One of America’s Favorites – Sauerkraut

December 31, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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German sauerkraut

Sauerkraut (/ˈsaʊ.ərkraʊt/; German: [ˈzaʊɐˌkʁaʊt] is finely cut raw cabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria. It has a long shelf life and a distinctive sour flavor, both of which result from the lactic acid formed when the bacteria ferment the sugars in the cabbage leaves.

Fermented foods have a long history in many cultures, with sauerkraut being one of the most well-known instances of traditional fermented moist cabbage side dishes. The Roman writers Cato (in his De Agri Cultura) and Columella (in his De re Rustica) mentioned preserving cabbages and turnips with salt.

Sauerkraut originally came from China, from where it was brought over to Europe by the Tatars. The Tatars improved upon the original Chinese recipe by fermenting it with salt instead of rice wine. Another claim is that the dish was brought over by the Mongol Emperor Genghis Khan. It then took root mostly in Central and Eastern European cuisines, but also in other countries including the Netherlands, where it is known as zuurkool, and France, where the name became choucroute. The English name is borrowed from German where it means literally “sour herb” or “sour cabbage”. The names in Slavic and other Central and Eastern European languages have similar meanings with the German word: “fermented cabbage” (Albanian: lakër turshi, Belarusian: квашаная капуста, Czech: kysané zelí, Polish: kiszona kapusta or kwaszona kapusta, Lithuanian: rauginti kopūstai, Russian: квашеная капуста, tr. kvashenaya kapusta, Ukrainian: квашена капуста) or “sour cabbage” (Bulgarian: кисело зеле, Croatian: kiselo zelje, Czech: kyselé zelí, Estonian: hapukapsas, Finnish: hapankaali, Hungarian: savanyúkáposzta, Latvian: skābēti kāposti, Romanian: varză murată, Russian: кислая капуста, tr. kislaya kapusta, Serbian: kiseli kupus, Slovak: kyslá kapusta, Slovene: kislo zelje, Ukrainian: кисла капуста, kisla kapusta).

Before frozen foods, refrigeration, and cheap transport from warmer areas became readily available in northern, central and eastern Europe, sauerkraut – like other preserved foods – provided a source of nutrients during the winter. James Cook always took a store of sauerkraut on his sea voyages, since experience had taught him it prevented scurvy.

The word “Kraut”, derived from this food, is a derogatory term for the German people. During World War I, due to concerns the American public would reject a product with a German name, American sauerkraut makers relabeled their product as “Liberty Cabbage” for the duration of the war.

Homemade sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is made by a process of pickling called lactic acid fermentation that is analogous to how traditional (not heat-treated) pickled cucumbers and kimchi are made. The cabbage is finely shredded, layered with salt, and left to ferment. Fully cured sauerkraut keeps for several months in an airtight container stored at 15 °C (60 °F) or below. Neither refrigeration nor pasteurization is required, although these treatments prolong storage life.

Fermentation by lactobacilli is introduced naturally, as these air-borne bacteria culture on raw cabbage leaves where they grow. Yeasts also are present, and may yield soft sauerkraut of poor flavor when the fermentation temperature is too high. The fermentation process has three phases, collectively sometimes referred to as population dynamics. In the first phase, anaerobic bacteria such as Klebsiella and Enterobacter lead the fermentation, and begin producing an acidic environment that favors later bacteria. The second phase starts as the acid levels become too high for many bacteria, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides and other Leuconostoc spp. take dominance. In the third phase, various Lactobacillus species, including L. brevis and L. plantarum, ferment any remaining sugars, further lowering the pH. Properly cured sauerkraut is sufficiently acidic to prevent a favorable environment for the growth of Clostridium botulinum, the toxins of which cause botulism.

A 2004 genomic study found an unexpectedly large diversity of lactic acid bacteria in sauerkraut, and that previous studies had oversimplified this diversity. Weissella was found to be a major organism in the initial, heterofermentative stage, up to day 7. It was also found that Lactobacillus brevis and Pediococcus pentosaceus had smaller population numbers in the first 14 days than previous studies had reported.

