Kitchen Hint of the Week!

November 28, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Reduce salt in your diet………………..

Prepare more foods from fresh ingredients to lower sodium intake. Most sodium in the food supply comes from packaged or processed foods.

One of America’s Favorites – Ham

November 18, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Ham, One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Half ham

Ham is pork from a leg cut that has been preserved by wet or dry curing, with or without smoking. As a processed meat, the term “ham” includes both whole cuts of meat and ones that have been mechanically formed.

Ham is made around the world, including a number of regional specialties, such as Westphalian ham and some varieties of Spanish jamón. In addition, numerous ham products have specific geographical naming protection, such as prosciutto di Parma in Europe, and Smithfield ham in the US.

The preserving of pork leg as ham has a long history, with Cato the Elder writing about the “salting of hams” in his De Agri Cultura tome around 160 BC.

There are claims that the Chinese were the first people to mention the production of cured ham. Larousse Gastronomique claims an origin from Gaul. It was certainly well established by the Roman period, as evidenced by an import trade from Gaul mentioned by Marcus Terentius Varro in his writings.

Typical slice of ham

The modern word “ham” is derived from the Old English ham or hom meaning the hollow or bend of the knee, from a Germanic base where it meant “crooked”. It began to refer to the cut of pork derived from the hind leg of a pig around the 15th century.

Because of the preservation process, ham is a compound foodstuff or ingredient, being made up of the original meat, as well as the remnants of the preserving agent(s), such as salt, but it is still recognised as a food in its own right.

 

Methods
Ham is produced by curing raw pork by salting, also known as dry curing, or brining, also known as wet curing. Additionally, smoking may be employed.

Besides salt, several ingredients may be used to obtain flavoring and preservation, from black pepper (e.g. Prosciutto Toscano) to saffron (e.g. the “Zafferano di San Gimignano.

Dry-cured

Sea salt being added to raw pork leg as part of a dry cure process

Traditional dry cure hams may use only salt as the curative agent, such as with San Daniele or Parma hams, although this is comparatively rare. This process involves cleaning the raw meat, covering it in salt while it is gradually pressed draining all the blood. Specific herbs and spices may be used to add flavour during this step. The hams are then washed and hung in a dark, temperature-regulated place until dry. It is then hung to air for another period of time.

The duration of the curing process varies by the type of ham, with, for example, Serrano ham curing in 9–12 months, Parma hams taking more than 12 months, and Iberian ham taking up to 2 years to reach the desired flavour characteristics. Some dry cured hams, such as the Jinhua ham, take approximately 8 to 10 months to complete.

Most modern dry cure hams also use nitrites (either sodium nitrite or potassium nitrate), which are added along with the salt. Nitrates are used because they prevent bacterial growth and, in a reaction with the meat’s myoglobin, give the product a desirable dark red color. The amount and mixture of salt and nitrites used have an effect on the shrinkage of the meat. Because of the toxicity of nitrite (the lethal dose of nitrite for humans is about 22 mg per kg body weight), some areas specify a maximum allowable content of nitrite in the final product. Under certain conditions, especially during cooking, nitrites in meat can react with degradation products of amino acids, forming nitrosamines, which are known carcinogens.

The dry curing of ham involves a number of enzymatic reactions. The enzymes involved are proteinases (cathepsins – B, D, H & L, and calpains) and exopeptidases (peptidase and aminopeptidase). These enzymes cause proteolysis of muscle tissue, which creates large numbers of small peptides and free amino acids, while the adipose tissue undergoes lipolysis to create free fatty acids. Salt and phosphates act as strong inhibitors of proteolytic activity. Animal factors influencing enzymatic activity include age, weight, and breed. During the process itself, conditions such as temperature, duration, water content, redox potential, and salt content all have an effect.

The salt content in dry-cured ham varies throughout a piece of meat, with gradients determinable through sampling and testing or non-invasively through CT scanning.

Wet-cured
Wet-cured hams are brined, which involves the immersion of the meat in a brine, sometimes with other ingredients such as sugar also added for flavour. Meat is typically kept in the brine for around 3 to 14 days. Wet curing also has the effect of increasing volume and weight of the finished product, by about 4%.

The wet curing process can also be achieved by pumping the curing solution into the meat. This can be quicker, increase the weight of the finished product by more than immersion, and ensure a more even distribution of salt through the meat. This process is quicker than traditional brining, normally being completed in a few days.

Smoking
Ham can also be additionally preserved through smoking, in which the meat is placed in a smokehouse (or equivalent) to be cured by the action of smoke.

