Oktoberfest Zinzinnati Cincinnati, Ohio – September 15-17, 2017

September 13, 2017 at 9:37 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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Oktoberfest Zinzinnati

FESTIVAL HOURS
Friday, September 15, 2017 | 5 p.m.- 11 p.m.
Saturday, September 16, 2017 | 11 a.m.- 11 p.m.
Sunday, September 17, 2017 | 11 a.m.- 9 p.m.

LOCATION
Oktoberfest Zinzinnati takes places on Second and Third Streets, between Walnut and Elm Streets, downtown.

What is Oktoberfest Zinzinnati?
Oktoberfest Zinzinnati, presented by Samuel Adams, is America’s largest Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest Zinzinnati is held on 2nd and 3rd Streets, between Elm and Walnut in downtown Zinzinnati. There are many public and private parking garages downtown within walking distance of the festival site.

Oktoberfest Zinzinnati showcases the rich German heritage of Southwest Ohio, as well as tasty samples of German-style music, food and beer. First held in 1976, the event has grown to be America’s largest Oktoberfest with more than 500,000 people attending each year.

Chicken Dance

The 2017 World’s Largest Chicken Dance will be led by Grand Marshals A.J. Green and Andy Dalton of the Cincinnati Bengals!
One of the favorite events at Oktoberfest Zinzinnati is the World’s Largest Chicken dance. Join thousands of dancers for a few choruses of the Chicken Dance.

Sunday, September 17, 2017
1:00pm
Sam Adams Main Stage at 2nd & Elm
http://www.oktoberfestzinzinnati.com/

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Germania Society Oktoberfest – August 25-27, 2017 Colerain, Ohio

August 25, 2017 at 2:39 PM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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Willkommen to the 47th Annual
Germania Society Oktoberfest!   http://germaniasociety.com/

Cincinnati’s original and most authentic Oktoberfest.

The very first Oktoberfest, held in Munich, celebrated the marriage of King Ludwig I in 1810, and the tradition has been carried on yearly in towns throughout Bavaria. Since the mid-20th century, cities around the world — especially in the U.S. — have held their own celebrations modeled after the one in Munich. The Germania Society of Cincinnati held our first Oktoberfest in 1971, the first in the Cincinnati region.

Since the end of our very successful Maifest, members of the Germania Society have been grooming our manicured Wiesn (event meadow), preparing our idyllic wooded picnic grove, readying our Klubhaus, and decorating our pavilion in anticipation of this year’s Oktoberfest celebration! Join us this August and stroll the beautiful Germania Park grounds surrounded by nature while enjoying traditional food, drink, and entertainment.

HOURS
Friday, August 25, 6pm-12pm
Saturday, August 26, 2pm-12pm
Sunday, August 27, Noon-8pm

ADMISSION
Only $5, plus FREE Parking.
12 and under free.
Free admission to active and retired military with current ID card.
– Sorry, but no pets allowed. –

DIRECTIONS
PARKING
Conveniently located in Colerain Township, just off of Rt. 27.

FOUR satellite parking locations,
with frequent, FREE shuttle buses!
http://germaniasociety.com/

One of America’s Favorites – Pretzels

February 29, 2016 at 6:06 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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An assortment of pretzels

An assortment of pretzels

A pretzel (German: Brezel or Breze) is a type of baked bread product made from dough most commonly shaped into a twisted knot. Pretzels originated in Europe, possibly among monasteries in the Early Middle Ages. The traditional pretzel shape is a distinctive symmetrical looped form, with the ends of a long strip of dough intertwined and then twisted back into itself in a certain way (“a pretzel loop”). Pretzels now come in different shapes. Salt is the most common seasoning for pretzels, complementing the washing soda or lye treatment that gives pretzels their traditional “skin” and flavor through the Maillard reaction; other seasonings include sugars, chocolate, glazes, seeds, and/or nuts.

 

 

Hard Pretzels

Hard Pretzels

In the late 18th century, southern German and Swiss German immigrants introduced the pretzel to North America. The immigrants became known as the Pennsylvania Dutch, and in time, many handmade pretzel bakeries populated the central Pennsylvania countryside, and the pretzel’s popularity spread.

In the 20th century, soft pretzels became popular in other regions of the United States. Cities like Philadelphia, Chicago, and New York became renowned for their soft pretzels. The key to success was the introduction of the new mass production methods of the industrialized age, which increased the availability and quantity, and the opening up of multiple points of distribution at schools, convenience and grocery stores, and entertainment venues such as movie theaters, arenas, concert halls, and sport stadiums. Prior to that, street vendors used to sell pretzels on street corners in wooden glass-enclosed cases.

In particular, the S-shaped soft pretzel, often served with brown mustard, became iconic in Philadelphia and was established as a part of Philadelphia’s cuisine for snacking at school, work, or home, and considered by most to be a quick meal. The average Philadelphian today consumes about twelve times as many pretzels as the national average.

Pennsylvania today is the center of American pretzel production for both the hard-crispy and the soft-bread types of pretzels. Southeastern Pennsylvania, with its large population of German background, is considered the birthplace of the American pretzel industry, and many pretzel bakers are still located in the area. Pennsylvania produces 80% of the nation’s pretzels.

