One of America’s Favorites – Enchilada

November 28, 2016 at 6:50 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Enchiladas with mole sauce, served with refried beans and Spanish rice

Enchiladas with mole sauce, served with refried beans and Spanish rice

An enchilada (/ˌɛntʃᵻˈlɑːdə/, Spanish: [entʃiˈlaða]) is a corn tortilla rolled around a filling and covered with a chili pepper sauce. Enchiladas can be filled with a variety of ingredients, including meat, cheese, beans, potatoes, vegetables or combinations.

 

 

 

 
The Real Academia Española defines the word enchilada, as used in Mexico, as a rolled maize tortilla stuffed with meat and covered with a tomato and chili sauce. Enchilada is the past participle of Spanish enchilar, “to add chili pepper to”, literally to “season (or decorate) with chili”.

The idiomatic English phrase “the whole enchilada” means “the whole thing”.

 

 

enchiladas

enchiladas

Enchiladas originated in Mexico, where the practice of rolling tortillas around other food dates back at least to Mayan times. The people living in the lake region of the Valley of Mexico traditionally ate corn tortillas folded or rolled around small fish. Writing at the time of the Spanish conquistadors, Bernal Díaz del Castillo documented a feast enjoyed by Europeans hosted by Hernán Cortés in Coyoacán, which included foods served in corn tortillas. In the 19th century, as Mexican cuisine was being memorialized, enchiladas were mentioned in the first Mexican cookbook, El cocinero mexicano (“The Mexican Chef”), published in 1831, and in Mariano Galvan Rivera’s Diccionario de Cocina, published in 1845. An early mention, in English, is a 1914 recipe found in California Mexican-Spanish Cookbook, by Bertha Haffner Ginger.

 
In their original form as Mexican street food, enchiladas were simply corn tortillas dipped in chili sauce and eaten without fillings. There are now many varieties, which are distinguished primarily by their sauces, fillings and, in one instance, by their form. Various adjectives may be used to describe the recipe content or origin, e.g. enchilada tapatia would be a recipe from Jalisco.

Varieties include:

Enchiladas with red and green

Enchiladas with red and green

* Enchiladas con chile rojo (with red chile) is a traditional red enchilada sauce, composed of dried red chili peppers soaked and ground into a sauce with other seasonings, Chile Colorado sauce adds a tomato base.
* Enchiladas con mole, instead of chili sauce, are served with mole, and are also known as enmoladas.
* Enchiladas placera are Michoacán plaza-style, made with vegetables and poultry.
* Enchiladas poblanas are soft corn tortillas filled with chicken and poblano peppers, topped with oaxaca cheese.
* Enchiladas potosinas originate from San Luis Potosi, Mexico and are made with cheese-filled, chili-spiced masa.
* Enchiladas San Miguel are San Miguel de Allende-style enchiladas flavored with guajillo chilies by searing the flavor into the tortillas in a frying pan.
* Enchiladas suizas (Swiss-style) are topped with a white, milk or cream-based sauce, such as béchamel. This appellation is derived from Swiss immigrants to Mexico who established dairies to produce cream and cheese.
* Enfrijoladas are topped with refried beans rather than chili sauce; their name comes from frijol, meaning “bean”.
* Entomatadas are made with tomato sauce instead of chile sauce.
* Enchiladas montadas, stacked enchiladas, are a New Mexico variation in which corn tortillas are fried flat until softened but not tough, then stacked with red or green sauce, chopped onion and shredded cheese between the layers and on top of the stack. Ground beef or chicken can be added to the filling, but meat is not traditional. The stack is often topped (montada) with a fried egg. Shredded lettuce and sliced black olives may be added as a garnish.

 
Fillings include meat (e.g. beef, poultry, pork, seafood) or cheese, potatoes, vegetables, and any combination of these. Enchiladas are commonly topped or garnished with cheese, sour cream, lettuce, olives, chopped onions, chili peppers, salsa, or fresh cilantro.

