20+ Diabetic Salmon Recipes

April 14, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its – 20+ Diabetic Salmon Recipes. Delicious Diabetic Salmon Recipes like; Cedar Plank Grilled Salmon, Salmon Cakes with Caper Mayonnaise, and Grilled Salmon with Blueberry Sauce. Find these recipes and more all at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

20+ Diabetic Salmon Recipes
Served on its own or in a salad, wrap, or soup, salmon is a healthy and delicious protein choice that is low carb and heart-healthy. There are many ways to prepare the omega-3-rich fish — baked, grilled, poached — so the recipe options are endless. To help get you started, we’ve compiled our favorite healthy salmon recipes.

Cedar Plank Grilled Salmon
Grilled on a soaked cedar plank, this so-simple salmon recipe is the brainwork of Chef Chris Smith, The Diabetic Chef. Season with thyme, chives, and lemon slices, and enjoy a diabetic dinner for only 2 carb grams per serving…….

Salmon Cakes with Caper Mayonnaise
Get creative and utilize leftover salmon from the previous recipe to put together this Cajun-inspired meal. To form patties, combine salmon and crackers with mustard and egg whites. Cook the crispy salmon cakes in a skillet, and top with caper mayonnaise to serve……..

Grilled Salmon with Blueberry Sauce
Top salmon fillets with a surprising sauce made from blueberries. The fruity dressing gives this low-carb seafood dish a gourmet spin. Sprinkle with chives to serve……..

 

* Click the link below to get all the 20+ Diabetic Salmon Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/fish/20-diabetic-salmon-recipes

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One of America’s Favorites – Spare Ribs

August 3, 2015 at 5:15 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 3 Comments
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A rack of uncooked pork spare ribs

A rack of uncooked pork spare ribs

Spare ribs (also side ribs or spareribs) are a variety of pork ribs or beef ribs, cooked and eaten in various cuisines around the world. They are the most inexpensive cut of pork and beef ribs. They are a long cut from the lower portion of the pig or cattle, specifically the belly and breastbone, behind the shoulder, and include 11 to 13 long bones. There is a covering of meat on top of the bones as well as between them.

 

 

The term comes from Low German ribbesper (referring to pickled pork ribs, cooked on a spit), the parts of which refer, in order, to rib and spit.

* Pork spare ribs are also popular in Chinese and American Chinese cuisine; they are generally called paigu. Cantonese: paigwat; literally “row of bones”).
* In County Cork, Ireland, pork or beef spare ribs are boiled and eaten with potatoes and turnips. This dish is called bodice locally.

 

 

In American South cuisine:
Spare ribs have also become popular in the American South. They are generally cooked on a barbecue or on an open fire, and are served as a slab (bones and all) with a sauce. American butchers prepare two cuts:

* Pork spare ribs are taken from the belly side of the pig’s rib cage above the sternum (breast bone) and below the back ribs which extend about 6″ down from the spine. Spare ribs are flatter than the curved back ribs and contain more bone than meat. There is also quite a bit of fat which can make the ribs more tender than baby back ribs.
* St. Louis Cut ribs are spare ribs where the sternum bone, cartilage, and the surrounding meat known as the rib tips have been removed. St. Louis Cut rib racks are almost rectangular.
* Beef spare ribs are taken from the belly side of the cattle’s rib cage above the sternum (breast bone). Beef spare ribs tend to be longer, wider, and sometimes more curved than their pork counterparts, and are cut from the prime rib rump, of which the thicker boneless part becomes the ribeye steak, and the upper tips of the ribs are then cut off and become short ribs.

Chinese Style Spare Ribs

Chinese Style Spare Ribs

In Chinese cuisines:
* In Chinese cuisine, pork spare ribs are generally first cut into 3-4 inch (7–10 cm) sections, then may be fried, steamed, or braised.
* In the Cantonese cuisine of southern China, spare ribs are generally red in color and roasted with a sweet and savory sauce. This variety of spare ribs is grouped as one of the most common items of siu mei, or Cantonese roasted meat dishes.
* In American Chinese cuisine, pork spare ribs are generally cooked in char siu style, and often feature as a part of the appetizer dish called pu pu platter.

 

 

Spare ribs are usually consumed individually by hand, with the small amount of meat adhering to the bone gnawed off by the eater.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Pork

July 13, 2015 at 5:21 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 4 Comments
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Pork belly cut, shows layers of muscle and fats

Pork belly cut, shows layers of muscle and fats

Pork is the culinary name for meat from the domestic pig (Sus domesticus). It is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide, with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BC. Pork is eaten both freshly cooked and preserved. Curing extends the shelf life of the pork products. Ham, smoked pork, gammon, bacon and sausage are examples of preserved pork. Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, many from pork.

Pork is the most popular meat in East and Southeast Asia, and is also very common in the Western world. It is highly prized in Asian cuisines for its fat content and pleasant texture. The religions of Judaism and Islam, as well as some Christian denominations, forbid pork consumption; the sale of pork is illegal in many Muslim countries, particularly in those with sharia law as part of the constitution, and is severely restricted in Israel (the only country with a Jewish majority).

