Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 28, 2022 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Prepare Full Dishes in Advance…..

Because many holiday dishes incorporate whole grains, hearty vegetables and sauces, they tend to save very well. Many dishes, particularly pastas, casseroles, stews, soups, breads and pies are even better a day or two after they’re made, so make these in advance.

Advertisement

Healthy, Quick and Easy Side Dish Recipes

November 27, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in EatingWell | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website it’s Healthy, Quick and Easy Side Dish Recipes. Find some Delicious, Healthy, Quick and Easy Side Dish Recipes with recipes including Roasted Sweet Potatoes, Steamed Fresh Green Beans, and Sautéed Peppers and Onions. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy, Quick and Easy Side Dish Recipes
Find healthy, quick and easy side dish recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Roasted Sweet Potatoes
This incredibly simple and quick recipe for roasted sweet potatoes relies on the most basic of seasonings–olive oil, salt and pepper. Ready in just 30 minutes, it’s a great side dish for a family dinner on a busy weeknight but because it’s so easy and delicious, it can also be doubled or tripled and served at larger gatherings……

Steamed Fresh Green Beans
Steaming (but not for too long!) is a foolproof way to get perfect, crisp-tender green beans, every time. This easy recipe is a great starting point for other flavors or preparations, like adding cooked green beans to a salad……

Sautéed Peppers and Onions
This simple technique of cooking onions and peppers is a useful way to get your veggie servings in. They’re quite versatile–use these peppers and onions on a burger or sausage sandwich, stuff them into quesadillas or layer them into casseroles……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy, Quick and Easy Side Dish Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19332/cooking-methods-styles/quick-easy/side-dish/

Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Zucchini, Tomato and Provolone Bake

November 6, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is a Zucchini, Tomato and Provolone Bake. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Zucchini Squash, Basil Pesto Fresh Ground Black Pepper, Panko Bread Crumbs, Plum Tomatoes, and Sargento Sliced Reduced Sodium Provolone Cheese. There’s 182 calories and 12 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Zucchini, Tomato and Provolone Bake
This delicious, low-sodium side dish can also be served as a hearty, meatless main dish. A wonderful dish for using the summer’s garden bounty of zucchini, too!

Recipe Ingredients:
1 pound (about 4 small) zucchini squash
1/4 cup prepared basil pesto
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup panko bread crumbs – divided use
1 pound plum tomatoes (about 5 medium), cut into 1/4-inch slices
8 slices Sargento Sliced Reduced Sodium Provolone Cheese

Cooking Directions:
1 – Wash zucchini but do not dry. Cut crosswise into 1/4-inch thick slices; transfer to a microwave-safe casserole dish. Cover with lid. Cook in microwave oven three to four minutes or until crisp-tender. Drain in colander; rinse with cold water to stop cooking. Transfer to clean kitchen towel or paper towels to dry. Toss zucchini with pesto sauce and pepper.
2 – Sprinkle 1/2 cup bread crumbs in bottom of 8 or 9-inch baking dish. Spoon half of zucchini mixture evenly over crumbs. Arrange half of tomato slices over zucchini; top with four slices cheese. Repeat layering with remaining zucchini mixture, tomatoes, cheese and bread crumbs.
3 – Bake in a preheated oven at 375°F (190°C) for 25 to 30 minutes or until golden brown.
Makes 8 (side-dish) servings.

Tips:

* Pesto and panko brands vary in sodium content. This nutrition information is based on Buitoni and Kikkoman brands.
* Try ladling warm marinara sauce over individual servings for a delicious main dish.
* If preferred, regular provolone cheese can be used.
Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/8 of recipe): Calories 182; Protein 10g; Carbohydrates 14g; Dietary Fiber 2g; Total Fat 9.8g; Saturated Fat 4.4g; Monounsaturated Fat 3.7g; Polyunsaturated Fat 0.5g; Cholesterol 18 mg; Vitamin A 87RE; Vitamin C 27mg; Calcium 229mg; Iron 2mg; Sodium 268mg
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/sidedish/zucchini_tomato_and_provolone_bake_recipe.html

Chilled Bow Tie Pasta Salad

October 30, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Here’s a recipe for Chilled Bow Tie Pasta Salad. To make this recipe you’ll be using Sun Dried Tomatoes, Bow Tie Pasta, Mushrooms, Snow Peas, Broccoli Florets, and Feta Cheese. Also included is a recipe for the Dressing. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Chilled Bow Tie Pasta Salad
Jam-packed with veggies and perfectly seasoned with a homemade dressing, picnic fare doesn’t get any better than this! Eat as an appetizer or light lunch or, if desired, add grilled chicken strips for a filling main dish.