 

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Healthy Recipes for Father’s Day

June 18, 2016 at 5:04 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website its Healthy Recipes for Father’s Day. Prepare a delicious and healthy Father’s Day Meal for Dad this weekend. A fantastic selection of recipes including; Grilled Beef Tenderloin & Escarole, Lemon & Oregano Lamb Chops, Beer-Barbecued Chicken. You can see them all at the EatingWell website, Enjoy! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 

Healthy Recipes for Father’s Day

Delicious dinners to celebrate Dad on Father’s Day.EatingWell2
Fire up the grill, pull out the lawn chairs and celebrate Father’s Day with these healthy dinner recipes. We’ve lightened up Dad’s favorites, like grilled beef tenderloin, lamb chops, fish tacos, beer-barbecued chicken and more Father’s Day recipes. Show your dad just how much you care by cooking him a delicious and healthy dinner this Father’s Day.

 
Grilled Beef Tenderloin & Escarole
Lightly grilled escarole combined with tangy tomato vinaigrette makes an irresistible accompaniment to juicy beef tenderloin. Serve with grilled baguette…..

 
Lemon & Oregano Lamb Chops
Juicy lamb chops take a trip to the Middle East with a quick herb-and-lemon rub and a tangy cucumber-tahini sauce. Serve with couscous or rice pilaf and a green salad….

 
Beer-Barbecued Chicken
Here’s our spin on the roast-a-chicken-on-top-of-a-can-of-beer technique that’s popular with barbecue aficionados. To simplify things, we just pour a little beer inside the chicken as it cooks. The beer keeps the meat juicy and a smoky-flavored spice rub both under and over the skin gives it extra flavor. Barbecuing poultry with the skin on helps prevent the meat from drying out. To keep calories and fat in check, remove the skin before serving……

 
* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Recipes for Father’s Day
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_recipes_for_father_s_day

Condiment of the Week – Remoulade

May 5, 2016 at 4:56 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | 2 Comments
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A half-spoon of French remoulade

A half-spoon of French remoulade

Rémoulade (English pronunciation: /reɪməˈlɑːd/; French: [ʁemulad]) is a condiment invented in France that is usually aioli- or mayonnaise-based. Although similar to tartar sauce, it is often more yellowish (or reddish in Louisiana), sometimes flavored with curry, and sometimes contains chopped pickles or piccalilli. It can also contain horseradish, paprika, anchovies, capers and a host of other items. While its original purpose was possibly for serving with meats, it is now more often used as an accompaniment to seafood dishes, especially pan-fried breaded fish fillets (primarily sole and plaice) and seafood cakes (such as crab or salmon cakes).

 
Remoulade is used in France, Denmark, Iceland, Faroe Islands, Germany, Poland, Sweden, Netherlands, Norway and in the United States, especially in Louisiana Creole cuisine. It is used with french fries, on top of roast beef items, and as a hot dog condiment, although there are a multitude of other applications:

* France: rémoulade is made from mayonnaise to which is added vinegar, mustard, shallots, capers, chopped pickles, and/or fresh herbs (chives, tarragon, chervil, burnet). It is commonly used in céleri rémoulade, which consists of thinly cut pieces of celeriac with a mustard-flavored remoulade and also to accompany red meats, fish and shellfish.
* Belgium: One of the condiments for frites, often sold at takeaway stands.
* Netherlands: Often served with fried fish.
* Germany: Mainly used with fried fish, and as an ingredient of potato salads. When marketed as “Danish remoulade”, it is used for the “Danish hot dog”, fish with boiled potatoes, dill and creamed spinach.
* Sweden: Remouladsås – the French version – is a common accessory to fried or breaded fish dishes, and used as topping on roast beef. The Danish version is also available, and is used on a variety of dishes referred to as ‘Danish-style’, for example Danish hot-dogs, Danish smørrebrød and suchlike.
* Denmark: An essential ingredient on open-face roast beef sandwiches (smørrebrød), along with Fried onion. Remoulade is also used for fish meatballs or breaded fillets of fish (e.g. cod or plaice) along with lemon slices. For french fries, the Danes can usually order tomato ketchup, remoulade or both, although in recent years mayonnaise has gained ground. In most regions it is used on hot dogs along with hot or sweet mustard, ketchup, fried or raw onions and pickled cucumber slices.
* Norway: Primarily served with deep fried fish.
* Iceland: remúlaði is a condiment commonly served on hot dogs, together with mustard, ketchup, and raw and fried onions.
* USA: Typically served as a condiment with seafoods and certain vegetables. Fried soft-shell crab sandwiches may be served with remoulade as the only sauce.
* Louisiana Creole cuisine: Remoulade often contains paprika and tends to be have a tannish or pink tint due to the use of Creole brown mustard like Zatarain’s, small amounts of ketchup, cayenne pepper, and paprika.