The Dutch sauerkraut industry found that inoculating a new batch of sauerkraut with an old batch resulted in an excessively sour product. This sourdough process is known as “backslopping” or “inoculum enrichment”; when used in making sauerkraut, first- and second-stage population dynamics, important to developing flavor, are bypassed. This is due primarily to the greater initial activity of species L. plantarum.

Regional varieties

Eastern European style sauerkraut pickled with carrots and served as a salad

In Belarusian, Polish, Russian, Baltic country and Ukrainian cuisine, chopped cabbage is often pickled together with shredded carrots. Other ingredients may include whole or quartered apples for additional flavor or cranberry for flavor and better keeping (the benzoic acid in cranberries is a common preservative). Bell peppers and beets are added in some recipes for color. The resulting sauerkraut salad is typically served cold, as a zakuski or a side dish. There is also a home made type of very mild sauerkraut where white cabbage is pickled with salt in a refrigerator for only between three and seven days. This results in very little lactic acid being produced. Sometimes in Russia the double fermentation is used, with the initial step producing an exceptionally sour product, which is then “corrected” by adding 30-50% more fresh cabbage and fermenting the mix again. The flavor additives like apples, beets, cranberries and sometimes even watermelons are usually introduced at this step.

Many health benefits have been claimed for sauerkraut:

* It is a source of vitamins B, C, and K; the fermentation process increases the bioavailability of nutrients rendering sauerkraut even more nutritious than the original cabbage. It is also low in calories and high in calcium and magnesium, and it is a very good source of dietary fiber, folate, iron, potassium, copper and manganese.
* If unpasteurized and uncooked, sauerkraut also contains live lactobacilli and beneficial microbes and is rich in enzymes. Fiber and probiotics improve digestion and promote the growth of healthy bowel flora, protecting against many diseases of the digestive tract.
* During the American Civil War, the physician John Jay Terrell (1829–1922) was able to successfully reduce the death rate from disease among prisoners of war; he attributed this to feeding his patients raw sauerkraut.
* Sauerkraut and its juice is a time-honored folk remedy for canker sores. The treatment is to rinse the mouth with sauerkraut juice for about 30 seconds several times a day, or place a wad of sauerkraut against the affected area for a minute or so before chewing and swallowing the sauerkraut.
* In 2002, the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry reported that Finnish researchers found the isothiocyanates produced in sauerkraut fermentation inhibit the growth of cancer cells in test tube and animal studies. A Polish study in 2010 concluded that “induction of the key detoxifying enzymes by cabbage juices, particularly sauerkraut, may be responsible for their chemopreventive activity demonstrated by epidemiological studies and in animal models”.
* Sauerkraut is high in the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, both associated with preserving ocular health.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Runza

September 3, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 4 Comments
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A runza (also called a bierock, krautburger, fleischkuche, or kraut pirok) is a yeast dough bread pocket with a filling consisting of beef, cabbage or sauerkraut, onions, and seasonings. They are baked in various shapes such as a half-moon, rectangle, round (bun), square, or triangle. At Runza restaurants, the runza is baked in a rectangular shape. The bierocks of Kansas, on the other hand, are generally baked in the shape of a bun.

The runza sandwich originated in Russia during the 1800s and spread to Germany before appearing in the United States. Bierock comes from the Russian pirogi or pirozhki and is the term for any food consisting of a savory filling-stuffed dough. The recipe was passed down from generation to generation and is available throughout the Americas, particularly Argentina and the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba. The recipe was spread throughout the United States by the Volga Germans (Germans from Russia) and can be found in Colorado, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Kansas, Oklahoma and California.

The term “runza” is registered as a trademark in the United States by Nebraska-based Runza restaurants.

