It’s Nuts I tell you ….ORGANIC SPROUTED BLACK CHIA

March 14, 2019 at 5:02 AM | Posted in nuts, NUTS COM | Leave a comment
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This week from the nuts.com website (https://nuts.com/) its ORGANIC SPROUTED BLACK CHIA. The seeds are great for for smoothies, pudding, snacking, cooking and baking. This is just one of many different Chia Seeds that you can find at the Nuts site (https://nuts.com/) Besides the Chia Seeds you can choose from items like; NUTS and SEEDS, DRIED FRUIT, POWDERS, CHOCOLATES and SWEETS, SNACKS, COFFEE and TEA, COOKING, BAKING, and GIFTS. Plus there’s FREE 1-2 day shipping on orders over $59, see for details! Be sure to check the site out today! Now more on the ORGANIC SPROUTED BLACK CHIA. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One!

 

 

 

ORGANIC SPROUTED BLACK CHIA
Incredible, edible chia! Organic Sprouted Black Chia is a next level way to enjoy this stupendous seed. These chia seeds have undergone the sprouting process which increases the bioavailability of key nutrients in chia such as protein, fiber and antioxidants. You can enjoy conventional chia’s sprouted siblings in all the same satisfying ways. In case you need some ideas….

Uses for Organic Sprouted Chia
Add a thick texture and nutrients to jams or juices Supercharge a smoothie Mix with water for a vegan egg replacer in recipes Combine with fruit and nondairy milk for a chia pudding

Sprouted Foods in a Nutshell
New to sprouted foods? Let us plant the seed for ya! In fact, each little granule of this product started out as seeds; think tree nuts, grains or legumes. Unlike the standard seed growing process, sprouted seeds are germinated, which means they’re soaked and rinsed until they grow small tail-like ends. At that point, enzymes within the plant are activated and the sprouted seed reaches its full nutrient potential; meaning it contains more fiber, protein and nutrients than unsprouted plants.

Why Shout For Sprouts:
* Easy to digest
* Packed with easy-to-absorb vitamins, minerals and antioxidants
* Reduces inflammation
* Great for gluten sensitive diets
* Taste just as delicious as unsprouted foods
* Great for snacking, cooking and baking

Nutrition Facts
Serving size 28g (~1 oz.)

Amount per serving
Calories 149
Calories from Fat 79
%DV
Total Fat 9g 14%
Saturated Fat 1g 4%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 6mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 11g 4%
Dietary Fiber 10g 40%
Sugars 0g
Protein 6g
https://nuts.com/cookingbaking/chia-seeds/organic-sprouted.html

 

Order securely online or call us:
800-558-6887 or 908-523-0333
Operating Hours (ET):
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F-S 8AM-6:30PM
https://nuts.com/

It’s Nuts I tell you………..ORGANIC QUINOA

August 2, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in nuts | Leave a comment
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This week off the nuts.com website (https://nuts.com/) its ORGANIC QUINOA. Quinoa is a light and edible seed similar to grains and contains nearly twice as much dietary fiber as other grains. Quinoa is just one of the grains and organic items you can find at the Nuts site (https://nuts.com/) They have a great variety of items like; NUTS, DRIED FRUIT, CHOCOLATES and SWEETS, SNACKS, COFFEE and TEA, COOKING and BAKING, and GIFTS. Plus there’s FREE shipping on orders over $59, see for details. Now more on the ORGANIC QUINOA. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://nuts.com/

 

 

ORGANIC QUINOA
Quinoa (pronounced keen-wah) is a light, fluffy, edible seed that feels and tastes more like a grain. Our organic quinoa is pre-rinsed so it is ready for cooking! Thanks to its mild, somewhat nutty and irresistible flavor, organic quinoa is an immensely popular food. But this “mother grain” is also valued for its tremendous nutritional content.

How to Cook Quinoa
To cook quinoa, just combine one part of our quinoa with two parts water or broth, bring the mixture to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes. Fluff it with a fork, and it’s delicious and ready to serve as-is or with your choice of seasonings.

Quinoa Nutrition
This power-packed nutritional combo helped give quinoa the name “Gold of the Incas” when it was cultivated thousands of years ago in the Andes; Incan warriors highly valued the crop for the energy and stamina it gave them.