Ingredients
Preparation time: 50 minutes
Chilling time: 2 hours

1 cup sun-dried tomatoes
1 pound bow tie pasta, cooked
8 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced
2 cups snow peas
2 cups broccoli florets
1/2 cup crumbled Feta cheese

Dressing:
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
3 tablespoons canola oil
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
2 green onions, finely sliced
2 teaspoons (or 2 cloves) minced garlic
1 teaspoon dried parsley
1 1/2 teaspoons dried basil
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
3/4 teaspoon dill weed
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon sugar
Garnish:
1/4 cup shredded fresh Parmesan cheese

Directions
Yield: 16 cups
Serving size: 1 cup

1 – Rehydrate sun-dried tomatoes according to package directions, then chop tomatoes and place them in a large salad bowl. Add cooked pasta and sliced mushrooms; set aside. Fill a large saucepan half full with water and bring to a boil. Add snow peas and broccoli; boil 1 minute. Remove snow peas and broccoli with a slotted spoon and add to the pasta mixture. Sprinkle Feta cheese over pasta mixture; toss well; set aside.

2 – Combine dressing ingredients in a jar, cover tightly, and shake well. Pour over pasta mixture and toss to coat. Chill at least 2 hours to allow flavors to blend. Toss well and garnish with shredded Parmesan cheese.

Note: If desired, add grilled chicken strips for a filling main dish.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 194 calories, Carbohydrates: 28 g, Protein: 7 g, Fat: 6 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Sodium: 251 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/salads/chilled-bow-tie-pasta-salad/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Squash and Corn

October 2, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This Week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is Squash and Corn. To make this week’s Dish you’ll be needing Zucchini, Green Chilies,  Corn Oil, Onion, Bacon Bits, Frozen Corn, Water, and Salt. There’s 65 calories and 9 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Squash and Corn
Packed with zucchini, fresh corn, and a kick from sliced chilies, this side adds a burst of flavor for any meal. Perfect for pairing with pork, chicken, or seafood.

Ingredients
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 20–25 minutes.

1 pound zucchini, sliced lengthwise
3 roasted green chilies, peeled and seeded (banana peppers were used in testing; alternatively, half a 4 1/2-ounce can of roasted, diced chilies can be used)
Cooking spray
1 teaspoon corn oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 teaspoon real bacon bits
2 cups frozen corn, thawed (fresh corn cut from the cob can also be used)
1/4 cup water
1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions
Yield: 4 cups
Serving size: 1/2 cup

1 – Dice zucchini into 1/2-inch pieces. Thinly slice chilies. Coat a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray, add oil, and warm over medium-high heat. Add onion and cook, stirring frequently, until translucent, about 3–4 minutes. Add bacon bits and corn and cook 2–3 minutes more, stirring frequently. Add water, squash, chilies, and salt; stir to mix. Cover pan, reduce heat to medium, and simmer 10–15 minutes, or until corn and zucchini are tender; stir occasionally.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 65 calories, Carbohydrates: 11 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 1 g, Saturated Fat: <1 g, Cholesterol: <1 mg, Sodium: 91 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/squash-and-corn/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – GREEN BEANS WITH SUNFLOWER SEEDS

September 25, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is GREEN BEANS WITH SUNFLOWER SEEDS. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Green Beans, Onion, Garlic, Salt, Ground Pepper, Red Pepper Flakes, Sunflower Seeds, and Oregano. There’s 38 calories and 4 net carbs per serving. So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

GREEN BEANS WITH SUNFLOWER SEEDS
Recipe for Green Beans with Sunflower Seeds from our Side Dishes recipe section.

Ingredients

1 pound fresh green beans
1/2 cup chopped onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
Pinch of crushed red pepper flakes
2 tablespoons shelled sunflower seeds
1 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano, or 1/4 teaspoon dried oregano

Directions

1 – Snap the ends off the beans. If they are very young, leave the beans whole; if large, break the beans into 2-inch lengths. Place the beans in a saucepan; add 1 cup water and the onion, garlic, salt, and pepper.
2 – Cover and bring to a boil; reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook about 8 minutes, until the beans are crisp-tender; drain.
3 – Sprinkle the sunflower seeds and oregano over the beans. Toss lightly to mix.

