One of America’s Favorites – Red Slaw

May 24, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Lexington (North Carolina) style barbecue (pulled pork) served with hushpuppies, baked beans and red slaw (lower right)

Red slaw (sometimes called barbecue slaw) is a condiment commonly served on hot dogs, on barbecue pork sandwiches, as a side dish for other types of barbecue, on hamburgers, or with other foods. It is an essential part of “Lexington style” North Carolina barbecue.

Red slaw is different from traditional coleslaw in that it does not use mayonnaise as an ingredient, allowing it to be stored for longer periods without refrigeration and making it more suitable for outdoor serving. It is made with green cabbage, vinegar, water and ketchup, giving it the characteristic color. In addition to being a staple part of Lexington style barbecue, it is also common in other portions of the Southeastern United States. In these regions, regular cole slaw may be called “white slaw” to differentiate it from red slaw.

Recipes vary widely and may include other ingredients, such as onion, sugar, black pepper, mustard seed and other spices, depending on the region in which it is being served.

In the late 1990s, Wendy’s sold the “Carolina Classic Burger” which was a traditional hamburger with red slaw, onions, chili and American cheese, going so far as to trademark the name.

Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Easy Macaroni And Cheese Recipe for Diabetics

September 27, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is Easy Macaroni And Cheese Recipe for Diabetics. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Elbow Macaroni, Fat-Free Half-and-Half, Velveeta Light Cheese, Better Buds – Butter Flavor Sprinkles, and Pepper. The Dish is 135 calories and 18 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Easy Macaroni And Cheese Recipe for Diabetics
If you’re in the mood for some quick and easy home cooking, you’ll love our mac and cheese — this twist on the kid-friendly classic is requires just five ingredients and is ready in only 25 minutes. Perfect for a busy weeknight!

Ingredients
Preparation time: 25 minutes

1 box (7 ounces) elbow macaroni
1/4 cup fat-free half-and-half
10 ounces light process cheese loaf, cubed (such as Velveeta Light)
1 1/2 teaspoons butter-flavor sprinkles (such as Butter Buds)
1/8 teaspoon pepper

Directions
Yield: 5 cups
Serving size: 1/2 cup

1 – Fill a two-quart pan two-thirds full of water. Bring to a boil, add macaroni, stir, and cook until tender (about 6–8 minutes). Drain well. Add half-and-half, cubed processed cheese, butter-flavor sprinkles, and pepper to the macaroni. Place over low heat and cook until cheese is melted; gently stir periodically.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 135 calories, Carbohydrates: 19 g, Protein: 8 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Sodium: 445 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/easy-macaroni-and-cheese/

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Simple Coleslaw Recipe

September 27, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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I have another Diabetic Friendly Side Dish to pass along, Simple Coleslaw Recipe. This one is made using Reduced-Fat Mayonnaise, Cider Vinegar, Celery Salt, Splenda, Cabbage, Purple Cabbage, and Carrots. This recipe is also from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Simple Coleslaw Recipe
A quintessential barbecue side, this quick and easy homemade coleslaw dish is the perfect addition to your next cookout. Requiring just five minutes and 10 minutes of preparation time, you can whip up a batch in a jiffy!

Ingredients
Preparation time: 10 minutes

2/3 cup reduced-fat mayonnaise
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
1 1/2 teaspoons Splenda artificial sweetener
1 bag (16 ounces) shredded coleslaw mix (cabbage, purple cabbage, carrot)

Directions
Yield: 4 1/2 cups
Serving size: 1/2 cup

1 – In a small bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, vinegar, celery salt, and Splenda. Place coleslaw mix in a large bowl. Pour dressing over and toss to coat well. Cover and refrigerate at least 1 hour to allow coleslaw to “soften.” Stir well before serving.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 42 calories, Carbohydrates: 5 g, Protein: 1 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 217 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/salads/simple-coleslaw/

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Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower with Sour Cream

December 10, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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What goes better with Meatloaf than Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower with Sour Cream. These are made using Baking Potatoes, Cauliflower, Reduced Fat Sour Cream, Chives, Salt, and Black Pepper. You can find this recipe, like the Meatloaf Recipe, at the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and More! So be sure to check it out today. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower with Sour Cream

Ingredients
12 ounces baking potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 2 1/2 cups)
1 1/4 pounds cauliflower, cut into 1-inch pieces (about 4 1/2 cups)
1/3 cup reduced-fat sour cream
1 tablespoon chives
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Directions
1 – Combine cauliflower and potatoes in large saucepan; cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer about 10 to 12 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Drain.