The main flavor compounds of smoked ham are guaiacol, and its 4-, 5-, and 6-methyl derivatives as well as 2,6-dimethylphenol. These compounds are produced by combustion of lignin, a major constituent of wood used in the smokehouse.

Labeling

A platter of ham and cheese sliced for sandwiches

In many countries the term is now protected by statute, with a specific definition. For instance, in the United States, the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) says that “the word ‘ham’, without any prefix indicating the species of animal from which derived, shall be used in labeling only in connection with the hind legs of swine”.

In addition to the main categories, some processing choices can affect legal labeling. For instance, in the United States, a “smoked” ham must have been smoked by hanging over burning wood chips in a smokehouse or an atomized spray of liquid smoke such that the product appearance is equivalent; a “hickory-smoked” ham must have been smoked using only hickory. However, injecting “smoke flavor” is not legal grounds for claiming the ham was “smoked”; these are labeled “smoke flavor added”. Hams can only be labeled “honey-cured” if honey was at least 50% of the sweetener used, is at least 3% of the formula, and has a discernible effect on flavor. So-called “lean” and “extra lean” hams must adhere to maximum levels of fat and cholesterol per 100 grams of product.

Whole fresh pork leg can be labeled as fresh ham in the United States.

Protected designations
A number of hams worldwide have some level of protection of their unique characteristics, usually relating to their method of preservation or location of production or processing. Dependent on jurisdiction, rules may prevent any other product being sold with the particular appellation, such as through the European protected geographical indication.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day

October 2, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Salt the water………….

While salting your pasta water it probably won’t do much to shorten your cooking time, it will make your noodles a lot more enjoyable. Unsalted pasta is wildly bland, but just a hint of salt in the water can change that.

Diabetic Dish of the Week – Simple Grilled Salmon for Diabetics

September 3, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is a Simple Grilled Salmon for Diabetics. Salmon Fillets seasoned with Olive Oil, Salt, and Lemon Pepper. That’s it, it’s ready for the grill! The Dish is only 141 calories and 1 carb! The recipe is from one of my favorite sites, the Diabetes Self Management website. At the Diabetes Self Management website you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes. So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Simple Grilled Salmon for Diabetics
Easy enough for even the most inexperienced chef, this delicious seafood dish is perfect for your Labor Day barbecue! And with only about 15 minutes of preparation required, you can spend less time cooking and more time enjoying good food.

Preparation time: 2 minutes. Cooking time: about 12 minutes (may be increased or decreased depending on fillet’s thickness).

Ingredients
1/4 teaspoon olive oil
1 (4-ounce) salmon fillet
Pinch of salt
Pinch of lemon pepper
Wedge of lemon

Directions
Preheat grill to medium heat. Rub olive oil over salmon, coating evenly. Sprinkle with salt and lemon pepper. Grill salmon over medium heat about 6 minutes on each side, or until it flakes easily when pierced with a fork (for ease in turning salmon, a grill basket coated with cooking spray or a wide metal spatula can be used). Remove any skin. Serve with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

Yield: 1 serving.

Serving size: 1 fillet.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 141 calories, Carbohydrates: 1 g, Protein: 23 g, Fat: 5 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Sodium: 240 mg, Fiber: <1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/simple-grilled-salmon/

One of America’s Favorites – Rotisserie Chicken

August 19, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Rotisserie chicken

Rotisserie chicken is a chicken dish that is cooked on a rotisserie, using direct heat in which the chicken is placed next to the heat source. Electric- or gas-powered heating elements may be used, which use adjustable infrared heat. These types of rotisseries have proven quite functional for cooking rotisserie-style chicken. Leftover rotisserie chicken may be used in a variety of dishes, such as soup, chicken salad, and sandwiches.

In the United States, ready-to-eat rotisserie chickens were available in supermarkets and some butcher shops during much of the twentieth century. However, they did not become a widely available option for consumers until the early 1990s, when Boston Market helped popularize the selling of packaged rotisserie chickens.

Rotisserie chickens are now highly popular. In 2010, 600 million rotisserie-cooked chickens were purchased by consumers “in U.S. supermarkets, club stores and similar retail outlets.” In 2018, over 900 million rotisserie chickens were sold by foodservice outlets and retail stores.

Rotisserie chickens are often lower in price than raw whole chickens. Two explanations are often given to justify this phenomenon. First, some grocery stores may use rotisserie chickens as loss leaders to bring shoppers into the store. The logic behind this theory is that if customers come to a store for its rotisseries chickens, they will buy other products while they are there, too. Second, rotisserie chickens are often made with poultry that is about to reach its “best by” date. By cooking and selling the chickens, the grocery stores are able to recoup some of their expenditures.

