One of America’s Favorites – Cream Cheese

June 11, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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Cream Cheese

Cream cheese is a soft, mild-tasting fresh cheese made from milk and cream. Stabilizers such as carob bean gum and carrageenan are typically added in industrial production.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration defines cream cheese as containing at least 33% milk fat with a moisture content of not more than 55%, and a pH range of 4.4 to 4.9. Similarly, under Canadian Food and Drug Regulations cream cheese must contain at least 30% milk fat and a maximum of 55% moisture. In other countries, it is defined differently and may need a considerably higher fat content.

Cream cheese is not naturally matured and is meant to be consumed fresh, so it differs from other soft cheeses such as Brie and Neufchâtel. It is more comparable in taste, texture, and production methods to Boursin and Mascarpone.

Recipes for cream cheese can be found in U.S. cookbooks and newspapers beginning in the mid-18th century. By the 1820s the dairy farms in and around Philadelphia and New York City had gained a reputation for producing the best examples of this cheese. Cream cheese was produced on family farms throughout the country, so quantities made and distributed were typically small.

A block of Philadelphia cream cheese

Around 1873 William A. Lawrence, a Chester, New York dairyman, was the first to mass-produce cream cheese. In 1872 he purchased a Neufchâtel factory and shortly thereafter, by adding cream to the process, was able to create a richer cheese that he called “cream cheese”. In 1877 he created the first brand of cream cheese: its logo was a silhouette of a cow followed by the words “Neufchatel & Cream Cheese”. In 1879, to create a larger factory, Lawrence entered into an arrangement with another Chester merchant, Samuel S. Durland. In 1880, Alvah Reynolds, a New York cheese distributor, began to sell the cheese of Lawrence & Durland and called it “Philadelphia Cream Cheese”. By the end of 1880, faced with increasing demand for his Philadelphia-brand cheese, Reynolds turned to Charles Green, a second Chester dairyman, who by 1880 had been manufacturing cream cheese as well. Some of Green’s cheese was now also sold under the Philadelphia label. In 1892 Reynolds bought the Empire Cheese Co. of South Edmeston, New York, to produce cheese under his “Philadelphia” label. When the Empire factory burned down in 1900 he asked the newly formed Phenix Cheese Company to create his cheese, instead. In 1903 Reynolds sold rights to the “Philadelphia” brand name to Phenix Cheese Company under the direction of Jason F. Whitney, Sr. (which merged with Kraft in 1928). By the early 1880s Star cream cheese had emerged as Lawrence & Durland’s brand and Green’s made World and Globe brands of the cheese. At the turn of the 20th century, New York dairymen were producing cream cheese under a number of other brands, as well: Triple Cream (C. Percival), Eagle (F.X. Baumert), Empire (Phenix Cheese Co.), Mohican (International Cheese Co.), Monroe Cheese Co. (Gross & Hoffman), and Nabob (F.H. Legget).

Popular in the Jewish cuisine of New York City, where it is commonly known as a “schmear”, it forms the basis of the bagel and cream cheese, a common open-faced sandwich which also often includes lox, capers, and other ingredients. The basic bagel and cream cheese has become a ubiquitous breakfast and brunch food throughout the U.S.

Cream cheese is easy to make at home, and many methods and recipes are used. Consistent, reliable, commercial manufacture is more difficult. Normally, protein molecules in milk have a negative surface charge, which keeps milk in a liquid state; the molecules act as surfactants, forming micelles around the particles of fat and keeping them in emulsion. Lactic acid bacteria are added to pasteurized and homogenized milk. During the fermentation around 22 °C (72 °F), the pH of the milk decreases (it becomes more acidic). Amino acids at the surface of the proteins begin losing charge and become neutral, turning the fat micelles from hydrophilic to hydrophobic state and causing the liquid to coagulate. If the bacteria are left in the milk too long, the pH lowers further, the micelles attain a positive charge, and the mixture returns to liquid form. The key, then, is to kill the bacteria by heating the mixture to 52–63 °C (126–145 °F) at the moment the cheese is at the isoelectric point, meaning the state at which half the ionizable surface amino acids of the proteins are positively charged and half are negative.

Inaccurate timing of the heating can produce inferior or unsalable cheese due to variations in flavor and texture. Cream cheese has a higher fat content than other cheeses, and fat repels water, which tends to separate from the cheese; this can be avoided in commercial production by adding stabilizers such as guar or carob gums to prolong its shelf life.

In Canada, the regulations for cream cheese stipulate that it is made by coagulating cream with the help of bacteria, forming a curd which is then formed into a mass after removing the whey. Some of its ingredients include cream (to adjust milk fat content), salt, nitrogen (to improve spreadability) and several gelling, thickening, stabilizing and emulsifying ingredients such as xanthan gum or gelatin, to a maximum of 0.5 percent. Regulations on preservatives used are that either sorbic acid, or propionic acid may be used independently or combined, but only to a maximum of 3,000 parts per million when used together. The only acceptable enzymes that can be used in manufacturing of cream cheese to be sold in Canada are chymosin A and B, pepsin and rennet.

In Spain and Mexico, cream cheese is sometimes called by the generic name queso filadelfia, following the marketing of Philadelphia branded cream cheese by Kraft Foods.

Cream cheese is often spread on bread, bagels, crackers, etc., and used as a dip for potato chips and similar snack items, and in salads. It can be mixed with other ingredients, such as yogurt or pepper jelly, to make spreads.