 
Varieties
Sauce rémoulade
According to Larousse Gastronomique, rémoulade is 1 cup of mayonnaise with 2 tablespoons mixed herbs (parsley, chives, chervil and tarragon), 1 tablespoon drained capers, 2 finely diced cornichons and a few drops of anchovy essence (optional). Some recipes use chopped anchovy fillets. The rémoulade used in céleri rémoulade is a simple mustard-flavored mayonnaise spiced with garlic and pepper. Rémoulade is classified in French cooking as a derivative of the mayonnaise sauce.

Danish remoulade
Danish remoulade has a mild, sweet-sour taste and a medium yellow color. The typical industrially-made variety does not contain capers, but finely-chopped cabbage and pickled cucumber, fair amounts of sugar and hints of mustard, cayenne pepper, coriander and onion, and turmeric for color. The herbs are replaced by herbal essences, e.g. tarragon vinegar. Starch, gelatin or milk protein may be added as thickeners.

Homemade or gourmet varieties may use olive oil (especially good with fish), capers, pickles, carrots, cucumber, lemon juice, dill, chervil, parsley or other fresh herbs, and possibly curry.

Louisiana remoulade

Louisiana remoulade can vary from the elegant French-African Creole, the rustic Afro-Caribbean Creole, or the Classic Cajun version, and like the local variants of roux, each version is different from the French original. Creole versions often have tan or pink hues and are usually piquant. Louisiana-style remoulades fall generally into one of two categories—those with a mayonnaise base and those with an oil base, but sometimes both mayonnaise and oil are used. Each version may have finely chopped vegetables, usually green onions and celery, and parsley; most are made with either Creole or stone-ground mustard. Salt, black pepper, and cayenne pepper are also standard ingredients. In the oil- and mayonnaise-based versions, the reddish hue often comes from the addition of a small amount of ketchup. The sauce is often topped with paprika for the aesthetics as well as the flavor. Generally, acidity is added with the inclusion of lemon juice or vinegar. Other additions include hardboiled egg or raw egg yolks, minced garlic, hot sauce, vinegar, horseradish, capers, cornichons, and Worcestershire sauce.

While the classic white remoulade is a condiment that can be offered in a variety of contexts (e.g. the classic celery

Louisiana-style remoulade sauce

Louisiana-style remoulade sauce

root remoulade), Creole remoulade is used on shrimp, crabs, fried calamari, artichokes, and fried green tomatoes among other foods. Today, shrimp remoulade is a very common cold appetizer in New Orleans Creole restaurants, although, historically, hard boiled eggs with remoulade was a less expensive option on some menus. Shrimp remoulade is most often served as a stand-alone appetizer (usually on a chiffonade of iceberg lettuce). One might also see crawfish remoulade, but remoulade sauce is very seldom offered in restaurants as an accompaniment with fish; cocktail sauce and tartar sauce are generally the condiments of choice. Food columnist and cookbook author Leon Soniat suggests to “Serve [remoulade] over seafood or with sliced asparagus.”

Central Mississippi has Comeback sauce, a condiment that is very similar to Louisiana remoulade.