 

 

Slow-roasting pig on a rotisserie

Slow-roasting pig on a rotisserie

The pig is one of the oldest forms of livestock, having been domesticated as early as 5000 BC. It is believed to have been domesticated either in the Near East or in China from the wild boar. The adaptable nature and omnivorous diet of this creature allowed early humans to domesticate it much earlier than many other forms of livestock, such as cattle. Pigs were mostly used for food, but people also used their hides for shields and shoes, their bones for tools and weapons, and their bristles for brushes. Pigs have other roles within the human economy: their feeding behaviour in searching for roots churns up the ground and makes it easier to plough; their sensitive noses lead them to truffles, an underground fungus highly valued by humans; and their omnivorous nature enables them to eat human rubbish, keeping settlements cleaner.

Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products such as bacon, ham, sausage, terrines, galantines, pâtés, and confit, primarily from pork. Originally intended as a way to preserve meats before the advent of refrigeration, these preparations are prepared today for the flavours that are derived from the preservation processes. In 15th century France, local guilds regulated tradesmen in the food production industry in each city. The guilds that produced charcuterie were those of the charcutiers. The members of this guild produced a traditional range of cooked or salted and dried meats, which varied, sometimes distinctively, from region to region. The only “raw” meat the charcutiers were allowed to sell was unrendered lard. The charcutier prepared numerous items, including pâtés, rillettes, sausages, bacon, trotters, and head cheese.

 

 

Before the mass production and re-engineering of pork in the 20th century, pork in Europe and North America was traditionally an autumn dish—pigs and other livestock coming to the slaughter in the autumn after growing in the spring and fattening during the summer. Due to the seasonal nature of the meat in Western culinary history, apples (harvested in late summer and autumn) have been a staple pairing to fresh pork. The year-round availability of meat and fruits has not diminished the popularity of this combination on Western plates.

Pork is the most widely eaten meat in the world, accounting for about 38% of meat production worldwide, although consumption varies widely from place to place. The meat is Taboo to eat in the Middle East and most of the Muslim world because of Jewish kosher and Islamic Halal dietary restrictions. But pork is widely consumed in East and Southeast Asia, Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Americas and Oceania. As the result, large numbers of pork recipes are developed throughout the world. Feijoada for example, the national dish of Brazil (also served in Portugal), is traditionally prepared with pork trimmings: ears, tail and feet.

According to the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service, nearly 100 million metric tons of pork were consumed worldwide in 2006 (preliminary data). Increasing urbanization and disposable income has led to a rapid rise in pork consumption in China, where 2006 consumption was 20% higher than in 2002, and a further 5% increase projected in 2007. In 2013 recorded total 109.075 million metric tons of pork were consumed worldwide.
Pork products
Pork may be cooked from fresh meat or cured over time. Cured meat products include ham and bacon. The carcass may be used in many different ways for fresh meat cuts, with the popularity of certain cuts and certain carcass proportions varying worldwide.

Fresh meat
Most of the carcass can be used to produce fresh meat and in the case of a suckling pig, the whole body of a young pig ranging in age from two to six weeks is roasted. Danish roast pork or flæskesteg, prepared with crispy crackling is a national favourite as the traditional Christmas dinner.

Processed pork

Pork is particularly common as an ingredient in sausages. Many traditional European sausages are made with pork, including chorizo, fuet, Cumberland sausage and salami. Many brands of American hot dogs and most breakfast sausages are made from pork. Processing of pork into sausages and other products in France is described as charcuterie.

Ham and bacon are made from fresh pork by curing with salt (pickling) and/or smoking. Shoulders and legs are most commonly cured in this manner for Picnic shoulder and ham, whereas streaky and round bacon come from the side (round from the loin and streaky from the belly).

Ham and bacon are popular foods in the west, and their consumption has increased with industrialisation. Non-western cuisines also use preserved meat products. For example, salted preserved pork or red roasted pork is used in Chinese and Asian cuisine.

Bacon is defined as any of certain cuts of meat taken from the sides, belly or back that have been cured and/or smoked. In continental Europe, it is used primarily in cubes (lardons) as a cooking ingredient valued both as a source of fat and for its flavour. In Italy, besides being used in cooking, bacon (pancetta) is also served uncooked and thinly sliced as part of an antipasto. Bacon is also used for barding roasts, especially game birds. Bacon is often smoked, using various types of wood, a process which can take up to ten hours. Bacon may be eaten fried, baked, or grilled.

A side of unsliced bacon is a “flitch” or “slab bacon”, while an individual slice of bacon is a “rasher” (Australia, Ireland, New Zealand and the United Kingdom) or simply a “slice” or “strip” (North America). Slices of bacon are also known as “collops”. Traditionally, the skin is left on the cut and is known as “bacon rind”. Rindless bacon, however, is quite common. In both Ireland and the United Kingdom, bacon comes in a wide variety of cuts and flavours, and is predominantly known as “streaky bacon”, or “streaky rashers”. Bacon made from the meat on the back of the pig is referred to as “back bacon” and is part of traditional full breakfast commonly eaten in Britain and Ireland. In the United States, back bacon may also be referred to as “Canadian-style Bacon” or “Canadian Bacon”.