Recipe Yield: Makes: About 3 cups (6 Servings)

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 38
Fat: 2 grams
Fiber: 2 grams
Sodium: 37 milligrams
Protein: 2 grams
Carbohydrates: 6 grams
Sugars: 1 grams

https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipe/green-beans-with-sunflower-seeds

Asparagus with Fresh Grape Relish

September 18, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Here’s a recipe for a Side Dish from the CooksRecipes Website, Asparagus with Fresh Grape Relish. To make this recipe you’ll be needing Fresh Asparagus, Water, Salt, Onion, Garlic, Seedless Grapes, Balsamic Vinegar, Dijon Style Mustard, and Ground Black Pepper. There’s 110 calories and 17 1/2 carbs per serving. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Asparagus with Fresh Grape Relish
The fresh grape relish also works well with grilled asparagus.

Recipe Ingredients:
1 pound medium fresh asparagus
1 cup water
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 tablespoons finely chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1 cup each coarsely chopped red and green seedless California grapes
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground pepper

Cooking Directions:
1 – Remove thick, woody part of asparagus spears.
2 – Bring water and salt to boil. Add asparagus and cook about 5 to 7 minutes or until crisp-tender and still bright green.
3 – While asparagus is cooking, heat olive oil in a skillet and sauté onion and garlic. Add grapes, vinegar, mustard and pepper; heat thoroughly.
4 – Spoon half of grape mixture onto serving platter, top with cooked asparagus and spoon remaining grape mixture over asparagus.
Makes 4 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/4 of recipe): Calories 110; Protein 3.3 g; Fat 3.0 g; Calories from Fat 22%; Carbohydrate 20.8 g; Cholesterol 0 mg; Fiber 3.3 g; Sodium 108 mg.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/sidedish/asparagus_with_fresh_grape_relish_recipe.html

Grilled Zucchini with Garlic Dip

July 15, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Here’s a Delicious and Healthy Side Dish from the Jennie – O Turkey Website, Grilled Zucchini with Garlic Dip. To make this Side Dish you’ll be needing Fat Free Sour Cream, Fat Free Mayonnaise, Dill, Minced Fresh Garlic, Zucchini, Olive Oil, Kosher Salt, Fresh Ground Pepper, and Whole Lemons. There’s 120 calories and 10 net carbs per serving. You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Stay Safe and Make the SWITCH in 2022! https://www.jennieo.com/

Grilled Zucchini with Garlic Dip
This recipe won’t hurt your calorie budget— it’s 120 calories and prepared in only 20 minutes! Try Grilled Zucchini with Garlic Dip as a more nutritious alternative to breadsticks!

Total Time – 1 Hour
Serving Size – 8 Servings

Ingredients
1/2 – cup fat-free sour cream
1/2 – cup fat-free mayonnaise
2 – tablespoons chopped dill
3 – tablespoons minced fresh garlic
6 – medium whole zucchini
1/4 – cup olive oil
1 – teaspoon kosher salt
1 – teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3 – whole lemons, zested

Directions
1) In small bowl, add sour cream, mayonnaise, dill and garlic.
2) Mix to combine. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
3) Tip: Let sit in the refrigerator a couple hours before serving so the garlic flavor really comes out.
4) Cut the tops and bottoms of zucchini and slice into quarters, lengthwise. Place in a plastic bag.
5) Drizzle in olive oil, salt, pepper, and 1 tablespoon lemon zest and the juice of two lemons.
6) Seal bag and move them around so zucchini is coated. Set aside 15 to 20 minutes to marinate.
7) Heat grill to medium-low heat. Grill zucchini on all sides until tender. Remove zucchini to a plate as it gets done.
8) Sprinkle grilled zucchini with kosher salt and lemon zest, if desired.
9) Serve zucchini with garlic dip.

Nutrition
Calories – 120
Protein – 3g
Carbohydrates – 13g
Fiber – 3g
Sugars – 6g
Fat – 8g
Cholesterol – 5mg
Sodium – 400mg
Saturated Fat – 1g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/grilled-zucchini-with-garlic-dip/

Simple Coleslaw Recipe

July 10, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I have another Diabetic Friendly Side Dish to pass along, Simple Coleslaw Recipe. This one is made using Reduced-Fat Mayonnaise, Cider Vinegar, Celery Salt, Splenda, Cabbage, Purple Cabbage, and Carrots. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Simple Coleslaw Recipe
A quintessential barbecue side, this quick and easy homemade coleslaw dish is the perfect addition to your next cookout. Requiring just five minutes and 10 minutes of preparation time, you can whip up a batch in a jiffy!