Cream cheese on a bagel

Cream cheese can be used for many purposes in sweet and savoury cookery, and is in the same family of ingredients as other milk products, such as cream, milk, butter, and yogurt. It can be used in cooking to make cheesecake and to thicken sauces and make them creamy. Cream cheese is sometimes used in place of or with butter (typically two parts cream cheese to one part butter) when making cakes or cookies, and cream cheese frosting. It is the main ingredient in the filling of crab rangoon, an appetizer commonly served at U.S. Chinese restaurants. It can also be used instead of or with butter or olive oil in mashed potatoes, and in some westernized sushi rolls. It can also be used for ants on a log.

American cream cheese tends to have lower fat content than elsewhere, but “Philadelphia” branded cheese is sometimes suggested as a substitute for petit suisse.

 

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Slow Cooker Appetizers and Side Dishes

February 14, 2018 at 5:59 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its Slow Cooker Appetizers and Side Dishes. Delicious and Diabetic Friendly Slow Cooker Appetizers and Side Dish Recipes like; Hot Wing Dip, Bourbon-Glazed Cocktail Sausages, and White Bean Spread. Find these recipes and more all at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

Slow Cooker Appetizers and Side Dishes
Fix these diabetes-friendly appetizers and side dishes quickly, then let them simmer in the slow cooker until they’re ready to serve. We’ve also suggested some fresh salad and vegetable dishes to pair with your slow cooker meals.

Hot Wing Dip
Blue cheese salad dressing balances the hotness of the bottled Buffalo wing sauce, making this a crowd-pleasing dish. Serve with crisp celery sticks……..

Bourbon-Glazed Cocktail Sausages
Apricot preserves, maple syrup, and bourbon blend beautifully in this slow-cooked appetizer perfect for any occasion. You can serve these party favorites as soon as they’re done or keep them warm in the slow cooker for up to an hour……..

White Bean Spread
Make this dip ahead of time and chill for 24 hours, if you like. Bring the spread to room temperature before serving with crispy whole wheat pita chips……….

* Click the link below to get all the Slow Cooker Appetizers and Side Dishes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/appetizer/slow-cooker-appetizers-side-dishes

Easy No-Cook Appetizer Recipes

January 7, 2016 at 5:54 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website it’s Easy No-Cook Appetizer Recipes. Easily prepared Appetizers that are flavorful and lightened up. Check the EatingWell website for healthy and delicious recipes of all cuisines! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 

Easy No-Cook Appetizer Recipes

Entertaining is easy with these healthy no-cook appetizers.EatingWell2
If you’re planning a party or want a quick snack before dinner, these healthy no-cook appetizer recipes are sure to be a hit. Many of our delicious appetizers can be made ahead, making entertaining even easier. Try our Marinated Olives & Feta for flavor-packed finger food or Creamy Spinach Dip for a lightened-up version of this party favorite.

 

 

Marinated Olives & Feta
Olives and feta marinated with rosemary, lemon and garlic are great served on crisp flatbread-style crackers or warm slices of crusty baguette……

 
Creamy Spinach Dip
Try this light spinach dip made healthier with reduced-fat cream cheese, nonfat yogurt and low-fat cottage cheese instead of full-fat cheese, mayonnaise and sour cream. It will save you a whopping 84 calories and 10 grams of fat per serving when compared to traditional versions. Serve it with pita chips and crunchy vegetables or spread it on a sandwich…..

 
Ham & Red Pepper Spread
Spread this creamy ham and roasted red pepper dip on Belgian endive, crackers or toasted baguette or use it as a dip for vegetables…….

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Easy No-Cook Appetizer Recipes

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_no_cook_appetizer_recipes

“Meatless Monday” Recipe – Vegan “Cheese” Spread

December 22, 2014 at 6:30 AM | Posted in Meatless Monday, PBS | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe is Vegan “Cheese” Spread. Another good one from the PBS website. http://www.pbs.org/food/

 
Vegan “Cheese” Spread

Some vegans have a hard time giving up cheese, but this spread tastes like the real thing.

 

PBS

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons miso
1 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
2 teaspoons tahini
1 teaspoon yellow mustard
1/2 teaspoon sweet paprika
1/4 teaspoon onion powder
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon salt (to taste)
1/2 cup water
1 packet (0.15 ounces) agar powder (a.k.a. kanten)
1 tablespoon pistachio nuts, finely minced

 

 

Directions
1 – Put the raw cashews, sun-dried tomatoes and soy milk in a sealable bag, squeeze out the air and refrigerate for at least 1 day (you can skip this step if you are using a Vitamix).
2 – In the bowl of a food processor or blender, add the soaked cashews, tomatoes and remaining soy milk into a food processor along with the nutritional yeast, coconut oil, miso, apple cider vinegar, tahini, mustard, paprika, onion powder, turmeric and salt. Process or blend until smooth and creamy, scraping down the sides a few times. You can add a bit more soy milk if the mixture is too thick and won’t blend, but you want it to be as thick as possible.
3 – Meanwhile put 1/2 cup water and agar powder into a small sauce pan and bring the water to a full boil.
4 – Once the cheese spread is smooth and the agar mixture has boiled, pour the agar mixture into cheese mixture and process to combine.
5 – Put the spread in a ramekin, cover and refrigerate until you are ready to serve it.
6 – When you’re ready to serve, uncover and sprinkle the minced pistachios on top to garnish.

 
http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/vegan-cheese-spread/

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