 

Wisconsin Beer Turkey Brat

June 1, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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I’ve got another Delicious and Healthy Jennie – O Turkey Brat recipe to share with all of you, Wisconsin Beer Turkey Brat. We’ve had this a couple of times and love them! You’ll be using the JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Bratwurst with toppings of Mustard, Sauerkraut, and Fried Onions. The recipe calls for 3 cups of Beer to simmer the Brats in before grilling them. I’ve found a Light Lager Beer gives them the most flavor. You can use any Beer for it though. You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website along with all the other Delicious and Healthy recipes. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

Wisconsin Beer Turkey Brat

INGREDIENTS
3 cups beer
1 (19.5-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Bratwurst
¼ cup mustard
5 reduced-calorie hot dog buns, split
1 cup sauerkraut
½ cup fried onions

DIRECTIONS
1) In large saucepan over medium heat, bring beer to simmer. Add brats. Simmer, covered, over low heat 20 to 25 minutes.
2) Prepare grill. Cook brats as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer.
3) Spread mustard on buns. Add brats. Top with sauerkraut and fried onions.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 260
Protein 19g
Carbohydrates 23g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 5g
Fat 10g
Cholesterol 65mg
Sodium 1000mg
Saturated Fat 3g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/709-wisconsin-beer-turkey-brat

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – REUBEN SANDWICH

May 23, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is a REUBEN SANDWICH. To make this recipe you can use either the Wild Idea Buffalo Pastrami or Corned Buffalo Brisket. With topping of Sauerkraut, Irish Cheddar Cheese, and Reuben Sauce then served on Pumpernickel Bread. The Reuben Sandwich just got better! You can find this recipe and purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Pastrami or Corned Buffalo Brisket. You can purchase any of the Wild Idea Products and be sure to check out out all their delicious and healthy recipes Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

REUBEN SANDWICH
The O’Brien household’s version of this pub favorite. So good, it will become a weekly request!

Serves 4

Ingredients:

1 package Buffalo Pastrami or Corned Buffalo Brisket
1 ½ cup “Bubbies” Sauerkraut (it’s really, really good)
4 ounces Irish Cheddar Cheese
6 slices Pumpernickel Bread
1 tablespoon Butter
*Reuben Sauce

Preparation:
1 – On flat top griddle or in a large sauté pan over medium heat place Buffalo Pastrami in lightly oiled pan to heat through. Turn while heating.
2 – Arrange Buffalo Pastrami in 4 equal piles and top with cheese. Add sauerkraut to the pan too. Cover and heat until cheese is melted, and sauerkraut is warm.
3 – Remove from pan and cover to keep warm.
4 – Spread butter on one side of the bread and grill bread until golden brown.
5 – Stack meat, cheese and kraut on inside of grilled bread and spread the other slice with *Rueben sauce (recipe below), and sandwich together.
Serve with Potato, Leek Soup.

*Rueben Sauce

Ingredients:

1/2 cup Mayonnaise
¼ cup Salsa
¼ cup Roasted and Peeled Red Peppers
Salt
Pepper

Preparation:
1 – Place all ingredients in food processor and puree.
2 – Season with slat & pepper to taste.

https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/93476289-buffalo-pastrami-reuben-sandwich

Healthy European Recipes

December 16, 2017 at 7:23 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy European Recipes. Delicious and Healthy European Recipes like; Chicken, Sauerkraut, and Apple Panini, Salmon and Fall Vegetables with Bagna Cauda, and Spanish Chicken Stew. Find these and all the others at the EatingWell website. Also don’t forget to subscribe to the EatingWell Magazine. I’ve been getting the Magazine for years and have found so many fantastic recipes! So Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

Healthy European Recipes
Find healthy, delicious European recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Chicken, Sauerkraut, and Apple Panini
These flavor-packed grilled sandwiches get plenty of fiber from cabbage, apple and whole-wheat bread…..

Salmon and Fall Vegetables with Bagna Cauda
In this family-style meal, a platter full of salmon and roasted and raw vegetables—served with a Northern Italian-inspired garlic-anchovy dip—lets everyone choose their own dining adventure. Serve with crusty bread and white wine……

Spanish Chicken Stew
Olives give grand flavor to this Spanish-inspired chicken dinner, conveniently made in the slow cooker. Serve with bread sticks, if desired…….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy European Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18313/cuisines-regions/european/

Ohio Festivals October 13th – 15th, 2017

October 11, 2017 at 5:29 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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October 10-14, 2017 Annual Bradford Pumpkin Show – Bradford, Ohio
Parades, pageant, bread & pie contests, Cornhole Tournament, Kiddie Tractor Pull, Pumpkin Parade, Pumpkin Art, talent show and much more!
http://www.bradfordpumpkinshow.org/index.html