The annual United States pretzel industry is worth over $550 million. The average American consumes about 1.5

Mini pretzel rods

Mini pretzel rods

pounds (0.7 kg) of pretzels per year.

The privately run “Pretzel Museum” opened in Philadelphia in 1993. In 2003, Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell declared April 26 “National Pretzel Day” to acknowledge the importance of the pretzel to the state’s history and economy. Philly Pretzel Factory stores offer a free pretzel to each customer on this day.

Hard pretzels originated in the United States, where, in 1850, the Sturgis bakery in Lititz, Pennsylvania, became the first commercial hard pretzel bakery. Snack food hard pretzels were shaped as sticks (around 3 millimetres (0.12 in) thick and 12 centimetres (4.7 in) long), loops, braids, letters or little pretzels; they have become a popular snack in many countries around the world. A thicker variety of sticks can be 1 centimetre (0.39 in) thick; in the U. S. these are called Bavarian pretzels. Unlike the soft pretzels, these were durable when kept in an airtight environment and marketable in a variety of convenience stores. Large-scale production began in the first half of the 1900s, more so during 1930 to 1950. A prime example was in 1949, when highly innovative American Machine and Foundry Co., of New York City, developed the “pretzel bender”: a new automatic crispy-styled baked pretzel-twisting machine that rolled and tied them at the rate of 50 a minute—more than twice as fast as skilled hand twisters could make them—and conveyed them through the baking and salting process. In Europe, snack-food pretzels are usually sprinkled with salt, but also with sesame seed, poppy-seed or cheese. In the U.S., they come in many varieties of flavors and coatings, such as yogurt, chocolate, strawberry, mustard, cheese and others, and chocolate-covered hard pretzels are popular around Christmas time and given as gifts. The variety of shapes and sizes became contest of imagination in the marketing of the pretzels taste. During the 1900s, people in Philadelphia would use the small slender pretzel stick as a common accompaniment to ice cream or would crumble pretzels as a topping. This combination of cold sweet and salty taste was very popular for many years. Eventually this led to the development of an ice cream cone tasting like a pretzel. More recently Mars, Incorporated manufactures M&M’s with a small spherical pretzel covered in milk chocolate and candy coated in all of the standard M&Ms colors, called “Pretzel M&M’s”.

Soft pretzels are frequently sold in shopping malls, with notable chains including Auntie Anne’s and Pretzelmaker/Pretzel Time.

 
Pennsylvania milestones

1800s

Philadelphia style soft pretzel

Philadelphia style soft pretzel

Southern German and Swiss German immigrants who became known as the Pennsylvania Dutch introduced soft pretzels and pretzel bakery businesses.
1861
Sturgis Pretzel House in Lititz, Pennsylvania becomes the first commercial hard pretzel bakery in the United States.
1889
The Anderson Pretzel Factory in Lancaster, Pennsylvania is founded. Today it calls itself the world’s largest, producing 65 tons of hard pretzels daily.
1935
The Reading Pretzel Machinery Company in Reading, Pennsylvania introduced the first automatic hard pretzel twisting machine.
1963
The largest soft pretzel of its time, weighing 40 pounds and measuring 5 feet across, is baked by Joseph Nacchio of the Federal Pretzel Baking Company for film It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.
1978
The first machine-produced stamped cut soft pretzel was innovated at Federal Pretzel Baking Company.
1993
The first Pretzel Museum of soft pretzels is opened in Philadelphia. A 7 minute film, demonstration of championship hand twisting at 57 per minute and tasting were highlights.
2003
Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell declares April 26 National Pretzel Day to acknowledge the importance of the pretzel to the state’s history and economy.

 
Freeport, Illinois, which sits about 100 miles outside of Chicago, is another city known for its rich pretzel history. In 1869, a German immigrant named John Billerbeck established the first Billerbeck Bakery which was known for selling German style pretzels to compliment the large number of breweries that existed in Freeport during this time. Prohibition eventually shut down the breweries which led to the decline of pretzel sales in Freeport, but the city never lost its pretzel pride. For more than 100 years Freeport has been known as “Pretzel City, USA.” Their high school athletic mascot is the Pretzel and the football stadium has been appropriately named “Pretzel Field.” In 2003, local citizens launched Freeport’s first Pretzel Festival which is a large community event where residents get together to celebrate the city’s pretzel history. Contestants are chosen to be crowned Pretzel Prince and Princess and a festival mascot by the name of “Pretzel Bill” (stemming from the Billerbeck Bakery name) dresses as a 6 foot tall walking talking pretzel who hands out pretzels from floats and takes photos with the local festival goers.

Although not as popular as among German speakers and Americans, the looped pretzel is known in other European countries and in other countries around the world. In the Czech Republic, the pretzel is known as preclík, in Finland as viipurinrinkeli, in Slovakia it is called praclík. The Spanish, French and Italians call it pretzel, bretzel or brezel, the Dutch favor sweet variants called krakeling, Norwegian and Danish call it a kringle, and the Swedish call it kringla. In Polish it is precel, in Hungarian and Croatian it is perec, and in Serbian it is pereca. In Romania the pretzel is known as a variety of covering and it is a very popular fast food in urban areas and also as a holiday gift.

 

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