The USDA defines bacon as “the cured belly of a swine carcass”, while other cuts and characteristics must be separately qualified (e.g. “smoked pork loin bacon”). “USDA Certified” bacon means that it has been treated for Trichinella.

The canned meat Spam is made of chopped pork shoulder meat and ham.

Cuts

The pig is well known for being able to be used from nose-to-tail. There are multiple systems of naming for cuts in

Smoked pork ribs

Smoked pork ribs

America, Britain, Germany, France and other countries.
* Head: This can be used to make brawn, stocks and soups. After boiling, the ears can be fried or baked and eaten separately.
* Spare rib roast/spare rib joint/blade shoulder/shoulder butt: This is the shoulder and contains the shoulder blade. It can be boned out and rolled up as a roasting joint, or cured as “collar bacon”. It is not to be confused with the rack of spare ribs from the front belly. Pork butt, despite its name, is from the upper part of the shoulder. The Boston butt, or Boston-style shoulder, cut comes from this area, and may contain the shoulder blade.
* Hand/arm shoulder/arm picnic: This can be cured on the bone to make a ham-like product, or used in sausages.
* Loin: This can be cured to give back bacon or Canadian-style bacon. The loin and belly can be cured together to give a side of bacon. The loin can also be divided up into roasts (blade loin roasts, centre loin roasts, and sirloin roasts come from the front, centre, or rear of the loin), back ribs (also called baby back ribs, or riblets), pork cutlets, and pork chops. A pork loin crown roast is arranged into a circle, either boneless or with rib bones protruding upward as points in a crown. Pork tenderloin, removed from the loin, should be practically free of fat. This high quality meat shows a very ordered arrangement of muscle cells that can cause light diffraction and structural coloration.
* Fatback: The subcutaneous fat and skin on the back are used to make pork rinds, a variety of cured “meats”, lardons, and lard.
* Belly/side/side pork: The belly, although a fattier meat, can be used for steaks or diced stir-fry meat. Belly pork may be rolled for roasting or cut for streaky bacon.
* Legs/hams: Although any cut of pork can be cured, technically speaking only the back leg is entitled to be called a ham. Legs and shoulders, when used fresh, are usually cut bone-in for roasting, or leg steaks can be cut from the bone. Three common cuts of the leg include the rump (upper portion), centre, and shank (lower portion).
* Trotters: Both the front and hind trotters can be cooked and eaten.
Spare ribs, or spareribs, are taken from the pig’s ribs and the meat surrounding the bones. St. Louis–style spareribs have the sternum, cartilage, and skirt meat removed.
* Knuckles, intestines, jowls and all other parts of the pig may also be eaten.
* Tail: The tail has a very little meat, but many people enjoy the flavor. It can be roasted or fried, which makes the skin become crisp, and the bone soft. It has a strong flavor.

Its myoglobin content is lower than that of beef, but much higher than that of chicken. The USDA treats pork as a red

Ham is a popular way to prepare pork

Ham is a popular way to prepare pork

meat. Pork is very high in thiamin (vitamin B1). Pork with its fat trimmed is leaner than the meat of most domesticated animals, but is high in cholesterol and saturated fat.

In 1987 the U.S. National Pork Board began an advertising campaign to position pork as “the other white meat”—due to a public perception of chicken and turkey (white meat) as healthier than red meat. The campaign was highly successful and resulted in 87% of consumers identifying pork with the slogan. The board retired the slogan on 4 March 2011.

 

Buckeye State BBQ Championship MAY 16-17 2014

May 15, 2014 at 8:49 AM | Posted in BBQ, Festivals, grilling | Leave a comment
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Buckeye State BBQ Championship MAY 16-17 2014

 

Buckeye-BBQ-Fest_FinalPoster_Starburst-791x1024
MAY 16-17 2014
Fri., 6pm-11pm and Sat., 11am-11pm
$5 per person, children under 12 Free,
Weekend VIP Passes additional
Blues, Brews & BBQ from Opening til Closing

 

 

Bring a chair or blanket, friends and family too. No coolers or pets

 
Address
The Square @ Union Centre
9285 Centre Pointe Drive
West Chester, Ohio 45069

 
Barbeque
Over 35 of the top BBQ Teams in the nation will set-up on “Pit Row” to compete in the second Buckeye State BBQ Championship. Come watch the competition.

 

 

Blues and Brews
Over a dozen Blues bands will perform from Opening to Closing both Friday and Saturday. Saturday night features, 2014 CEA Nominated, Scotty Bratcher Band.

 

 

Kids Zone
Inflatable rides, magic shows, storytelling, and a petting zoo… Proceeds benefit local children’s programs.

 

 

http://www.voabbqbash.org/

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