 

October 14, 2017 Yellow Springs Street Fair – Yellow Springs, Ohio
9am to 5pm, with entertainment throughout the Village. Over 200 booths. Two Music Stages, a Beer Garden and Street Performers throughout town. For children, Primary Languages will have free crafts along with face painting and cookie decorating with donations going to the Dayton International School. A festival like no other.
http://www.yellowspringsohio.org/street-fair/

 

October 14-15, 2017
48th Annual Ohio Sauerkraut Festival
Waynesville, Ohio
The Ohio Sauerkraut Festival has grown from a small local event in 1970 to one of the premier craft festivals in the nation. We jury our 450+ vendors to ensure that all items are handcrafted, and select items based on quality and variety. Our unique food offerings range from sauerkraut pizza to fudge. Visitors return year after year to sample their favorites, making the Ohio Sauerkraut Festival a favorite Midwest destination. Always the Second Full Weekend of October.
http://www.sauerkrautfestival.com/

 

October 14-15, 2017 Oak Harbor Apple Festival – Oak Harbor, Ohio
Something for everyone! Pageant, parade, tractor pulling contest, baking contest, talent show, classic car show, 5K Apple Run, youth football game and local performers. Attendance: 25,000+.
http://www.oakharborohio.net/

47th Annual Ohio Sauerkraut Festival – October 8th – 9th, 2016

October 6, 2016 at 9:27 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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Welcome to the 47th Annual Ohio Sauerkraut Festivalsauerkraut-fest-2016

The Ohio Sauerkraut Festival has grown from a small local event in 1970 to one of the premier craft festivals in the nation. We jury our 450+ vendors to ensure that all items are handcrafted, and select items based on quality and variety.

Our unique food offerings range from sauerkraut pizza to fudge. Visitors return year after year to sample their favorites, making the Ohio Sauerkraut Festival a favorite Midwest destination.

The Ohio Sauerkraut Festival is a top ranked event featuring an eclectic mix of arts and crafts from sculptures to ceramics to paintings to woodworking, and more, providing you with the opportunity to find unique gifts for you or for those on your holiday list. And with all of the crowds in the streets, it’s a perfect time to shop along the resident stores.

The Ohio Sauerkraut Festival serves 7 tons of sauerkraut and attracts approximately 350,000 visitors each year to browse among the over 450 craft booths and sample the offerings from more than 30 different food booths. It continues to be one of the top quality festivals in the United States, attracting visitors and vendors from every state across the Nation. Vendors come from as far as Hawaii, Florida and California to participate in the festival.

2016 Festival Dates

October 8th 9:00am – 8:00pm
October 9th 9:00am – 6:00pm

Location

10B North Main Street (physical address)

PO Box 281 (mailing address)

Waynesville, OH 45068

http://www.sauerkrautfestival.com/

Mean while back on the SayersBrook Bison Ranch…… Crazy Buffalo Meatballs

October 1, 2016 at 5:01 AM | Posted in SayersBrook Ranch | Leave a comment
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sayersbrook

From the SayersBrook Bison Ranch we have a recipe for Bison Meatballs, Crazy Buffalo Meatballs. These are made using Ground Bison Burger, Eggs, Bread Crumbs, and a package of Lipton Onion Soup Mix. You can find this recipe on the SayersBrook website and you can purchase any of the SayersBrook cuts of Meat. You can select from Bison, Elk, Ostrich, Wild Boar, just to name a few. So check their site out soon, Eat Healthy! http://www.sayersbrook.com/

 
Crazy Buffalo Meatballs

Ingredients:
2 lbs. Ground Bison Burgercrazy-buffalo-meatballs
2 Eggs – Beaten
1 cup Bread Crumbs
1 pkg. Lipton Onion Soup Mix
Preparation:

Preheat oven to 350°. Mix ingredients, roll into bite-size meatballs. Place in 9 x 12 inch pan, set aside.

