One of America’s Favorites – Salad

June 22, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A garden salad consisting of lettuce, cucumber, scallions, cherry tomatoes, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, and feta

A salad is a dish consisting of a mixture of small pieces of food, usually vegetables or fruit. However, different varieties of salad may contain virtually any type of ready-to-eat food. Salads are typically served at room temperature or chilled, with notable exceptions such as south German potato salad which can be served warm.

Garden salads use a base of leafy greens such as lettuce, arugula/rocket, kale or spinach; they are common enough that the word salad alone often refers specifically to garden salads. Other types include bean salad, tuna salad, fattoush, Greek salad (vegetable-based, but without leafy greens), and sōmen salad (a noodle-based salad). The sauce used to flavor a salad is commonly called a salad dressing; most salad dressings are based on either a mixture of oil and vinegar or a fermented milk product like kefir.

Salads may be served at any point during a meal:

* Appetizer salads—light, smaller-portion salads served as the first course of the meal.
* Side salads—to accompany the main course as a side dish, examples include potato salad and Caesar salad.
* Main course salads—usually containing a portion of a high-protein foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, legumes, or cheese.
* Dessert salads—sweet versions containing fruit, gelatin, sweeteners or whipped cream.

Green leaf salad with salmon and bread

The Romans, ancient Greeks and Persians ate mixed greens with dressing, a type of mixed salad. Salads, including layered and dressed salads, have been popular in Europe since the Greek and Roman imperial expansions. In his 1699 book, Acetaria: A Discourse on Sallets, John Evelyn attempted with little success to encourage his fellow Britons to eat fresh salad greens. Mary, Queen of Scots, ate boiled celery root over greens covered with creamy mustard dressing, truffles, chervil, and slices of hard-boiled eggs.

Oil used on salads can be found in the 17th-century colony of New Netherland (later called New York, New Jersey and Delaware). A list of common items arriving on ships and their designated prices when appraising cargo included “a can of salad oil at 1.10 florins” and “an anker of wine vinegar at 16 florins”. In a 1665 letter to the Director of New Netherland from the Island of Curaçao there is a request to send greens: “I request most amicably that your honors be pleased to send me seed of every sort, such as cabbage, carrots, lettuce, parsley, etc. for none can be acquired here and I know that your honor has plenty,…”.

Salads may be sold in supermarkets, at restaurants and at fast food chains. In the United States, restaurants will often have a salad bar with salad-making ingredients, which the customers will use to put together their salad. Salad restaurants were earning more than $300 million in 2014. At-home salad consumption in the 2010s was rising but moving away from fresh-chopped lettuce and toward bagged greens and salad kits, with bag sales expected to reach $7 billion per year.

Types of salads

American-style potato salad with egg and mayonnaise

A salad can be a composed salad (with the ingredients specifically arranged on the serving dish) or a tossed salad (with the ingredients placed in a bowl and mixed). An antipasto plate, the first dish of a formal Italian meal, is similar to a composed salad, and has vegetables, cheese, and meat.

Green salad
A green salad or garden salad is most often composed of leafy vegetables such as lettuce varieties, spinach, or rocket (arugula). If non-greens make up a large portion of the salad it may instead be called a vegetable salad. Common raw vegetables (in the culinary sense) used in a salad include cucumbers, peppers, tomatoes, onions, carrots, celery, radishes, mushrooms, avocado, olives, artichoke hearts, heart of palm, watercress, parsley, garden beets, and green beans. Nuts, berries, seeds, and flowers are less common components. Hard-boiled eggs, bacon, shrimp, and cheeses may be used as garnishes, but large amounts of animal-based foods would be more likely in a dinner salad.

Wedge salad
A wedge salad is a specific type of green salad made from a head of lettuce (often iceberg), halved or quartered, with other ingredients on top.

Fruit salad
Fruit salads are made of fruit (in the culinary sense), which may be fresh or canned. Examples include fruit cocktail.

Rice and pasta salads
Rice and pasta may be used as the key ingredient to making a salad. Pasta salads are more common. Some examples of rice salads come from Thai cuisine, like Nasi ulam.

Bound salads
Bound salads are assembled with thick sauces such as mayonnaise. One portion of a bound salad will hold its shape when placed on a plate with a scoop. Examples of bound salad include tuna salad, chicken salad, egg salad, coleslaw, and potato salad. Some bound salads are used as sandwich fillings. Some pasta salads, i.e. macaroni salad, are bound salads. They are popular at picnics and barbecues.

Dinner salads

Ambrosia

Main course salads (known as dinner salads or as entrée salads in the United States) may contain small pieces of poultry, seafood, or steak. Caesar salad, Chef salad, Cobb salad, Chinese chicken salad and Michigan salad are dinner salads.

A wider variety of cheeses are used in dinner salads, including Roquefort blue cheese (traditional for a Cobb salad), and Swiss, Cheddar, Jack, and Provolone (for Chef and Cobb salads).

Dessert salads
Dessert salads rarely include leafy greens and are often sweet. Common variants are made with gelatin or whipped cream; e.g. jello salad, pistachio salad, and ambrosia. Other forms of dessert salads include snickers salad, glorified rice, and cookie salad.

 

Kitchen Closed – Mom’s Birthday!