Among the wholesome attributes that make the organic quinoa grain special are:

1) Quinoa is considered a complete protein because it contains all 9 essential amino acids. A one-cup serving of cooked organic quinoa contains 12-18% Daily Value (DV) for protein, which is more than any grain. In particular, organic quinoa contains lysine, an amino acid that most grains lack. Lysine helps the body absorb calcium and reduces stress-induced anxiety.

2) According to the USDA, quinoa contains nearly twice as much dietary fiber as other grains. A serving of organic quinoa has about 20% DV for dietary fiber, which supports a healthy digestive system by speeding up the passage of food and waste. It also keeps you feeling full longer to prevent overeating and promote weight loss.

3) Organic quinoa is a good source of minerals like phosphorous, magnesium and iron. Phosphorous is important for bone formation, kidney health, and muscle strength. Magnesium controls blood glucose levels, aids the absorption of calcium, and regulates blood pressure. Iron helps deliver oxygen-rich blood cells throughout the body……….
https://nuts.com/cookingbaking/grains/quinoa/white.html

Order securely online or call us:
800-558-6887 or 908-523-0333
Operating Hours (ET):
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S-S 9AM-6PM
https://nuts.com/

Healthy Spring Recipes

March 25, 2016 at 5:21 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website it’s Healthy Spring Recipes. It’s the first week of the Spring Season so to help you start it off healthy some delicious and diabetic friendly recipes! Recipes that include; Mahi Mahi with Remoulade, Hibiscus and Goji Tea, and Toasted Seeds with Golden Berry and Cocoa Nibs. Get them all at the Diabetic Living Online website. http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Healthy Spring RecipesDiabetic living logo

Looking for some healthy, flavorful spring recipes? You’ll love these quick-fix meals, exotic island dishes, decadent desserts, and yummy snacks.

 

 

Mahi Mahi with Remoulade

Topped with a fresh-flavor remoulade, grilled Mahi Mahi is a go-to recipe for warmer weather. Plus, this fish is low in saturated fat. Pair with grilled asparagus for a deliciously nutritious meal……

 
Hibiscus and Goji Tea

Drink this naturally sweetened ice tea on a warm day. Along with hibiscus flowers and cinnamon sticks, this tea is made with goji berries, which are high in vitamin C…..

 
Toasted Seeds with Golden Berry and Cocoa Nibs

Choose dried golden berries or raisins to add a touch of sweetness to this low-carb snack. Mix it together on the weekend to give you an easy, healthy treat to munch on during a busy week……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Spring Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/popular/healthy-spring-recipes?page=0

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 16, 2015 at 5:46 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When possible use Roasted Seeds and Nuts in recipes….

 

They give nuttiness and texture. They are packed with omega 3 and 6, and also iron in the case of poppy seeds. Roasting seeds will bring out their flavor.

Herb and Spice of the Week – Coriander

August 28, 2014 at 5:46 AM | Posted in Herb and Spice of the Week | Leave a comment
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Coriander leaves

Coriander leaves

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum), also known as cilantro, Chinese parsley or dhania, is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. Coriander is native to regions spanning from southern Europe and North Africa to southwestern Asia. It is a soft plant growing to 20 in tall. The leaves are variable in shape, broadly lobed at the base of the plant, and slender and feathery higher on the flowering stems. The flowers are borne in small umbels, white or very pale pink, asymmetrical, with the petals pointing away from the center of the umbel longer (5–6 mm or 0.20–0.24 in) than those pointing toward it (only 1–3 mm or 0.039–0.118 in long). The fruit is a globular, dry schizocarp 3–5 mm (0.12–0.20 in) in diameter. Although sometimes eaten alone, the seeds often are used as a spice or an added ingredient in other foods.

 
All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the parts most traditionally used in cooking. Coriander is common in South Asian, Southeast Asian, Indian, Middle Eastern, Caucasian, Central Asian, Mediterranean, Tex-Mex, Latin American, Portuguese, Chinese, African, and Scandinavian cuisine.

 

 
The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, fresh coriander, Chinese parsley, or (in North America) cilantro.

It should not be confused with culantro (Eryngium foetidum L.), an apiaceae like coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) but in a different genus. Culantro has a distinctly different spiny appearance, a much more potent volatile leaf oil and a stronger smell.