Sauce

1 can Sauerkraut (large rinsed once) 1 jar Chili Sauce
1 can Whole Cranberries in Cranberry 1 cup Brown Sugar Sauce
In separate bowl mix ingredients. Pour over meatballs. Bake 1 1/2 hours stirring once after 1 hour and again when done. Serve warm with toothpicks.

 

http://www.sayersbrook.com/crazy-buffalo-meatballs/

Condiment of the Week – Sauerkraut

June 9, 2016 at 4:58 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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German sauerkraut

German sauerkraut

Sauerkraut (/ˈsaʊərkraʊt/; German pronunciation: [ˈzaʊ.ɐˌkʁaʊt] ( listen)) is finely cut cabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria, including Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Pediococcus. It has a long shelf life and a distinctive sour flavor, both of which result from the lactic acid that forms when the bacteria ferment the sugars in the cabbage.

 

 

 

 
Fermented foods have a long history in many cultures, with sauerkraut being one of the most well-known instances of traditional fermented moist cabbage side dishes. The Roman writers Cato (in his De Agri Cultura) and Columella (in his De re Rustica) mentioned preserving cabbages and turnips with salt.

Sauerkraut took root mostly in Eastern European and Germanic cuisines, but also in other countries including the

Homemade sauerkraut

Homemade sauerkraut

Netherlands, where it is known as zuurkool, and France, where the name became choucroute. The English name is borrowed from German where it means literally “sour herb” or “sour cabbage”. The names in Slavic and other East European languages are not cognate with German sauerkraut, but have similar meanings: “fermented cabbage” (Belarusian: квашаная капуста, Czech: kysané zelí, Polish: kiszona kapusta, Lithuanian: rauginti kopūstai, Russian: квашеная капуста, tr. kvashenaya kapusta, Ukrainian: квашена капуста) or “sour cabbage” (Bulgarian: кисело зеле, Czech: kyselé zelí, Hungarian: savanyúkáposzta, Russian: кислая капуста, tr. kislaya kapusta, Serbian: kiseli kupus, Slovak: kyslá kapusta, Ukrainian: кисла капуста, Romania: varză murată). In Poland name kwaszona kapusta (“soured cabbage”) is also used, but it indicates that cabbage might have been fermented in less traditional way.

Before frozen foods, refrigeration, and cheap transport from warmer areas became readily available in northern, central and eastern Europe, sauerkraut, like other preserved foods, provided a source of nutrients during the winter. James Cook always took a store of sauerkraut on his sea voyages, since experience had taught him it prevented scurvy.

During World War I, due to concerns the American public would reject a product with a German name, American sauerkraut makers relabeled their product as “Liberty cabbage” for the duration of the war.

During World War I, British and Commonwealth forces used the word Kraut, derived from the dish, as a derogatory term for the German people. During World War II, the term was picked up by American Forces.

 
In Belarusian, Russian and Ukrainian cuisine, chopped cabbage is usually pickled together with shredded carrots. Other ingredients may include whole or quartered apples for additional flavor or cranberry for flavor and better keeping (the benzoic acid in cranberries is a common preservative). Bell peppers also known to be added as they improve the looks of the completed dish. The resulting sauerkraut salad is typically served cold, as a zakuski or a side dish. There is also a home made type of very mild sauerkraut where white cabbage is pickled with salt in a refrigerator for only between three and seven days. This results in very little lactic acid being produced. Typically wider strips of 1 to 2 centimeters (1″) are used rather than the shredded cabbage used for traditional sauerkraut. This type is popular when eaten with zakuski.

Sauerkraut is used as a filling for Polish pierogi, Ukrainian varenyky, Russian pirogi and pirozhki. Sauerkraut is also

Eastern European style sauerkraut pickled with carrots and served as a salad

Eastern European style sauerkraut pickled with carrots and served as a salad

the most important ingredient in traditional soups, such as shchi (a national dish of Russia), kapusniak (Poland and Ukraine), kwaśnica (Poland), kapustnica (Slovakia), and zelňačka (Czech Republic). It is a common ingredient of Polish bigos (a hunter’s stew).