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Grilled Steak Tournedos with Sauce Bearnaise

February 24, 2016 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is a Grilled Steak Tournedos with Sauce Béarnaise. To prepare this one you’ll be using Wild Idea Buffalo Tenderloin or Top Sirloin Steak. Nothing is anymore delicious than the Wild Idea Buffalo Steaks. Tender, moist, and so flavorful, they are incredible! Another winning recipe from Wild Idea Buffalo! You can find this recipe and even purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Tenderloin or Top Sirloin Steak all on the Wild Idea Buffalo website. http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

 

Grilled Steak Tournedos with Sauce Bearnaise
This classic, timeless favorite is simple to prepare, delicious and elegant. A great entree to serve for a dinner party or for a romantic dinner for two!

Entree Ingredients: per serving
1 – 5 or 8 ounce Filet Mignon Steak or Top Sirloin SteakGrilled Steak Tournedos with Sauce Béarnaise
2 – tablespoon olive oil
2 – teaspoons salt
1 – teaspoon black pepper
1 – organic potato, baked or boiled
3 – spears asparagus
1 – lemon, quartered
Béarnaise Sauce recipe listed below

Preparation:

1 – Steak: Rinse steak under cold water and pat dry with paper towels. Pour 1 tablespoon of olive oil on a plate and add ¼ teaspoon salt & pepper each. Mix together and roll the steak into the seasoned olive oil. Cover and let rest for 2 hours before grilling. Preheat grill to high heat, 500°. Place prepared steaks on clean oiled grill grate over high heat. Grill steaks for 3 minutes on each side, with grill lid closed during cooking, for medium rare results. Remove from heat, season with a little more salt, cover and rest for 5 minutes.
2 – Potato: Bake or boil your potato and allow it to come to room temperature. Slice the potato into ½ inch circles. Over lap the potato slices into a tight pinwheel. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a sauté pan over medium high heat. Using a spatula, add the potato pinwheel to the pan and season with a little salt & pepper. Cook the potato pinwheel for about 5 minutes or until golden brown. Again, using a spatula, turn the potato pinwheel and cook for an additional 5 minutes or until lightly browned.
3 – Asparagus: Wash asparagus, and trim the thicker ends off. Using a potato peeler, peel one of the stalks into asparagus ribbons. Over high heat, bring one cup of water, plus a squeeze of fresh lemon juice and a teaspoon of salt to a boil. Add the asparagus spears and cook for 3 minutes, adding the asparagus ribbons during the last minute. Remove from water and place on a plate lined with a paper towel.
4 – To plate, place crispy potato pinwheel in the center of the plate, top with grilled steak, asparagus spears and ribbons, and drizzle with desired amount of sauce Béarnaise.
Béarnaise Sauce

Ingredients;
3 – egg yolks
1½ – tablespoons lemon juice
1 – tablespoon tarragon leaves
1 – teaspoon black pepper
¼ – teaspoon cayenne pepper, more if desired
1 – stick salted organic butter, melted and still hot
1½ – tablespoon white wine vinegar

Preparation:Wild Idea

1 – Place egg yolks, lemon juice, tarragon, pepper, and cayenne in a blender and blend until slightly thick.
2 – Add the melted, hot butter through the top, smaller opening of the blender while the blender is still running. Blend to incorporate. Sauce should be fairly thick.
3 – When ready to serve, flash blend again, adding the vinegar at the end. Season to taste.

http://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/87651905-grilled-steak-tournedos-with-sauce-bearnaise

Condiment of the Week – Horseradish Sauce

February 11, 2016 at 6:20 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | 2 Comments
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A bottle of Heinz horseradish sauce

A bottle of Heinz horseradish sauce

Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana, syn. Cochlearia armoracia) is a perennial plant of the Brassicaceae family (which also includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage). It is a root vegetable used as a spice.

The plant is probably native to southeastern Europe and western Asia. It is now popular around the world. It grows up to 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) tall, and is cultivated primarily for its large, white, tapered root.