Ingredients
Preparation time: 10 minutes

2/3 cup reduced-fat mayonnaise
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
1 1/2 teaspoons Splenda artificial sweetener
1 bag (16 ounces) shredded coleslaw mix (cabbage, purple cabbage, carrot)

Directions
Yield: 4 1/2 cups
Serving size: 1/2 cup

1 – In a small bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, vinegar, celery salt, and Splenda. Place coleslaw mix in a large bowl. Pour dressing over and toss to coat well. Cover and refrigerate at least 1 hour to allow coleslaw to “soften.” Stir well before serving.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 42 calories, Carbohydrates: 5 g, Protein: 1 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 217 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/salads/simple-coleslaw/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!
*Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

One of America’s Favorites – Baked Beans

July 4, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Baked beans over scrambled eggs on toast

Baked beans is a dish traditionally containing white beans that are parboiled and then, in the US, baked in sauce at low temperature for a lengthy period. In the United Kingdom, the dish is sometimes baked, but usually stewed in sauce. Canned baked beans are not baked, but are cooked through a steam process.

Baked beans originate in Native American cuisine, and are made from beans indigenous to the Americas. The dish was adopted and adapted by English colonists in New England in the 17th century and, through cookbooks published in the 19th century, spread to other regions of the United States and into Canada. Today, in the New England region of the United States, a variety of indigenous legumes are used in restaurants or in the home, such as Jacob’s cattle, soldier beans, yellow-eyed beans, and navy beans (also known as native beans).

Originally, Native Americans sweetened baked beans with maple syrup, a tradition some recipes still follow, but some English colonists used brown sugar beginning in the 17th century. In the 18th century, the convention of using American-made molasses as a sweetening agent became increasingly popular to avoid British taxes on sugar. Boston baked beans use a sauce prepared with molasses and salt pork, a dish whose popularity has given Boston the nickname “Beantown”.

Today, baked beans are served throughout the United States alongside barbecue foods and at picnics. Beans in a brown sugar, sugar, or corn syrup sauce (with or without tomatoes) are widely available throughout the United States. Bush Brothers are the largest producer. After the American Revolutionary War, Independence Day celebrations often included baked beans.

Canned baked beans are used as a convenience food; most are made from haricot beans (aka navy beans) in sauce. They may be eaten hot or cold, and straight from the can, as they are fully cooked. H. J. Heinz began producing canned baked beans in 1886. In the early 20th century, canned baked beans gained international popularity, particularly in the United Kingdom, where they have become a common part of an English full breakfast.

Three beanpots used for cooking homemade baked beans. The small one is glazed with the letters “Boston Baked Beans”

According to chef and food historian Walter Staib of Philadelphia’s City Tavern, baked beans had their roots as a Native peoples dish in the Americas long before the dish became known to Western culture. Native Americans mixed beans, maple sugar, and bear fat in earthenware pots which they placed in pits called “bean holes” which were lined in hot rocks to cook slowly over a long period of time.

British colonists in New England were the first westerners to adopt the dish from the Native peoples, and were quick to embrace it largely because the dish was reminiscent of pease porridge and because the dish used ingredients native to the New World. They substituted molasses or sugar for the maple syrup, bacon or ham for the bear fat, and simmered their beans for hours in pots over the fire instead of underground. Each colony in America had its own regional variations of the dish, with navy or white pea beans used in Massachusetts, Jacob’s Cattle and soldier beans used in Maine, and yellow-eyed beans in Vermont.[4] This variation likely resulted from the colonists receiving the dish from different Native peoples who used different native beans.

While some historians have theorized that baked beans had originated from the cassoulet or bean stew tradition in Southern France, this is unlikely as the beans used to make baked beans are all native to South America and were introduced to Europe around 1528. However, it is likely that English colonists used their knowledge of cassoulet cooking to modify the cooking technique of the beans from the traditional Native American version, by soaking the bean overnight and simmering the beans over a fire before baking it in earthen pots in order to decrease the cooking time.

A dish which was a clear precursor to baked beans, entitled “beans and bacon”, was known in medieval England. The addition of onion and mustard to some baked beans recipes published in New England in the 19th century was likely based on traditional cassoulet recipes from Staffordshire, England which utilized mustard, beans, and leeks. These ingredients are still often added to baked beans today. Nineteenth-century cookbooks published in New England, spread to other portions of the United States and Canada, which familiarized other people with the dish.

Beans on toast

While many recipes today are stewed, traditionally dried beans were soaked overnight, simmered until tender (parboiled), and then slow-baked in a ceramic or cast-iron beanpot. Originally baked beans were sweetened with maple syrup by Native Americans, a tradition some recipes still follow, but some English colonists modified the sweetening agent to brown sugar beginning in the 17th century. In the 18th century the convention of using American made molasses as a sweetening agent became increasingly popular in order to avoid British taxes on sugar. The molasses style of baked beans has become closely associated with the city of Boston and is often referred to as Boston baked beans.

