One of America’s Favorites – Salad

June 22, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A garden salad consisting of lettuce, cucumber, scallions, cherry tomatoes, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, and feta

A salad is a dish consisting of a mixture of small pieces of food, usually vegetables or fruit. However, different varieties of salad may contain virtually any type of ready-to-eat food. Salads are typically served at room temperature or chilled, with notable exceptions such as south German potato salad which can be served warm.

Garden salads use a base of leafy greens such as lettuce, arugula/rocket, kale or spinach; they are common enough that the word salad alone often refers specifically to garden salads. Other types include bean salad, tuna salad, fattoush, Greek salad (vegetable-based, but without leafy greens), and sōmen salad (a noodle-based salad). The sauce used to flavor a salad is commonly called a salad dressing; most salad dressings are based on either a mixture of oil and vinegar or a fermented milk product like kefir.

Salads may be served at any point during a meal:

* Appetizer salads—light, smaller-portion salads served as the first course of the meal.
* Side salads—to accompany the main course as a side dish, examples include potato salad and Caesar salad.
* Main course salads—usually containing a portion of a high-protein foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, legumes, or cheese.
* Dessert salads—sweet versions containing fruit, gelatin, sweeteners or whipped cream.

Green leaf salad with salmon and bread

The Romans, ancient Greeks and Persians ate mixed greens with dressing, a type of mixed salad. Salads, including layered and dressed salads, have been popular in Europe since the Greek and Roman imperial expansions. In his 1699 book, Acetaria: A Discourse on Sallets, John Evelyn attempted with little success to encourage his fellow Britons to eat fresh salad greens. Mary, Queen of Scots, ate boiled celery root over greens covered with creamy mustard dressing, truffles, chervil, and slices of hard-boiled eggs.

Oil used on salads can be found in the 17th-century colony of New Netherland (later called New York, New Jersey and Delaware). A list of common items arriving on ships and their designated prices when appraising cargo included “a can of salad oil at 1.10 florins” and “an anker of wine vinegar at 16 florins”. In a 1665 letter to the Director of New Netherland from the Island of Curaçao there is a request to send greens: “I request most amicably that your honors be pleased to send me seed of every sort, such as cabbage, carrots, lettuce, parsley, etc. for none can be acquired here and I know that your honor has plenty,…”.

Salads may be sold in supermarkets, at restaurants and at fast food chains. In the United States, restaurants will often have a salad bar with salad-making ingredients, which the customers will use to put together their salad. Salad restaurants were earning more than $300 million in 2014. At-home salad consumption in the 2010s was rising but moving away from fresh-chopped lettuce and toward bagged greens and salad kits, with bag sales expected to reach $7 billion per year.

Types of salads

American-style potato salad with egg and mayonnaise

A salad can be a composed salad (with the ingredients specifically arranged on the serving dish) or a tossed salad (with the ingredients placed in a bowl and mixed). An antipasto plate, the first dish of a formal Italian meal, is similar to a composed salad, and has vegetables, cheese, and meat.

Green salad
A green salad or garden salad is most often composed of leafy vegetables such as lettuce varieties, spinach, or rocket (arugula). If non-greens make up a large portion of the salad it may instead be called a vegetable salad. Common raw vegetables (in the culinary sense) used in a salad include cucumbers, peppers, tomatoes, onions, carrots, celery, radishes, mushrooms, avocado, olives, artichoke hearts, heart of palm, watercress, parsley, garden beets, and green beans. Nuts, berries, seeds, and flowers are less common components. Hard-boiled eggs, bacon, shrimp, and cheeses may be used as garnishes, but large amounts of animal-based foods would be more likely in a dinner salad.

Wedge salad
A wedge salad is a specific type of green salad made from a head of lettuce (often iceberg), halved or quartered, with other ingredients on top.

Fruit salad
Fruit salads are made of fruit (in the culinary sense), which may be fresh or canned. Examples include fruit cocktail.

Rice and pasta salads
Rice and pasta may be used as the key ingredient to making a salad. Pasta salads are more common. Some examples of rice salads come from Thai cuisine, like Nasi ulam.

Bound salads
Bound salads are assembled with thick sauces such as mayonnaise. One portion of a bound salad will hold its shape when placed on a plate with a scoop. Examples of bound salad include tuna salad, chicken salad, egg salad, coleslaw, and potato salad. Some bound salads are used as sandwich fillings. Some pasta salads, i.e. macaroni salad, are bound salads. They are popular at picnics and barbecues.

