squid stewed in its own black ink is (Calamares en su tinta). Battered and fried baby squid is (Puntillitas).
* In northern Spain, squid is cooked in its own ink (“Calamares” or “Chipirones en su tinta”), resulting a black stew-like dish in which squid meat is very tender and is accompanied by a thick black sauce usually made with onion, tomato, squid ink, among others.
* In the Philippines, squid is cooked as adobong pusit, squid in adobo sauce, along with the ink, imparting a tangy flavour, especially with fresh chillies. Battered squid is served with alioli, mayonnaise or chilli vinegar. Squid is grilled on coals, brushed with a soy sauce-based marinade, and stuffed with a tomato and onions. More elaborate stuffed squid is “rellenong pusit”, stuffed with finely chopped vegetables, squid fat, and ground pork.
* In Korea, squid is sometimes killed and served quickly. Unlike octopus, squid tentacles do not usually continue to move when reaching the table. The squid is served with Korean mustard, soy sauce, chili sauce, or sesame sauce. It is salted and wrapped in lettuce or pillard leaves. Squid is also marinated in hot pepper sauce and cooked on a pan (Nakji Bokum or Ojingeo Bokum). They are also served in food stand as snack food, battered and deep fried or grilled using hot skillet. They are also cut up into small pieces to be added into HaeMulPaJeon (Korean Seafood Pizza) or variety of spicy seafood soup. Dried squid may also accompany alcoholic beverages as anju. Dried squid is served with peanuts. Squid is roasted with hot pepper paste or mayonnaise as a dip. Steamed squid and boiled squid are delicacies. Squid is also used for Soondae (Korean Noodle Sausage) as a casing to hold in rice and noodle.
* In Slovenia squid are eaten grilled and stuffed with pršut and cheese, with blitva (Swiss chard).
* In Chinese and Southeast Asian cuisine, squid is used in stir-fries, rice, and noodle dishes. It may be heavily spiced.
* In China, Thailand, Japan and Taiwan, squid is grilled whole and sold in food stalls.
Pre-packaged dried shredded squid or cuttlefish are snack items in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, China, Russia, often shredded to reduce chewiness.
* In Russia, a lightly boiled julienned squid with onion rings, garnished with mayonnaise, makes a salad. Another dish is a squidstuffed with rice and vegetables and then roasted. Squid is a sushi, sashimi and tempura item.

Cantabrian Rabas - deep fried squid body rings and tentacles

Cantabrian Rabas – deep fried squid body rings and tentacles

 

* In Japan and Korea, squid (usually sparkling enope (firefly) squid or spear squid) is made into shiokara (in Japanese) or jeotgal (in Korean). Heavily salted squid, sometimes with innards, ferments for as long as a month, and is preserved in small jars. This salty, strong flavored item is served in small quantities as banchan, or as an accompaniment to white rice or alcoholic beverages.
* In Iran squid is baked in date and water and since it fried in onion, tomato Puree, salt, pepper, garlic, cinnamon, turmeric, and some endemic vegetables.
* In India and Sri Lanka, squid or cuttlefish is eaten in coastal areas for example, in Kerala and Tamil Nadu. Squid are eaten deep fried (Koonthal Fry) or as squid gravy (koonthal varattiyathu/Roast). In Kerala and Tamil Nadu, squid are called koonthal, kanava or kadamba.
* In the United States, in an attempt to popularize squid as a protein source in the 1970s, researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology developed a squid-gutting machine, and submitted squid cocktail, rings, and chowder to a 70-person tasting panel for market research. Despite a general lack of popularity of squid in the United States, aside from the internal “ethnic market”, polling had shown a negative public perception of squid foods, the tasting panel gave the dishes “high marks”.

 

 

Seafood of the Week – Squid

December 10, 2013 at 10:07 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | Leave a comment
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European squid

European squid

 

Squid are cephalopods of the order Teuthida, which comprises around 300 species. Like all other cephalopods, squid have a distinct head, bilateral symmetry, a mantle, and arms. Squid, like cuttlefish, have eight arms arranged in pairs and two, usually longer, tentacles. Squid are strong swimmers and certain species can “fly” for short distances out of the water.

 

 

 

Squid have differentiated from their ancestral molluscs such that the body plan has been condensed antero-posteriorly and extended dorso-ventrally. What before may have been the foot of the ancestor is modified into a complex set of tentacles and highly developed sense organs, including advanced eyes similar to those of vertebrates.
The ancestral shell has been lost, with only an internal gladius, or pen, remaining. The pen is a feather-shaped internal structure that supports the squid’s mantle and serves as a site for muscle attachment. It is made of a chitin-like material.