Today in the New England region, baked beans are flavored either with maple syrup (Northern New England), or with molasses (Boston), and are traditionally cooked with salt pork in a beanpot in a brick oven for six to eight hours. In the absence of a brick oven, the beans were cooked in a beanpot nestled in a bed of embers placed near the outer edges of a hearth, about a foot away from the fire. Today, baked beans can be made in a slow cooker or in a modern oven using a traditional beanpot, Dutch oven, or casserole dish. The results of the dish, commonly described as having a savory-sweet flavor and a brownish- or reddish-tinted white bean, however, cooked are the same.

A tradition in Maine of “bean hole” cooking may have originated with the native Penobscot people and was later practiced in logging camps. A fire would be made in a stone-lined pit and allowed to burn down to hot coals, and then a pot with 11 pounds of seasoned beans would be placed in the ashes, covered over with dirt, and left to cook overnight or longer. These beans were a staple of Maine’s logging camps, served at every meal.

While baked beans was initially a New England region cuisine, the dish has become a popular item throughout the United States; and is now a staple item served most frequently along various types of barbecue and at picnics. This is due in part to the ease of handling, as they can be served hot or cold, directly from the can, making them handy for outdoor eating. The tomato-based sweet sauce also complements many types of barbecue. The already-cooked beans may also be baked in a casserole dish topped with slices of raw bacon, which is baked until the bacon is cooked. Additional seasonings are sometimes used, such as additional brown sugar or mustard to make the sauce more tangy.

 

A bowl of Beanie Weenies, also known as Franks and Beans or Beans and Wieners

Canned beans, often containing pork, were among the first convenience foods, and were exported and popularised by U.S. companies internationally in the early 20th century. The American Food and Drug Administration stated in 1996: “It has for years been recognized by consumers generally that the designation ‘beans with pork,’ or ‘pork and beans’ is the common or usual name for an article of commerce that contains very little pork.” The included pork is typically a piece of salt pork that adds fat to the dish.

The first mass-produced commercial canning of baked beans in the United States began in 1895 by the Pennsylvania-based H. J. Heinz Company. Heinz was also the first company to sell baked beans outside of the United States, beginning with sales limited solely to Fortnum & Mason in 1886, when the item was considered a luxury. They began selling baked beans throughout the UK in 1901, and baked beans became a standard part of the English full breakfast soon after. Heinz removed pork from the product during the Second World War rationing.

Originally, Heinz baked beans were prepared in the traditional United States manner for sales in Ireland and Great Britain. Over time, the recipe was altered to a less sweet tomato sauce without maple syrup, molasses, or brown sugar to appeal to the tastes of the United Kingdom. This is the version of baked beans most commonly eaten outside of the United States. Baked beans are commonly eaten on toast or as part of a full English, Scottish, or Irish breakfast.

Today, baked beans are a staple convenience food in the UK, often eaten as part of the modern full English breakfast and particularly on toast (called simply “beans on toast”). Heinz Baked Beans remains the best-selling brand in the UK. The Baked Bean Museum of Excellence in Port Talbot, Wales, is dedicated to baked beans.

 

In 2002, the British Dietetic Association allowed manufacturers of canned baked beans to advertise the product as contributing to the recommended daily consumption of five to six vegetables per person. This concession was criticized by heart specialists, who pointed to the high levels of sugar and salt in the product. However, it has been proven that consumption of baked beans does indeed lower total cholesterol levels and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, even in normo-cholesterolaemic individuals. Some manufacturers produce a “healthy” version of the product with reduced levels of sugar and salt.

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Recipe Rampage

Recipes without the fluff!

www.Kristi'sCountryKitchen.com

Gluten Free Baking Made Easy

C and C Dish

Mother and Daughter dish about recipes and whatever we want

What Jessi Eats

A girl on a journey. A journey to living a healthy lifestyle.

Battle Ready Women

A Faith Based Lifestyle Blog And Brand

PoPo Pigs Out

Cook. Eat. Share.

Millennial Cooks

Cooking and baking within a gluten-free and flexible dieting lifestyle

Married for the Meals

for the love of good food

Nimble Veggies

Fast Vegetarian Recipes From Around the World

Eden Recipes

Plant-based, whole-foods, (mostly) gluten-free

I Didn't H(ate) That

Culinary (Mis)adventures with an Enthusiastic Amateur

The Radish Room

totally RAD food

Buzymum

All Things Family, Health, Fitness, Education and Lifestyle

My Life and Spice

A journey of life, through food, family and travel.

Simple SIBO Recipes

SIBO Specific Diet Friendly Recipe Blog

The Columbo Game

... just one more thing.