2 – Add sour cream, chives, salt, and pepper to saucepan. Using potato masher, mash until blended.

Yield: 6 servings.

Serving size: 1/2 cup.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 83 calories, Carbohydrates: 16 g, Protein: 4 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 7 mg, Sodium: 233 mg, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/mashed-potatoes-cauliflower-sour-cream/

One of America’s Favorites – Thanksgiving Dinner

November 25, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Thanksgiving Dinner

The centerpiece of contemporary Thanksgiving in the United States and in Canada is a large meal, generally centered on a large roasted turkey. It is served with a variety of side dishes which vary from traditional dishes such as mashed potatoes, stuffing, and cranberry sauce, to ones that reflect regional or cultural heritage. The majority of the dishes in the traditional American version of Thanksgiving dinner are made from foods native to the New World, as according to tradition the Pilgrims received these foods, or learned how to grow them, from the Native Americans. Thanksgiving dinner is the largest eating event in the United States; people eat more on Thanksgiving than on any other day of the year.

According to what traditionally is known as “The First Thanksgiving,” the 1621 feast between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag at Plymouth Colony contained waterfowl, venison, ham, lobster, clams, berries, fruit, pumpkin, and squash. William Bradford noted that, “besides waterfowl, there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many.” Many of the foods that were included in the first feast (except, notably, the seafood) have since gone on to become staples of the modern Thanksgiving dinner. Early feasts of the Order of Good Cheer, a French Canadian predecessor to the modern Thanksgiving, featured a potluck dinner with freshly-hunted fowl, game, and fish, hunted and shared by both French Canadians and local natives.

The use of the turkey in the US for Thanksgiving precedes Lincoln’s nationalization of the holiday in 1863. Alexander Hamilton proclaimed that no “Citizen of the United States should refrain from turkey on Thanksgiving Day,” and Benjamin Franklin had high regard for the wild turkey as an American icon, but turkey was uncommon as Thanksgiving fare until after 1800. By 1857, turkey had become part of the traditional dinner in New England.

The White House Cook Book, 1887, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette, et al., had the following menu: oysters on half shell, cream of chicken soup, fried smelts, sauce tartare, roast turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, baked squash, boiled onions, parsnip fritters, olives, chicken salad, venison pastry, pumpkin pie, mince pie, Charlotte russe, almond ice cream, lemon jelly, hickory nut cake, cheese, fruits and coffee.

A Thanksgiving Day dinner served to the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935 included: pickles, green olives, celery, roast turkey, oyster stew, cranberry sauce, giblet gravy, dressing, creamed asparagus tips, snowflake potatoes, baked carrots, hot rolls, fruit salad, mince meat pie, fruit cake, candies, grapes, apples, clams, fish, and many other food harvests. French drip coffee, cigars and cigarettes.

Sugar, among other food commodities, was rationed from 1942 to 1946. In 1947, as part of a voluntary rationing campaign, the Harry Truman Administration attempted to promote “Poultryless Thursdays,” discouraging Americans from eating poultry or egg products on Thursdays. Because Thanksgiving is always on a Thursday, this meant that turkey and pumpkin pie, two Thanksgiving staples, were discouraged, not only for that holiday, but for Christmas and New Year’s Day as well, since those holidays landed on Thursday in 1947. (Pumpkin pie was discouraged because it contained eggs.) The National Poultry and Egg Board furiously lobbied the President to cease promoting the plan; it culminated in a truce at the National Thanksgiving Turkey Presentation shortly before Thanksgiving. Turkey was no longer forbidden, but Eggless Thursdays remained for the rest of the year, meaning no pumpkin pie was served at the White House dinner that year.

Oven roasted turkey

Turkey is the most common main dish of a Thanksgiving dinner, to the point where Thanksgiving is sometimes colloquially called “Turkey Day.” In 2006, American turkey growers were expected to raise 270 million turkeys, to be processed into five billion pounds of turkey meat valued at almost $8 billion, with one third of all turkey consumption occurring in the Thanksgiving-Christmas season, and a per capita consumption of almost 18 pounds. The Broad Breasted White turkey is particularly bred for Thanksgiving dinner and similar large feasts; its large size (specimens can grow to over 40 pounds) and meat content make it ideal for such situations, although the breed must be artificially bred and suffers from health problems due to its size.