The leaves have a different taste from the seeds, with citrus overtones. However, many people experience an unpleasant soapy taste or a rank smell and avoid the leaves. The flavors have also been compared to those of the stink bug, and similar chemical groups are involved (aldehydes). The different perceptions of the coriander leaves’ taste is likely genetic, with some people having no response to the aromatic chemical that most find pleasant, while simultaneously being sensitive to certain offending unsaturated aldehydes.

The fresh leaves are an ingredient in many Indian foods (such as chutneys and salads); in Chinese and Thai dishes; in Mexican cooking, particularly in salsa and guacamole and as a garnish; and in salads in Russia and other CIS countries. Chopped coriander leaves are a garnish on Indian dishes such as dal. As heat diminishes their flavor, coriander leaves are often used raw or added to the dish immediately before serving. In Indian and Central Asian recipes, coriander leaves are used in large amounts and cooked until the flavor diminishes. The leaves spoil quickly when removed from the plant, and lose their aroma when dried or frozen.

 

 

 

Dried coriander fruits

Dried coriander fruits

The dry fruits are known as coriander seeds. In Indian cuisine they are called dhania.

The word coriander in food preparation may refer solely to these seeds (as a spice), rather than to the plant. The seeds have a lemony citrus flavor when crushed, due to terpenes linalool and pinene. It is described as warm, nutty, spicy, and orange-flavoured.

The variety C. s. vulgare has a fruit diameter of 3–5 mm (0.12–0.20 in), while var. microcarpum fruits have a diameter of 1.5–3 mm (0.059–0.118 in). Large-fruited types are grown mainly by tropical and subtropical countries, e.g. Morocco, India and Australia, and contain a low volatile oil content (0.1-0.4%). They are used extensively for grinding and blending purposes in the spice trade. Types with smaller fruit are produced in temperate regions and usually have a volatile oil content of around 0.4-1.8%, so are highly valued as a raw material for the preparation of essential oil.

It is commonly found both as whole dried seeds and in ground form. Roasting or heating the seeds in a dry pan heightens the flavor, aroma and pungency. Ground coriander seed loses flavor quickly in storage and is best ground fresh. Coriander seed is a spice in garam masala and Indian curries which often employ the ground fruits in generous amounts together with cumin, acting as a thickener.

 

 

 

Roasted coriander seeds, called dhana dal, are eaten as a snack. They are the main ingredient of the two south Indian dishes: sambhar and rasam.

Outside of Asia, coriander seed is used widely in the process for pickling vegetables. In Germany and South Africa, the seeds are used while making sausages. In Russia and Central Europe, coriander seed is an occasional ingredient in rye bread (e.g. borodinsky bread), as an alternative to caraway.

The Zuni people have adapted it into their cuisine, mixing the powdered seeds ground with chile and using it as a condiment with meat, and eating leaves as a salad.

Coriander seeds are used in brewing certain styles of beer, particularly some Belgian wheat beers. The coriander seeds are used with orange peel to add a citrus character.

 

 

 

Coriander plants

Coriander plants

The nutritional profile of coriander seeds is different from the fresh stems and leaves. Leaves are particularly rich in vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin K, with moderate content of dietary minerals. Although seeds generally have lower content of vitamins, they do provide significant amounts of dietary fiber, calcium, selenium, iron, magnesium and manganese.

Coriander roots have a deeper, more intense flavor than the leaves. They are used in a variety of Asian cuisines. They are commonly used in Thai dishes, including soups and curry pastes.
Coriander, like many spices, contains phytochemicals which may delay or prevent the spoilage of food seasoned with this spice.

Chemicals derived from coriander leaves were found to have potential for antibacterial activity against Salmonella choleraesuis, and this activity was found to be caused in part by chemicals acting as nonionic surfactants. The essential oil produced from Coriandrum sativum has been shown to exhibit possible antimicrobial effects.

Coriander can produce an allergic reaction in some people.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 8, 2014 at 8:34 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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It’s easy to turn bulk foods into convenience foods, ensuring that you don’t get frustrated and start buying those always-expensive prepackaged snacks. Invest in a big box of sandwich bags and spend some time at the beginning of the week filling them with carrot sticks, strips of mozzarella (which is the same thing as string cheese), or granola. It’s also easy to make trail mix by purchasing nuts,seeds, and dried fruits and combining them.

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