The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. When cut or grated, however, enzymes from the now-broken plant cells break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the mucous membranes of the sinuses and eyes. Grated mash should be used immediately or preserved in vinegar for best flavor. Once exposed to air or heat it will begin to lose its pungency, darken in color, and become unpleasantly bitter tasting over time.

 

 

Helluva Good Bacon Horseradish
Horseradish sauce made from grated horseradish root and vinegar is a popular condiment in the United Kingdom and in Poland. In the UK it is usually served with roast beef, often as part of a traditional Sunday roast, but can be used in a number of other dishes also, including sandwiches or salads. A variation of horseradish sauce, which in some cases may substitute the vinegar with other products like lemon juice or citric acid, is known in Germany as Tafelmeerrettich. Also popular in the UK is Tewkesbury mustard, a blend of mustard and grated horseradish originating in medieval times and mentioned by Shakespeare (Falstaff says: “his wit’s as thick as Tewkesbury Mustard” in Henry IV Part II. A very similar mustard, called Krensenf or Meerrettichsenf, is popular in Austria and parts of Eastern Germany. In France, sauce au raifort is popular in Alsatian cuisine.

In the U.S., the term “horseradish sauce” refers to grated horseradish combined with mayonnaise or salad dressing. Prepared horseradish is a common ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails and in cocktail sauce, and is used as a sauce or sandwich spread. Horseradish cream is a mixture of horseradish and sour cream and is served alongside au jus for a prime rib dinner.

Condiment of the Week – Chimichurri

December 31, 2015 at 5:55 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | Leave a comment
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Chimichurri

Chimichurri

Chimichurri (Spanish pronunciation: [tʃimiˈtʃuri]) or chimmichurri is a green sauce used for grilled meat, originally from the Rio de la Plata, Argentina. It is made of finely chopped parsley, minced garlic, olive oil, oregano, and white vinegar. In Uruguay, the dominant flavoring is parsley, garlic, red pepper flakes, and fresh oregano.

 
The origin of the name of the sauce is unclear. There are various stories explaining the name as a corruption of English words, most commonly the name ‘Jimmy Curry’ or ‘Jimmy McCurry’. But there is no contemporary documentation of any of these stories.

 

Another theory for the name of the sauce comes from the Basque settlers that arrived in Argentina as early as the 19th century. According to this theory, the name of the sauce comes from the Basque term tximitxurri, loosely translated as “a mixture of several things in no particular order”.

 
Chimichurri is made from finely chopped parsley, minced garlic, olive oil, oregano, Red Chili Flakes, and white or red wine vinegar. Additional flavorings such as paprika, cumin, thyme, lemon, basil, cilantro (coriander leaf) and bay leaf may be included. In its red version, tomato and red bell pepper may also be added. It can also be used as a marinade for grilled meat. Chimichurri is available bottled or dehydrated for preparation by mixing with oil and water. Variants may replace the parsley with herbs such as coriander (cilantro) and culantro.

 

Christmas Dishes – Cranberry Sauce

December 17, 2015 at 5:57 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Cranberry sauce

Cranberry sauce or cranberry jelly is a sauce or relish made out of cranberries, commonly associated with Thanksgiving dinner in North America and Christmas dinner in the United Kingdom. There are differences in flavor depending on the geography of where the sauce is made: in Europe it is generally slightly sour-tasting, while in North America it is sweetened.

 
Cranberry sauce was first offered to consumers in North America in 1912. Canned cranberry sauce appeared on the market in 1941, allowing the product to be sold year-round.

 
The most basic cranberry sauce consists of cranberries boiled in sugar water until the berries pop and the mixture thickens. Some recipes include other ingredients such as slivered almonds, orange juice, zest, ginger, maple syrup, port, or cinnamon.

Commercial cranberry sauce may be loose and uncondensed, or condensed or jellied and sweetened with various ingredients. The jellied form may be slipped out of a can onto a dish, and served sliced or intact for slicing at the table.