Dinner salads

Ambrosia

Main course salads (known as dinner salads or as entrée salads in the United States) may contain small pieces of poultry, seafood, or steak. Caesar salad, Chef salad, Cobb salad, Chinese chicken salad and Michigan salad are dinner salads.

A wider variety of cheeses are used in dinner salads, including Roquefort blue cheese (traditional for a Cobb salad), and Swiss, Cheddar, Jack, and Provolone (for Chef and Cobb salads).

Dessert salads
Dessert salads rarely include leafy greens and are often sweet. Common variants are made with gelatin or whipped cream; e.g. jello salad, pistachio salad, and ambrosia. Other forms of dessert salads include snickers salad, glorified rice, and cookie salad.

 

Healthy Greens Recipes

November 27, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Greens Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Greens Recipes with recipes including; Winter Greens Salad with Pomegranate and Kumquats, Best Caesar Salad with Crispy Parmesan, and Slow-Cooker White Bean, Spinach and Sausage Stew. Find these recipes and many more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Greens Recipes
Find healthy, delicious greens recipes including arugula, chard, watercress and endive recipes. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Winter Greens Salad with Pomegranate and Kumquats
Kumquats deliver a piquant burst of citrus, especially when eaten skins, seeds and all. Here we toss them with a trio of greens for their vivid orange color as much as their zestiness. Pomegranate seeds and pistachios bring a jewel­like finish………………..

Best Caesar Salad with Crispy Parmesan
For a nutrient-packed twist, this healthy Caesar salad features spinach and kale in addition to romaine. But it’s the Parmesan crisps that make this salad holiday-worthy. Serve it for Thanksgiving or any other special meal…………………..

Slow-Cooker White Bean, Spinach and Sausage Stew
Reach for this recipe on a chilly morning when you know you’ll want a steaming bowl of slow-cooker sausage stew for supper. To make this recipe gluten free, use gluten-free sausage…………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Greens Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19305/ingredients/vegetables/greens/

Turkey Burger with Pastrami

May 31, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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I have another Jennie – O Turkey Burger recipe to pass along to everyone, Turkey Burger with Pastrami. To make this one you’ll be using the JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Seasoned White Turkey Patties along with toppings of Salad Dressing, Ketchup, American Cheese, Lettuce, Tomato, JENNIE-O® 95% Fat Free Turkey Pastrami, and served on Crusty Round Rolls (split and toasted). Another good one from Jennie – O! You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

Turkey Burger with Pastrami
It’s like your favorite deli sandwich and a burger combined! Pastrami and cheese are choice toppings to take this juicy turkey burger up a notch. Give this delicious recipe a try tonight!

INGREDIENTS
½ cup salad dressing
3 tablespoons ketchup
4 JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Seasoned White Turkey Patties
4 slices American cheese
4 crusty round rolls, split and toasted
1 cup shredded lettuce
4 slices tomato
3 ounces JENNIE-O® 95% Fat Free Turkey Pastrami, warmed

DIRECTIONS
1) In small bowl, combine salad dressing and ketchup; set aside
2) Cook turkey patties as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Top each burger with a cheese slice.
3) Spread ketchup mixture on rolls. Add lettuce, tomato, patties and pastrami. Cover with bun tops.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 470
Protein 34g
Carbohydrates 32g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 8g
Fat 22g
Cholesterol 100mg
Sodium 970mg
Saturated Fat 5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/710-turkey-burger-with-pastrami

 

 

Jennie – O Turkey – 95% Fat Free Turkey Pastrami
If you’re looking to add a savory, nutritious zing, JENNIE-O® 95% Fat Free Turkey Pastrami is the perfect choice! It’s ready to cut and serve, hot or cold, on your next sandwich, salad or burger. Find it in the refrigerated section of the grocery store.

*95% FAT FREE
* GLUTEN FREE
* 24-OZ PACKAGE (1.5 LBS)
Find this product in the refrigerated section of your grocery store.

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS
FULLY COOKED – READY TO EAT:
This product is fully cooked and is “Ready To Eat”.

NUTRITION INFORMATION
Serving Size 56 g

Calories 70
Total Fat 2.5 g
Saturated Fat .5 g
Trans Fat .0 g
Cholesterol 35 mg
Sodium 700 mg
Total Carbohydrates 3 g
Dietary Fiber 0 g
https://www.jennieo.com/products/109-95prc-fat-free-turkey-pastrami

One of America’s Favorites – Coleslaw

May 20, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Coleslaw made with mayonnaise

Coleslaw (from the Dutch term koolsla meaning ‘cabbage salad’), also known as cole slaw or slaw, is a salad consisting primarily of finely-shredded raw cabbage] with a salad dressing, commonly either vinaigrette or mayonnaise. Coleslaw prepared with vinaigrette may benefit from the long lifespan granted by pickling.