In the U.S., chickens used for rotisserie cooking may be injected with brine to retain moisture. Additional ingredients may be used to add flavor and to brown the chicken, such as oleoresin, yeast extract, sodium tripolyphosphate, and natural flavorings.

A packaged rotisserie chicken

A packaged rotisserie chicken

Costco is one of the largest producers and vendors of rotisserie chickens in the United States, with one commentator describing it as “the undisputed king of rotisserie chickens.” In 2017, Costco sold approximately 87 million rotisserie chickens in the United States. Costco’s CFO, Richard Galanti, has repeatedly rebuffed suggestions that Costco might eventually increase the cost of its chickens above $4.99, which has been the price of a Costco rotisserie chicken since 2009.

In 2017, Costco broke ground on a new 414-acre facility in Fremont, Nebraska that would include a hatchery, feed mill, and processing plant. The facility – which is expected to produce around 100 million chickens per year, or roughly 40 percent of Costco’s needs – has been reported as costing between $275 million and $400 million. The plant is scheduled to open in September 2019.

 

It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Corn-Sausage Chowder

August 17, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday is a recipe for Corn-Sausage Chowder. It’s a Comfort Food Corn-Sausage Chowder, with plenty of Meat and Potatoes! You’ll need Pork Sausage, Onion, Potatoes, Salt, Dried Marjoram, Freshly Ground Pepper, can Cream-Style Corn, can Whole-Kernel Corn, and can Evaporated Milk.Get that Chowder started! You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the CooksRecipes website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Corn-Sausage Chowder
With plenty of meat and potatoes, this delicious down-home soup makes a satisfying meal in a bowl.

Recipe Ingredients:
1 pound bulk pork sausage
1 cup coarsely chopped onion
4 cups peeled potatoes cut in 1/2-inch cubes
2 cups water
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram, crushed
1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 (17-ounce) can cream-style corn
1 (17-ounce) can whole-kernel corn, drained
1 (12-ounce) can evaporated milk

Cooking Directions:
1 – In a Dutch oven or kettle, cook the pork sausage and onion until the sausage is brown and the onion is tender. Drain mixture on paper towels.
2 – Return sausage mixture to Dutch oven. Stir in potatoes, water, salt, marjoram, and pepper. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, about 15 minutes or until potato is just tender.
3 – Add the cream-style corn, whole-kernel corn, and the evaporated milk. Heat through.
Makes 6 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/6 of recipe): calories: 529, total fat: 27g, saturated fat: 12g, cholesterol: 60mg, sodium: 1038mg, carbohydrate: 51g, fiber: 5g, protein: 18g, vitamin A: 7%, vitamin C: 42%, calcium: 18%, iron: 12%.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/soup/corn-sausage_chowder_recipe.html

Sunday’s Chicken Dinner Recipe – Spicy Chicken and Corn on the Cob

August 4, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Sunday's Chicken Dinner | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Sunday’s Chicken Dinner Recipe is Spicy Chicken and Corn on the Cob. I got a good one for this week’s recipe! For making the Chicken you’ll need; Chicken Pieces, Butter, Dijon Mustard, Cider Vinegar, Thyme, Salt, Hot Pepper Sauce, and Bread Crumbs. You’ll be baking both the Chicken and Corn on the Cob. The recipe is off the CooksRecipes website (Recipe courtesy of the National Chicken Council). At the CooksRecipes site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes that will satisfy all tastes, diets, and cuisines. Enjoy and make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Spicy Chicken and Corn on the Cob

Recipe Ingredients:
3 pounds chicken pieces
6 tablespoons butter, melted
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons hot pepper sauce
4 ears corn on the cob, husked
1/4 cup dry bread crumbs

Cooking Directions:
1 – Preheat oven to 400°F (205°C).
2 – In medium bowl, stir together melted butter, mustard, vinegar, thyme, salt and hot pepper sauce. Brush corn and chicken thoroughly with butter mixture.
3 – Arrange chicken in one layer in a baking dish. Sprinkle chicken with bread crumbs.
4 – Set corn in another baking dish; cover with aluminum foil.
5 – Bake chicken and corn for one hour; serve hot.

Makes 4 servings.

https://www.cooksrecipes.com/chicken/spicy_chicken_and_corn_on_the_cob_recipe.html

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

August 2, 2019 at 6:09 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cutting back on salt in your cooking……….

Start by selecting reduced-sodium or no-salt-added canned soups and vegetables. Always check the Nutrition Facts Label for sodium and choose products with lower sodium content. Then season foods with herbs, spices, garlic, onions, peppers and lemon or lime juice to add flavor.