Most Thanksgiving turkeys are stuffed with a bread-based mixture and roasted. Sage is the traditional herb added to the stuffing, along with chopped celery, carrots, and onions. Other ingredients, such as chopped chestnuts or other tree nuts, crumbled sausage or bacon, cranberries, raisins, or apples, may be added to stuffing. If this mixture is prepared outside the bird, it may be known as dressing. Deep-fried turkey is rising in popularity due to its shorter preparation time, but carries safety risks.

The consumption of turkey on Thanksgiving is so ingrained in American culture that each year since 1947, the National Turkey Federation has presented a live turkey to the President of the United States prior to each Thanksgiving. These turkeys were initially slaughtered and eaten for the President’s Thanksgiving dinner; since 1989, the presented turkeys have typically been given a mock pardon to great fanfare and sent to a park to live out the rest of their usually short natural lives.

Non-traditional foods other than turkey are usually served as the main dish for a Thanksgiving dinner. Ham is often served alongside turkey in many non-traditional households. Goose and duck, foods which were traditional European centerpieces of Christmas dinners before being displaced, are now sometimes served in place of the Thanksgiving turkey. Sometimes, fowl native to the region where the meal is taking place is used; for example, an article in Texas Monthly magazine suggested quail as the main dish for a Texan Thanksgiving feast. John Madden, who appeared on television for the NFL Thanksgiving Day game from 1981 to 2001, frequently advocated his fondness for the turducken, deboned turkey, duck and chicken nested inside each other then cooked. In a few areas of the West Coast of the United States, Dungeness crab is common as an alternate main dish, as crab season starts in early November. Similarly, Thanksgiving falls within deer hunting season in the Northeastern United States, which encourages the use of venison as a centerpiece. Vegetarians or vegans may have a tofu, wheat gluten or lentil-based substitute; or stuffed squash. In Alaskan villages, whale meat is sometimes eaten. Irish immigrants have been known to have prime rib of beef as their centerpiece since beef in Ireland was once a rarity; families would save up money for this dish to signify newfound prosperity and hope. Many Italian-Americans will serve capon as the main course to the Thanksgiving meal.

In the United States, a globalist approach to Thanksgiving has become common with the impact of immigration. Basic “Thanksgiving” ingredients, or the intent of the holiday, can be transformed to a variety of dishes by using flavors, techniques, and traditions from their own cuisines. Others celebrate the holiday with a variety of dishes particularly when there is a crowd to be fed, guests’ tastes vary and considering the financial means available.

Many offerings are typically served alongside the main dish—so many that, because of the amount of food, the Thanksgiving meal is sometimes served midday or early afternoon to make time for all the eating, and preparation may begin at dawn or on days prior. Copious leftovers are also common following the meal proper.

Traditional Thanksgiving foods are sometimes specific to the day, such as riced potatoes, and although some of the foods might be seen at any semi-formal meal in the United States, the meal often has something of a ritual or traditional quality. Many Americans would say it is “incomplete” without cranberry sauce, stuffing or dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy, and brussels sprouts. Other commonly served dishes include winter squash and sweet potatoes, the latter often prepared with sweeteners such as brown sugar, molasses, or marshmallows. Fresh, canned, or frozen corn is popular and green beans are frequently served; in particular, green bean casserole, a product invented in 1955 by the Campbell Soup Company to promote use of its cream of mushroom soup, has become a Thanksgiving standard. Other roasted vegetables are often served, such as carrots or parsnips, celery stalks, beets, turnips, radishes, asparagus, Brussels sprouts or cauliflower. A fresh salad may be included, especially on the West Coast. A relish tray, with various pickles, olives, onions or peppers, is often included either with the meal itself or as a pre-meal appetizer. Bread rolls, biscuits, or cornbread, the latter particularly in the South and parts of New England, may also be served. For dessert, various pies are usually served, particularly pumpkin pie, though apple pie, mincemeat pie, sweet potato pie, cherry pie, chocolate pie, and pecan pie are often served as well.

There are also regional differences as to the stuffing or dressing traditionally served with the turkey. The traditional version has white bread cubes, sage, onion, celery and parsley. Southerners generally make their dressing from cornbread, while those in other parts of the country may opt for wheat or rye bread as the base. One or several of the following may be added to the dressing/stuffing: oysters, apples, chestnuts, raisins, and sausages or the turkey’s giblets.