The term “coleslaw” arose in the 18th century as an anglicisation of the Dutch term “koolsla” (“kool” in Dutch sounds like “cole”) meaning “cabbage salad”. The “cole” part of the word comes from the Latin colis, meaning “cabbage”.

The 1770 recipe book The Sensible Cook: Dutch Foodways in the Old and New World contains a recipe attributed to the author’s Dutch landlady, who mixed thin strips of cabbage with melted butter, vinegar, and oil. The recipe for coleslaw as it is most commonly prepared is fairly young, as mayonnaise was invented during the mid-18th century.

According to The Joy of Cooking (1997), raw cabbage is the only entirely consistent ingredient in coleslaw; the type of cabbage, dressing, and added ingredients vary widely. Vinaigrette, mayonnaise, and sour cream based dressings are all listed; bacon, carrots, bell peppers, pineapple, pickles, onions, and herbs are specifically mentioned as possible added ingredients.

In America, what most think of as today’s coleslaw originated with the arrival and creation of mayonnaise in the 18th century, but many international coleslaws don’t contain mayonnaise — or even cabbage. Coleslaws can be a light crunchy blend of julienne or grated vegetables tossed in vinaigrette, or shredded vegetables with nonfat Greek yogurt combined with spices and herbs.

Coleslaw is generally eaten as a side dish with foods such as fried chicken and barbecued meats and may be accompanied by French fries or potato salad as another side dish. It also may be used as a sandwich ingredient, being placed on barbecue sandwiches, hamburgers, and hot dogs along with chili and hot mustard. A vinegar-based coleslaw is the signature ingredient to a Primanti Brothers sandwich. Coleslaw also is used on a variant of the Reuben sandwich, with coleslaw substituting for the sauerkraut; the sandwich is commonly called a Rachel to differentiate it from the Reuben.

Coleslaw has an extremely low glycemic index (cabbage 10) and glycemic load (cabbage 0.58) and is rich in fiber.

Purple cabbage coleslaw

There are many variations of the recipe, which include the addition of other ingredients such as red cabbage, pepper, shredded carrots, onion, grated cheese, pineapple, or apple, mixed with a salad dressing such as mayonnaise or cream. A variety of seasonings, such as celery seed, may be added. The cabbage may come in finely minced pieces, shredded strips, or small squares. Other slaw variants include broccoli slaw, which uses shredded raw broccoli in place of the cabbage. Cream, sour cream, or buttermilk are also popular additions. Buttermilk coleslaw is most commonly found in the southern United States.

In the United States, coleslaw often contains buttermilk, mayonnaise or mayonnaise substitutes, and carrot, although many regional variations exist, and recipes incorporating prepared mustard or vinegar without the dairy and mayonnaise are also common. Barbecue slaw, also known as red slaw, is made using ketchup and vinegar rather than mayonnaise. It is frequently served alongside North Carolina barbecue, including Lexington style barbecue, where, unlike in the rest of the state, a red slaw is the prevailing variety.

Crunchy, Colorful Salads with Protein-Packed Ingredients

August 19, 2017 at 5:36 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its – Crunchy, Colorful Salads with Protein-Packed Ingredients. Kick up those Salads with recipes like; Lobster Roll Salad with Bacon Vinaigrette, Buffalo-Spiced Steak Salads with Blue Cheese Dressing, and Asian Pork and Cabbage Salad. Find these and much more all at the Diabetic Living Online website. enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Crunchy, Colorful Salads with Protein-Packed Ingredients
Eating a salad shouldn’t feel like punishment. Our diabetic salads are tasty, filling, and feature a variety of healthy ingredients that keep you feeling full and satisfied. Piled high with sources of lean protein and vegetables, our salads are so good your body will thank you.

 

Lobster Roll Salad with Bacon Vinaigrette

Get ready to share photos of this gorgeous salad with your friends. They’ll want to come over and try this gourmet-worthy meal for themselves. The recipe yields six servings, so there‘s enough to go around…….

 

Buffalo-Spiced Steak Salads with Blue Cheese Dressing

If your family balks at the idea of salad for dinner, break out this beefy recipe that features its own homemade blue cheese dressing. You can even fire up the grill before placing the spicy grilled steak slices on a crisp bed of mixed greens……..