Cranberry sauce is often eaten in conjunction with turkey for Christmas in the United Kingdom or Thanksgiving in the United States and Canada, and it is only rarely eaten or served in other contexts there.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 23, 2015 at 5:34 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Audrey for passing this hint along, she said she learned this one from experience!

 

Never heat pesto sauce the basil will turn black and taste bitter.

Low-Calorie Holiday Dinner Recipes That Won’t Pack Pounds

December 23, 2014 at 6:22 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Here’s a little help to have a delicious Holiday Dinner and still stay on your diet. From the EatingWell website, Low-Calorie Holiday Dinner Recipes That Won’t Pack Pounds.

 
Low-Calorie Holiday Dinner Recipes That Won’t Pack Pounds

 

 

EatingWell2
Low-calorie dinner recipes for a delicious, festive holiday.
For a delicious, healthy dinner this holiday season, make a lighter entree to serve your friends and family. Our low-calorie holiday dinners are healthy main-course recipes that will please all the guests at your dinner table. Try Braised Lamb Shanks & Eggplant for a flavor-packed, slow-cooked meal or Roast Chicken with Pomegranate Glaze for a festive, low-calorie chicken dish. Enjoy your holiday meal with our low-calorie dinner recipes.

 

 
Braised Lamb Shanks & Eggplant
This slow-cooked lamb and eggplant stew melts in your mouth. Sumac, a lemony-flavored spice, gives the dish a fruity, tangy aroma. Look for it in Mediterranean markets or spice shops. Serve the stew over mashed root vegetables, bulgur or brown rice…..

 

 

Roast Chicken with Pomegranate Glaze
This sweet-tart pomegranate molasses glaze is delicious combined with the citrusy sumac spice rub, and gives the roasted chicken a dark, ruby luster. Rub the chicken earlier in the day, or overnight, for the best flavor…..

 
* Click the link below to have all the Low-Calorie Holiday Dinner Recipes That Won’t Pack Pounds

 

 

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/low_calorie_holiday_dinner_recipes_that_won_t_pack_pounds?sssdmh=dm17.774187&utm_source=EWDNL&esrc=nwewd121514

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Bolognese Sauce

August 13, 2014 at 5:27 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Everything is better when you use Buffalo, including Bolognese Sauce. It’s this week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Bolognese Sauce. Another great one from Jill O’Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo.

 

 

 

Buffalo Bolognese SauceWild Idea Buffalo Bolognese Sauce
By: Jill O’Brien

 
Our clean, earthy and slightly sweet Italian Buffalo Sausage gives this red sauce an extra richness without the heaviness. Sure to be a hit with the family or great for casual entertaining.

 

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS:

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 – Pound Italian Buffalo Sausage
* 1 – onion, diced
* 1 tablespoon fresh garlic, chopped
* 1 tablespoon dried oregano
* 1 tablespoon dried basil
* 2 teaspoon dried, crushed fennel
* ½ teaspoon fresh rosemary, finely diced
* 1 teaspoon salt
* 1 teaspoon black pepper
* 1/2 – cup red wine
* 1 quart crushed tomatoes, (rinse jar with 1 cup water)
* 1 tablespoon brown sugar
* ½ tablespoon balsamic vinegar
* 1 tablespoon lemon juice
* Spaghetti, prepared el dente
PREPARATION:

1.) Heat olive oil in heavy sauce pan over medium high heat.
2.) Coarsely crumble in Buffalo Italian Sausage and stir once.
3.) Add onion, garlic and dried spices. Stir to incorporate. Continue to cook until sausage is lightly browned, stirring occasionally.
4.) Add red wine and stir.
5.) Add remaining ingredients. Let ingredients come to full heat, stirring occasionally.
6.) Reduce heat to low and simmer uncovered for ½ hour or until desired thickness is achieved. Stir occasionally.
7.) Season to taste.

 

Serve over pasta, and sprinkle with freshly grated parmesan and garnish with fresh basil leaf. Accompany with warm Italian Bread and Caesar Salad for a complete meal.

 
http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/buffalo-spaghetti-meat-sauce/

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