Other dishes reflect the region or cultural background of those who have come together for the meal. For example, Sauerkraut (among those in the Mid-Atlantic; especially Baltimore) is

Green bean casserole

sometimes served. Many African Americans and Southerners serve baked macaroni and cheese and collard greens, along with chitterlings and sweet potato pie, while some Italian-Americans often have lasagne on the table and Ashkenazi Jews may serve noodle kugel, a sweet dessert pudding. Other Jewish families may consume foods commonly associated with Hanukkah, such as latkes or a sufganiyah; the two holidays are usually in close proximity and on extremely rare occasions overlap. It is not unheard of for Mexican Americans to serve their turkey with mole and roasted corn. In Puerto Rico, the Thanksgiving meal is completed with arroz con gandules (rice with pigeon peas) or arroz con maiz (rice with corn), pasteles (root tamales) stuffed with turkey, pumpkin-coconut crème caramel, corn bread with longaniza, potato salad, roasted white sweet potatoes and Spanish sparkling hard cider. Turkey in Puerto Rico is stuffed with mofongo. Cuban-Americans traditionally serve the turkey alongside a small roasted pork and include white rice and black beans or kidney beans. Vegetarians or vegans have been known to serve alternative entree centerpieces such as a large vegetable pie or a stuffed and baked pumpkin or tofu substitutes. Many Midwesterners (such as Minnesotans) of Norwegian or Scandinavian descent set the table with lefse.

The beverages at Thanksgiving can vary as much as the side dishes, often depending on who is present at the table and their tastes. Spirits or cocktails sometimes may be served before the main meal. On the dinner table, unfermented apple cider (still or sparkling) or wine are often served. Pitchers of sweet tea can often be found on Southern tables[citation needed]. Beaujolais nouveau is sometimes served; the beverage has been marketed as a Thanksgiving drink since the producers of the wine (which is made available only for a short window each year) set the annual release date to be one week before Thanksgiving beginning in 1985, and it is said to pair well with the wide variety of food served for Thanksgiving dinner. Thanksgiving marks the beginning of eggnog season.

 

Diabetic Dish of the Week – Butternut Squash and Apple Gratin

October 22, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is – Butternut Squash and Apple Gratin. Fall side dishes at its best with this week’s recipe of Butternut Squash and Apple Gratin. Made using Butternut Squash, Gala Apples, Dried Cranberries, Walnuts, Spices, Brown Sugar, Orange Juice, and Whole Wheat Bread Crumbs. You can find this recipe along with all the other Diabetic Friendly Recipes at the Diabetes Self Management website. You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. I love this Magazine, look forward to each issue. Always packed with Healthy and Delicious Recipes along with Diabetes Management Tips, Diabetes News and more! I left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Butternut Squash and Apple Gratin
Packed with nutrients such as vitamin A, vitamin C and potassium, this gratin makes a healthy and elegant side dish. And combining butternut squash, apples, cranberries and walnuts, it’s the quintessential fall food!

Ingredients
3 cups diced peeled butternut squash
1 1/2 cups diced peeled firm Gala apple
3 tablespoons dried sweetened cranberries
3 tablespoons chopped walnuts
2 teaspoons packed brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt (optional)
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 cup orange juice
1/2 cup fresh whole wheat bread crumbs*
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 400°F. Spray 9-inch pie plate with nonstick cooking spray.

2 – Steam squash in steamer basket over boiling water 5 minutes or until tender.

3 – Combine butternut squash, apple, cranberries, walnuts, brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, if desired, and pepper in large bowl; gently mix. Pour in orange juice. Spoon evenly into prepared pie plate.

4 – Cover and bake 20 minutes or until squash and apple are fork-tender.

5 – Meanwhile, combine bread crumbs and butter in small bowl; mix well. Sprinkle evenly over apple mixture. Bake, uncovered, 10 minutes or until topping is golden brown.

*Note. To make fresh bread crumbs, tear 1 slice bread into pieces; process in food processor until coarse crumbs form.

Yield: 6 servings.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 150 calories, Carbohydrates: 26 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 5 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Cholesterol: 5 mg, Sodium: 70 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/butternut-squash-and-apple-gratin/

 

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Grilled Broccoli Rabe

September 3, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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I’ve got a perfect Diabetic Friendly side dish for that Grilled Salmon, Grilled Broccoli Rabe. You’ve already got the grill fired up for the Salmon so just go ahead and prepare a side dish too.Easy to prepare and all you’ll need is the Broccoli Rabe along with with Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Kosher Salt, and Crushed Red Pepper. This recipe is also from the Diabetes Self Management website! A fantastic recipe site so be sure to check it out. So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Grilled Broccoli Rabe
In a rush to make dinner?
This quick and easy broccoli rabe recipe is packed with nutrition — and flavor!