 

Asian Pork and Cabbage Salad

If you have a big appetite, this crunchy salad is for you. Enjoy a 2-cup serving that has just 16 grams of carb. You can whip together this quick and easy diabetic dinner in about 20 minutes…..

 

* Click the link below to get all the – Crunchy, Colorful Salads with Protein-Packed Ingredients
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/salad/crunchy-colorful-salads-protein-packed-ingredients

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Turkey Bacon Summer Salad

September 2, 2016 at 4:44 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is a Turkey Bacon Summer Salad. Made with JENNIE-O® Turkey Bacon along with broccoli, cauliflower, Sharp Cheddar Cheese, red Onion, Salad Dressing, White Sugar, and White Vinegar. As Jennie – O describes it a “Grilling Menu Summer Fiesta”. You can find this recipe along with all the other delicious and healthy recipe at the Jennie- O website. https://www.jennieo.com/

 

 

Turkey Bacon Summer Salad

INGREDIENTS

6 slices JENNIE-O® Turkey Bacon, crumbleTurkey Bacon Summer Salad
1 head fresh broccoli, diced
1 small head cauliflower, chopped
¾ cup shredded sharp Cheddar cheese
¼ red onion, chopped
½ cup creamy salad dressing
½ cup white sugar
2 tablespoons white vinegar

 
DIRECTIONS

1) Cook turkey bacon as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Set aside.
2) In large bowl, add broccoli, cauliflower, cheese and onion; mix together. In small bowl, whisk salad dressing, sugar and vinegar until sugar is dissolved; pour over broccoli mixture and toss to coat. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes.
3) Stir crumbled bacon into salad just before serving.

* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING
Calories180
Protein7g
Carbohydrates26gJennie O Make the Switch
Fiber3g
Sugars17g
Fat6g
Cholesterol20mg
Sodium330mg
Saturated Fat3g

https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/947-turkey-bacon-summer-salad

Condiment of the Week – Salad Dressing

May 19, 2016 at 5:04 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | 1 Comment
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A dish of American-style Italian dressing.

A dish of American-style Italian dressing.

Sauces for salads are often called “dressings”. The concept of salad dressing varies across cultures.

In Western culture, there are two basic types of salad dressing:

Vinaigrette;
Creamy dressings, usually based on mayonnaise or fermented milk products, such as yogurt, sour cream (crème fraîche, smetana), buttermilk;
Vinaigrette /vɪnəˈɡrɛt/ is a mixture (emulsion) of salad oil and vinegar, often flavored with herbs, spices, salt, pepper, sugar, and other ingredients. It is also used as a sauce or marinade.

In North America, mayonnaise-based Ranch dressing is most popular, with vinaigrettes and Caesar-style dressing following close behind. Traditional dressings in France are vinaigrettes, typically mustard-based, while sour cream (smetana) and mayonnaise are predominant in eastern European countries and Russia. In Denmark, dressings are often based on crème fraîche. In southern Europe, salad is generally dressed by the diner with olive oil and vinegar.

 

In Asia, it is common to add sesame oil, fish sauce, citrus juice, or soy sauce to salad dressings.
The following are examples of common salad dressings:
* Blue cheese dressing

Thousand Island dressing on a salad

Thousand Island dressing on a salad

* Caesar dressing
* Extra virgin olive oil
* French dressing
* Ginger dressing
* Honey Dijon
* Hummus
* Italian dressing
* Louis dressing
* Ranch dressing
* Russian dressing
* Tahini
* Thousand Island dressing
* Vinaigrette
* Wafu dressing

 

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

April 14, 2015 at 5:29 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Have a salad….

 

* For rich, creamy dressings made healthy, substitute half the mayo with Greek-style yogurt.

 
* Leftover Mustard try this…. If you have just a tiny bit of mustard left in the jar, toss in some extra ingredients, some olive oil, and vinegar, and just shake a fresh salad dressing up right there in the jar! That way your last bit of mustard gets turned into a tangy Dijon dressing for salad, chicken, or roast vegetables.

 
* Have a Salad…. All green leaves contain the vitamins. All green leaves are rich in minerals. Many of these are more effective in their raw state than when cooked.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 22, 2014 at 6:27 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When making your own salad dressing, kick it up a notch….

 

For rich, creamy dressings made healthy, substitute half the mayo with Greek-style yogurt.

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