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – NOT SO GUILTY BROWNIES

July 25, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dessert of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is – NOT SO GUILTY BROWNIES. Brownies, that’s all you have to say! Made using Flour, Sugar, Unsweetened Cocoa, Baking Powder, Salt, Oil, Chocolate Extract, and Eggs. Stir well and bake! Dessert without the Guilt. Only 80 calories per Brownie. You can find this recipe at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes! So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

NOT SO GUILTY BROWNIES

Recipe Yield: Servings: 24

Ingredients

Brownie Ingredients:

3/4 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 cup oil
2 tsp chocolate extract or flavor
2 eggs

Frosting Ingredients:

3/4 cup powdered sugar
1 T unsweetened cocoa
1 T skim or 2% milk
1/2 tsp chocolate extract or flavor
1/8 tsp butter flavor

Directions

1 – Heat oven to 350F.
2 – Grease bottom only of 8-inch square pan.
3 – Combine all brownie ingredients in a medium bowl and mix well. Spread in greased pan.
4 – Bake at 350 F. for 13-18 minutes, or until top is dry and springs back when touched lightly in center.
5 – Cool for 15 minutes.
6 – Meanwhile, combine all frosting ingredients in a small bowl & mix well.
7 – Spread over top of slightly cooled brownies or cut brownies into squares and drizzle with frosting (as shown, adjust milk to get the right consistency).
8 – Cool completely.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 80
Fat: 3 grams
Sodium: 50 milligrams
Cholesterol: 18 milligrams
Carbohydrates: 13 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipe/not-so-guilty-brownies

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Bacon Blue Burger

July 3, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – is a Buffalo Bacon Blue Burger. Made using Wild Idea Ground Buffalo and the Wild Idea Buffalo Bacon along with Mustard, Ketchup, Thyme, Salt, Pepper, Blue Cheese, Chokecherry or Plum Preserves and Hamburger Buns. Fantastic combination of ingredients! You can find this recipe or purchase the Ground Buffalo and the Buffalo Bacon along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

Buffalo Bacon Blue Burgers
The quintessential Buffalo Burger, complete with Buffalo Bacon, Blue Cheese and a touch of fruit preserves! This – soon to be new favorite, will have you making it again, and again and again. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

2 – 1 lb. Ground Buffalo
3 – tablespoons olive oil, plus a little more
1/2 – teaspoon mustard
2 – teaspoon ketchup
1/2 – teaspoon thyme
2 – teaspoon salt & pepper
1 – 10 oz. package Buffalo Bacon
6 – ounces blue cheese
½ – cup chokecherry or plum preserves, warmed
6 – hamburger buns

Preparation:

1 – Mix 2 tablespoons olive oil, mustard, ketchup, thyme, salt and pepper together.
2 – Mix above with Ground Buffalo until well incorporated.
3 – Divide into 6 portions and at pat out into bun size patties.
4 – In large skillet over medium high heat, add the other tablespoon of olive oil. Place buffalo bacon in pan and cook until crispy or desired doneness, turning once during cooking time.
5 – Preheat grill to high heat, 500 degrees. Insure grill grates are clean.
6 – Brush burgers with a little oil and place on grill. Close grill lid during grilling time. Grill for 1.5 minutes then turn. Repeat again on each side, grilling for a total of 6 minutes.
7 – After the last turn, top the burgers with blue cheese. Close lid and grill for an additional 3 minutes.
8 – Remove burgers from heat, cover and allow them to rest for a few minutes.
9 – Place Buffalo Blue Burgers on bun, top with crispy bacon and drizzle with a little of the warmed preserves. Delicious!
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/favorite-summertime-recipes

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Our Happy Mess

Fast. Fresh. Family-friendly.

Easy Chicken Recipes

Family-Friendly Meals

and everything nice

the story of us

My Pocket Kitchen

Easy and elegant recipes from a pro in her tiny kitchen

Authentically Vegan

Serving up authenticity with a side of veganism

Confessions of Parenting

Helping Find Simple Solutions for Busy Moms

BROOKS LATELY

Meals Made Easy

3GLOL

Got food? We do!!

Lemon Blossoms

Home-cooked recipes from a professional chef

The Gingered Whisk

Raising Adventurous Eaters through global weeknight cuisine

Pineapple House Rules

Dishing about the savory, sweet, and sometimes messy parts of life. | A Houston based food and lifestyle blog.

Random Sweetness Baking

Bake something sweet and share it.

Bake It Veggie

My vegetarian journey! | (Mostly) Easy vegetarian recipes, and more!

4 Sons 'R' Us

Fast fix, budget-friendly, family-style recipes made from scratch at home

Salt and a Smile

Cooking vegetarian with kids, one day at a time