Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 26, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Bring on the Seasoning…………

Ground Beef alone makes a pretty dull-tasting Hamburger, so make sure the Meat is mixed throughout with at least Salt and Pepper. Other ingredients, like Worcestershire Sauce, Hot Sauce, Grated Onions, or Lipton Onion Soup Mix will improve not only the taste but also the juiciness of your Hamburgers.

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Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 23, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Reducing Salt (Sodium)……….

 

A couple of hints on lowering the amount of Salt in our cooking. Prepare foods at home so you can control the amount of salt in your meals. Also use as little salt in cooking as possible. You can cut at least half the salt from most recipes.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 16, 2019 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Easy on the salt………

Vegetables naturally high in sodium include beets, kale, chard, celery, spinach, dandelion greens, carrots, endive, corn, and artichokes. Take care when adding salt.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 29, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Put back the Salt Shaker and………

When a savory dish needs a little kick, try a squeeze of lemon instead of salt. A hit of citrus can make the whole recipe come to life.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 20, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Did you add too much salt………..

If you add too much salt to a soup or stew throw in a raw peeled potato or apple and it will help absorb the excess salt. Remove it after 10 minutes or so.

Bison Filet Mignon w/ Oven Roasted Cauliflower and Roasted Butternut Squash

January 17, 2019 at 6:33 PM | Posted in bison, Buffalo Gal | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Bison Filet Mignon w/ Oven Roasted Cauliflower and Roasted Butternut Squash

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I Scrambled a couple of Eggs and toasted a couple of slices of Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. Also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. We had a mix of snow, sleet, and rain today. Had a high of 37 degrees. Bitter cold weather moving in over the weekend they say. After Breakfast I did a load of laundry and later cleaned and straightened the Pantry. I hired a an Awning and Roof Company to put braces underneath the top of the Car Port Awning. There’s been 4 houses where the Car Ports have crumbled because of the heavy wet snows. Plus it’s very old so hopefully this will prevent it from collapsing. For Dinner tonight its a Bison Filet Mignon w/ Oven Roasted Cauliflower and Roasted Butternut Squash.

 

 

 


When having Buffalo (Bison) I usually have Wild Idea Buffalo but tonight I tried the Buffalo Gal Bison Filet Mignon Steak. I had a Gift Certificate for Buffalo Gal so I thought I would give it a try. I prepared it the same way as I do the Wild Idea Buffalo. Salt, Pepper, Extra Light Olive Oil, and in a Cast Iron Skillet.

 

 

 

 

 


To prepare it I preheated the oven to 400°. In a Cast Iron Skillet that I sprayed with Pam Cooking Spray and added a tablespoon of Extra Light Olive Oil to, I heated it over medium high heat. When ready I added my Steaks to it. I cooked the Steaks 1 minute each side. I just wanted a light sear on both sides. Then I moved the Skillet on to the preheated Oven and Roasted it for about 4 minutes. Removed the Skillet from the Oven and placed the Steaks on a plate and let them rest for 5 minutes before cutting. Wow, what a juicy and tender Bison Steak! Excellent flavor, I will be having these again!

 

 

 

 

I had purchased a package of Cauliflower from Kroger the other day. We love Cauliflower, I just don’t prepare it near enough. To prepare it I’ll need; McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Peppercorn Medley, and Butter. Then to prepare it Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Spread the cauliflower on a baking sheet and season with salt and pepper. Roast in the oven, turning once with a spatula, until golden brown at the edges and cooked to desired tenderness, about 20 minutes or so. You can drizzle it with melted butter or a light coating of Wing Sauce before serving. Cauliflower is so delicious, even an easy recipe like this!