In Germany, cooked sauerkraut is often flavored with juniper berries or cumin seeds, apples and white wine are popular variations. Traditionally it is served warm, with pork (e.g. eisbein, schweinshaxe, Kassler) or sausages (smoked or fried sausages, Frankfurter Würstchen, Vienna sausages, black pudding), accompanied typically by roasted or steamed potatoes or dumplings (knödel or schupfnudel). Similar recipes are common in other Central European cuisines. The Czech national dish vepřo knedlo zelo consists of roast pork with knedliky and sauerkraut.

Sauerkraut is the main ingredient of the Alsatian meal choucroute garnie (French for “dressed sauerkraut”), sauerkraut with sausages (Strasbourg sausages, smoked Morteau or Montbéliard sausages), charcuterie (bacon, ham, etc.), and often potatoes. Usually it is cooked with Alsatian white wines.

Sauerkraut, along with pork, is eaten traditionally in Pennsylvania on New Years Day. The tradition, started by the Pennsylvania Dutch, is thought to bring good luck for the upcoming year. Sauerkraut is also used in American cuisine as a condiment upon various foods, such as sandwiches and hot dogs.

 
Many health benefits have been claimed for sauerkraut.

* It is a source of vitamins C, B, and K; the fermentation process increases the bioavailability of nutrients rendering sauerkraut even more nutritious than the original cabbage. It is also low in calories and high in calcium and magnesium, and it is a very good source of dietary fiber, folate, iron, potassium, copper and manganese.
* If unpasteurized and uncooked, sauerkraut also contains live lactobacilli and beneficial microbes and is rich in enzymes. The fiber and supply of probiotics improve digestion and promote the growth of healthy bowel flora, protecting against many diseases of the digestive tract.
* Sauerkraut has been used in Europe for centuries to treat stomach ulcers, and its effectiveness for soothing the digestive tract has been well established by numerous studies.
* Raw sauerkraut is distinctly different from store-bought, canned sauerkraut. While many food manufacturers can or jar their kraut using heat in order to extend shelf life, raw sauerkraut is lacto-fermented and is alive with good bacteria and probiotics. Raw sauerkraut is fermented over days or weeks at room temperature, packaged into jars with its own brine solution, then refrigerated to preserve the vitamins, enzymes, and beneficial bacteria without any heat. The lactic acid creates beneficial intestinal flora, balances stomach pH both directions, and helps break down proteins.

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Pastrami “Reuben” Sandwich

May 25, 2016 at 5:06 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is a Buffalo Pastrami “Reuben” Sandwich. Thus one is made with the delicious Wild Idea Buffalo Pastrami. Topped with Sauerkraut and Irish Cheddar Cheese. Then served on Pumpernickel Bread and a bowl of Potato Soup! You can find this recipe and purchase the Buffalo Pastrami all at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 
Buffalo Pastrami “Reuben” Sandwich

The O’Brien household’s version of this pub favorite. So good, it will become a weekly request!

Serves 4

Ingredients:Buffalo Pastrami Reuben Sandwich

1 package Buffalo Pastrami
1 ½ cup “Bubbies” Sauerkraut (it’s really, really good)
4 ounces Irish Cheddar Cheese
6 slices Pumpernickel Bread
1 tablespoon Butter
*Reuben Sauce
Preparation:
1 – On flat top griddle or in a large sauté pan over medium heat place Buffalo Pastrami in lightly oiled pan to heat through. Turn while heating.
2 – Arrange Buffalo Pastrami in 4 equal piles and top with cheese. Add sauerkraut to the pan too. Cover and heat until cheese is melted, and sauerkraut is warm.
3 – Remove from pan and cover to keep warm.
4 – Spread butter on one side of the bread and grill bread until golden brown.
5 – Stack meat, cheese and kraut on inside of grilled bread and spread the other slice with *Rueben sauce (recipe below), and sandwich together.
Serve with Potato, Leek Soup.

Ingredients:

*Rueben Sauce

1/2 cup MayonnaiseWild Idea
¼ cup Salsa
¼ cup Roasted and Peeled Red Peppers
Salt
Pepper
Preparation:
1 – Place all ingredients in food processor and puree.
2 – Season with slat & pepper to taste.

http://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes?page=8

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