 

 

 

The main body mass is enclosed in the mantle, which has a swimming fin along each side. These fins, unlike in other marine organisms, are not the main source of locomotion in most species.
The skin is covered in chromatophores, which enable the squid to change color to suit its surroundings, making it practically invisible. The underside is also almost always lighter than the topside, to provide camouflage from both prey and predator.
Under the body are openings to the mantle cavity, which contains the gills (ctenidia) and openings to the excretory and reproductive systems. At the front of the mantle cavity lies the siphon, which the squid uses for locomotion via precise jet propulsion. In this form of locomotion, water is sucked into the mantle cavity and expelled out of the siphon in a fast, strong jet. The direction of the siphon can be changed, to suit the direction of travel.
Inside the mantle cavity, beyond the siphon, lies the visceral mass, which is covered by a thin, membranous epidermis. Under this are all the major internal organs.

 

 

 

The majority are no more than 60 cm (24 in) long, although the giant squid may reach 13 metres (43 ft).
In 1978, sharp, curved claws on the suction cups of squid tentacles cut up the rubber coating on the hull of the USS Stein. The size suggested the largest squid known at the time.
In 2003, a large specimen of an abundant[10] but poorly understood species, Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni (the colossal squid), was discovered. This species may grow to 14 m (46 ft) in length, making it the largest invertebrate. Squid have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom. The kraken is a legendary tentacled monster possibly based on sightings of real giant squid.
In February 2007, a New Zealand fishing vessel caught a colossal squid weighing 495 kg (1,091 lb) and measuring around 10 m (33 ft) off the coast of Antarctica. This specimen represents the largest cephalopod to ever be scientifically documented.

 

 

 

According to the FAO, the cephalopod catch for 2002 was 3,173,272 tonnes (6.995867×109 lb). Of this, 2,189,206 tons, or 75.8 percent, was squid. The following table lists the squid species fishery catches which exceeded 10,000 tonnes (22,000,000 lb) in 2002.

 

 

Fried calamari: breaded, deep-fried squid

Fried calamari: breaded, deep-fried squid

 

Many species are popular as food in cuisines as diverse as Chinese, Greek, Turkish, English, American, Japanese, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Korean, Vietnamese, and Filipino.
In English-speaking countries, squid as food is often marketed using the Italian word calamari. Squid are found abundantly in certain areas, and provide large catches for fisheries. The body can be stuffed whole, cut into flat pieces, or sliced into rings. The arms, tentacles, and ink are also edible; in fact, the only parts not eaten are the beak and gladius (pen). Squid is a good food source for zinc and manganese, and high in copper, selenium, vitamin B12, and riboflavin.

 

Marinated Calamari
Ingredients:

Extra Virgin Olive Oil
4 medium Squid, use the hoods sliced into rings
1 cup 2% Milk
1 Garlic Cloves or 1 use bottled Minced Garlic
1 pinch Sea Salt
1 pinch Ground Black Pepper
1 pinch Smoked Paprika
1/2 cup Flour

 

Directions:

1 Slcie the squid into rings and place in a small mixing bowl.
2 Cover the squid with milk (use more or less as required. Add garlic and season with salt, pepper, and paprika. Cover and refrigerate for 24 hours (or at least overnight).
3 Drain the calamari and discard the milk. Pat dry with kitchen paper.
4 Toss calamari in flour. I use a large plastic bag to do this.
5 Deep fry until golden. Serve hot.
6 Do not overcook the calamari as it may toughen.
7 NOTE: Cooking time does not include overnight marination time.

Warning Shoppers You Are Entering The Jungle Zone!

October 17, 2012 at 12:48 PM | Posted in cooking, Food | 3 Comments
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Spent the early morning at Jungle Jim’s Market where “Shopping is an Adventure!” I love going to this place! You can find almost any

The Entrance to Jungle Jim’s

item your looking for here, ANYTHING! I took along my camera with me just to show you around a bit. I left with 2 packages of fresh boiled Lobster Claws, Squid, Cheese, and plenty of Produce!
Discover a World of Food and More!

Jungle Jim’s International Market is more than a grocery store, it’s a destination! With more than 200,000 square feet of shopping space in each of our stores, there are over 150,000 products from which to choose.

In addition to all the grocery items, you’ll find store tours, food demonstrations and lots of fun and attractions for the whole family.

Our stores also offer more gift shops, boutiques, restaurants and conveniences than any other mega store in the region. Stop in for an hour or make a day of it. However you do it, shopping at Jungle Jim’s is an experience you won’t forget!

http://www.junglejims.com/

 

Still need a Pumpkin?

Still need a Pumpkin?

 

 

fresh Fish right out of the tank!

just one small part of the Cheese Shop

My favorite Deli

…and my favorite Produce Department

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