 


Then for one side I prepared some Roasted Butternut Squash, easy recipe for some delicious Butternut Squash! I purchased 1 small package of Diced Butternut Squash at Kroger. They sell packages of it that they dice up. This is a lot easier than peeling and seeding one yourself, especially if you don’t have a good knife to cut it. I’ll need; 1 package of Diced Butternut Squash, Walnut Pieces, Bacon Pieces, 1 tablespoons Extra Light Olive Oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons McCormick Grinder Sea Salt, and 1 teaspoon McCormick Grinder Peppercorn Medley.

 

 

 

 


To prepare it; Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Place the Squash on a sheet pan and drizzle with the Olive Oil, Salt, and Peppercorn and toss well. Arrange the squash in one layer and roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until the Squash is tender, turning once with a spatula. And done, very easy to prepare. With the small amount of Seasoning and Olive Oil, it really brings out the flavor of Butternut Squash! The Walnuts work perfect with the Squash. What a Meal! For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buffalo Gal Bison Filet Mignon Steaks
Our premium cut. . .so tender you can cut ’em with a fork. Receive 2 (7-9 oz.) steaks. (2 steaks per package, package is over 1 lb.)
Nutrition (6 oz.):
234 calories; 3.2 g fat; 105 mg cholesterol; 91.8 mg sodium

http://www.buffalogal.com/Bison-Filet-Mignon-Steaks-P37.aspx

http://www.buffalogal.com/Default.aspx

 

 

Butternut Squash Health Benefits………
Low in fat, butternut squash delivers an ample dose of dietary fiber, making it an exceptionally heart-friendly choice. It provides significant amounts of potassium, important for bone health, and vitamin B6, essential for the proper functioning of both the nervous and immune systems.

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week -BUFFALO PRIME RIB ROAST

December 5, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is -BUFFALO PRIME RIB ROAST. Ti’s the season for Prime Rib! You’ll be using the Wild Idea Buffalo Prime Rib Roast. Salt, black pepper, paprika, cumin, cardamom, chili powder, thyme, garlic powder, onion powder, and espresso to strengthen flavor make up this incredible rub for the Roast. You can find this recipe or purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Prime Rib Roast along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy through the Holiday Season! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

BUFFALO PRIME RIB ROAST
Note: This recipe is based on an 8 lb. roast, adjust cooking time to pounds. Spices in the rub can be substituted or adjusted to your liking. This rub is excellent on all roasts. Modify spices per pounds.

Ingredients:

1 Buffalo Prime Rib Roast, rinsed and patted dry
1 Tb. salt
1 Tb. coarse black pepper
2 Tb. sugar
1 tsp. each: paprika, cumin, cardamom, chili powder, thyme,
garlic powder, and onion powder
2 Tb. espresso, (reduce espresso to strengthen flavor)
2 Tb. olive oil
2 stalks celery, quartered
1 onion, quartered
2 cups buffalo or organic beef stock (broth)
½ cup dry sherry

1 – Mix all dry spices together. Add espresso and oil, creating a paste.
2 – Rub seasoning paste into roast. Cover and leave at room temperature for 2 hours.
3 – Preheat oven to 450* Insert meat thermometer in center of roast, avoiding the bone.
4 – Place celery & onion on bottom of heavy roasting pan. Place roast bone side up on top of vegetable bed.
5 – Roast for 15 minutes.
6 – Add ½ cup stock to the bottom of pan and reduce oven temperature to 350°.
7 – Continue roasting, calculating 10 minutes per pound, adding remaining stock to pan as needed throughout roasting. (Approximately 1 hour and 20 minutes for an 8 lb. roast or until the internal meat thermometer reaches 110*. Rely on your internal meat thermometer.)
8 – Shut oven off and leave roast in oven for 30 minutes or until internal meat thermometer reaches 125*.
9 – Transfer meat to a large platter and tent with foil to keep heat in. Meat thermometer should red 135* for medium rare.
10 – Place roasting pan on stove top over medium high heat, scraping the bottom to
11 – Loosen vegetables. Add any remaining stock and sherry and bring to a simmer.
12 – Slice roast into desired thickness, and add juices from roast to au jus.
13 – Season au jus to taste with salt, pepper and red wine. Strain.
14 – Serve roast with au jus and pass with horseradish cream sauce.
Or, you might also want to try the Cranberry Port Sauce for the holidays?