Sometimes, you don’t have the time to cook fresh vegetables but luckily our grilled broccoli rabe is an easy alternative.

Ingredients
1 bunch broccoli rabe, tough lower stems removed
Extra virgin olive oil
Kosher salt
Pinch of crushed red pepper

Directions
1 – Immerse the rabe in a large bowl of tap water and let it hang out for 10 to 15 minutes.

2 – Preheat the grill to medium.

3 – Drain the rabe but DO NOT shake off the excess water. Toss the rabe with olive oil and salt and lay it on the grill in an even layer.

4 – Cook the rabe for 3 to 4 minutes per side, turning as needed so all sides grill. The rabe should start to soften and char. If it starts to char too quickly, spray or shake a few drops of water on it.

5 – When the rabe is tender, remove it from the grill, drizzle with a bit more olive oil, and add a sprinkey-dink of salt and crushed red pepper. Serve hot or at room temp.

Yield: 4 servings.

Serving size: 1/4 of recipe.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 59 calories, Carbohydrates: 3 g, Protein: 4 g, Fat: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 274 mg, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/grilled-broccoli-rabe/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

August 3, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Stock the freezer …………..

Stock the freezer with frozen vegetables. What happens when the kale has turned, and you don’t have a backup side dish? No need to skip a beat. Open up the freezer and grab some frozen veggies for steaming. It’s simple, fast and healthy.

Farmers’ Market Potato Salad

July 23, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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For a healthy and Diabetes Friendly recipe to go with the Surfin’ Salmon, I have a Farmers’ Market Potato Salad to go with it. To make this side dish you’ll need; Pickled Red Onions, Green Beans, Assorted Potatoes, Nonfat Greek Yogurt, White Wine Vinegar, Olive Oil, Spicy Mustard, and Salt. One delicious kicked up Potato Salad! This recipe also comes from the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Farmers’ Market Potato Salad

Ingredients
Pickled Red Onions (recipe here)
2 cups cubed assorted potatoes (purple, baby red, Yukon Gold, and/or a combination)
1 cup green beans, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 tablespoons plain nonfat Greek yogurt
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon spicy mustard
1 teaspoon salt

Directions
1 – Prepare Pickled Red Onions.

2 – Bring large saucepan of water to a boil. Add potatoes; cook 5 to 8 minutes or until fork-tender. Add green beans during last 4 minutes of cooking time. Drain potatoes and green beans.

3 – Stir yogurt, vinegar, oil, mustard, and salt in large bowl until smooth and well blended.

4 – Add potatoes, green beans, and Pickled Red Onions to dressing; gently toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate at least 1 hour to allow flavors to develop before serving.

Yield: 6 servings.

Serving size: 1/6 of recipe.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 107 calories, Carbohydrates: 13 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 5 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 628 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/farmers-market-potato-salad/

ROASTED CARROTS AND PARSNIPS

April 30, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in carrots, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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I have a perfect Diabetic Friendly Side Dish to go with the HERB-RUBBED BEEF ROAST WITH ROASTED CAULIFLOWER for your Easter Dinner, ROASTED CARROTS AND PARSNIPS. Easy to prepare and only 90 calories per serving! Make your Easter Dinner not only a Delicious one but a Healthy one also. It’s another one from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. Check out the Diabetic Gourmet site for a fantastic selection of Diabetic Friendly recipes, news, and tips. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

ROASTED CARROTS AND PARSNIPS

Ingredients

1 pound carrots, peeled
1 pound parsnips, peeled
2 tablespoons olive oil
salt and pepper, to taste
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

Directions

1 – Heat oven to 425F.
2 – Cut carrots and parsnips in half then in half lengthwise.
3 – Place on large rimmed baking pan toss with olive oil.
4 – Season with salt and pepper.
5 – Bake 30 to 40 minutes or until parsnips are tender, stirring once.
6 – Sprinkle with parsley.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 90
Fat: 3.5 grams
Saturated Fat: 0.5 grams
Fiber: 4 grams
Sodium: 40 milligrams
Protein: 1 grams
Carbohydrates: 14 grams
Sugars: 5 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/roasted-carrots-and-parsnips

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