Cranberry Port Sauce

Ingredients:

1 Tb. butter
½ cup red onion, finely diced
1 Tb. garlic, minced
1 tsp. thyme
½ tsp. salt
1 Tb. black pepper
1 cup port +
1 can cranberry sauce
1 – In saucepan over medium high heat melt butter.
2 – Add onion, garlic and seasonings. Sauté for 7 minutes.
3 – Deglaze pan with port.
4 – Add cranberry sauce and stir in to incorporate.
Bring to simmer. Taste to adjust seasonings. If sauce becomes too thick, add additional port as needed. Drizzle over sliced Buffalo Roast.

*As another option, you can add 2 Tb. roasted and diced greens chilies.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/buffalo-prime-rib-roast

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 27, 2018 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Cutting back on Salt……

Instead of Salt try seasoning foods with herbs, spices, garlic, onions, peppers and lemon or lime juice to add flavor

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 14, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Reducing salt (sodium) in your diet……..

Prepare foods at home so you can control the amount of salt in your meals and use as little salt in cooking as possible. You can cut at least half the salt from most recipes. Give it a try!

Lunch Meat of the Week – Corned Beef

October 11, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Corned beef

Corned beef is a salt-cured beef product. The term comes from the treatment of the meat with large grained rock salt, also called “corns” of salt. It is featured as an ingredient in many cuisines.

Most recipes include nitrates or nitrites, which convert the natural myoglobin in beef to nitrosomyoglobin, giving a pink color. Nitrates and nitrites reduce the risk of dangerous botulism during curing by inhibiting the growth of Clostridium botulinum spores, but have been shown to be linked to increased cancer risk. Beef cured with salt only has a gray color and is sometimes called “New England corned beef.” Sometimes, sugar and spices are also added to corned beef recipes.

It was popular during World War I and World War II, when fresh meat was rationed. It also remains especially popular in Canada in a variety of dishes.

A corned beef on rye bread sandwich

Although the exact beginnings of corned beef are unknown, it most likely came about when people began preserving meat through salt-curing. Evidence of its legacy is apparent in numerous cultures, including ancient Europe and the Middle East. The word corn derives from Old English and is used to describe any small, hard particles or grains. In the case of corned beef, the word may refer to the coarse, granular salts used to cure the beef. The word “corned” may also refer to the corns of potassium nitrate, also known as saltpeter, which were formerly used to preserve the meat.

Corned beef on a bagel with mustard

In North America, corned beef dishes are associated with traditional Irish cuisine. However, considerable debate remains about the association of corned beef with Ireland. Mark Kurlansky, in his book Salt, states that the Irish produced a salted beef around the Middle Ages that was the “forerunner of what today is known as Irish corned beef” and in the 17th century, the English named the Irish salted beef “corned beef”.

Some say until the wave of 18th-century Irish immigration to the United States, many of the ethnic Irish had not begun to consume corned beef dishes as seen today. The popularity of corned beef compared to bacon among the immigrant Irish may have been due to corned beef being considered a luxury product in their native land, while it was cheaply and readily available in America.

The Jewish population produced similar salt-cured meat from beef brisket, which Irish immigrants purchased as corned beef from Jewish butchers. This may have been facilitated by the close cultural interactions and collaboration of these two diverse cultures in the United States’ main 19th- and 20th-century immigrant port of entry, New York City.

Corned beef hash out of the can

Canned corned beef has long been one of the standard meals included in military field ration packs around the world, due to its simplicity and instant preparation in such rations. One example is the American Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE) pack. Astronaut John Young sneaked a contraband corned beef sandwich on board Gemini 3, hiding it in a pocket of his spacesuit.

 

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