February 12, 2020 at 6:55 PM | Posted in BEEF, Food | 5 Comments
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No Dinner post tonight, the Kitchen is closed for Mom’s 92nd Birthday! I’m taking her and her sister (my Aunt) to the Texas Roadhouse for Steak tonight. Kitchen reopens tomorrow! Take Care all and Happy Birthday Mom!

 

Bountiful Harvest Vegetable Salad

October 9, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, salad | 1 Comment
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I came across this salad, Bountiful Harvest Vegetable Salad, at the Diabetes Self Management website and wanted to pass it along to every one! Some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are Onion, Garlic, Brown Sugar, Turnips, Baby Salad Greens, and Walnut Pieces. Again you can find this recipe along with all the other Diabetes Friendly Recipes at the Diabetes Self Management website. So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Bountiful Harvest Vegetable Salad
Ingredients
1 tablespoon hazelnut or olive oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
3/4 cup malt vinegar
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 cup chopped parsnips
1 cup chopped turnips
1/2 cup parsley and cilantro leaves
3 cups baby salad greens
1/2 cup toasted walnut pieces
1 cup chopped radish
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions
1 – Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onions and cook until golden brown, 5–7 minutes. Add garlic and cook for 30 seconds more. Stir in vinegar and sugar and bring just to a simmer. Remove from heat and keep dressing warm.

2 – Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add parsnips and turnips and simmer until vegetables are just tender, 8–10 minutes. Drain well.

3 – Arrange parsley, cilantro, and salad greens on a platter and top with hot vegetables. Garnish with walnuts and radish. Drizzle with warm dressing, and serve immediately.

Yield: 6 servings.

Serving size: 1/6 of recipe.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 145 calories, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 9 g, Saturated Fat: 8 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 45 mg, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/salads/bountiful-harvest-vegetable-salad/

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Tuscan Bean Salad with Gorgonzola Bruschetta

July 1, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is – Tuscan Bean Salad with Gorgonzola Bruschetta. Made using Cannelloni Beans, Tomatoes, Garlic, Creamy Mustard Sauce, Gorgonzola, then served over Salad Greens and all served on Bruschetta! The recipe is from one of my favorite sites, the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge and varied selection of recipes so be sure to check it out soon. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Tuscan Bean Salad with Gorgonzola Bruschetta
This beautifully presented salad combines canned cannelloni beans, tomatoes and garlic in a creamy mustard sauce. The mixture is served over salad greens surrounded by Gorgonzola topped bruschetta.

Recipe Ingredients:
Bruschetta:
1/2 cup (2-ounces) crumbled Gorgonzola cheese
2 teaspoons olive oil
1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
16 slices French baguette (1 pound loaf), each 1/2-inch thick

Salad:
2 (19-ounce each) cans cannelloni beans, rinsed, drained*
2 medium fennel bulbs, thinly sliced (optional)
4 medium plum tomatoes, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
3/4 cup light or fat free mayonnaise
3/4 cup white wine vinegar
1/4 cup Equal® Spoonful**
3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 (10-ounce) package mixed salad greens

Cooking Directions:
1 – Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C).
2 – For Bruschetta, combine Gorgonzola, oil and black pepper. Spread on bread slices. Place on baking sheet. Bake 10 to 15 minutes or until edges of bread are golden. Remove slices to wire rack to cool.
3 – Meanwhile, for Salad, combine beans, fennel, tomatoes and garlic in large bowl.
4 – Whisk mayonnaise, vinegar, Equal®, mustard, salt and pepper to blend. Toss greens with enough mayonnaise mixture to coat. Place greens in center of a large serving platter.
5 – Toss bean mixture with remaining dressing. Place over greens. Place bruschetta around edges of platter.
Makes 16 servings.

*May substitute canned Great Northern Beans

**May substitute 6 packets Equal sweetener

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/16 of recipe): calories 181, protein 7 g, carbohydrate 28 g, fat 7 g, cholesterol 7 mg, sodium 701 mg.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/tuscan_bean_salad_with_gorgonzola_bruschetta_recipe.html

Quinoa Cobb Salad Shaker

June 14, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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For a second recipe from the Jennie – O website I have a recipe for a Quinoa Cobb Salad Shaker. This one uses 2 Jennie -O Turkey Products; JENNIE-O® Oven Roasted Turkey Breast and the JENNIE-O® Turkey Ham. You’ll also need Reduced Sodium Chicken Broth, Quinoa, Carrots, Romaine Lettuce, Tomatoes, Shredded Cheddar Cheese, and Italian salad Dressing. Plus it all comes in a Shaker To Go Cup so you can have it anywhere! You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

Quinoa Cobb Salad Shaker
Shake up your lunch routine with this Quinoa Cobb Salad Shaker recipe. It’s everything you love about a classic cob in an easy, take-with-you-anywhere cup. With layers of savory flavor, this salad shaker makes lunchtime on the go anything but forgettable.

INGREDIENTS
1½ cups quinoa
1½ cups reduced sodium chicken broth
1½ cups water
1½ cups shredded carrots
¾ cup diced JENNIE-O® Oven Roasted Turkey Breast
¾ cup diced JENNIE-O® Turkey Ham
3 cups chopped romaine lettuce
18 cherry tomatoes
¾ cup shredded Cheddar cheese
6 ounces Italian salad dressing

DIRECTIONS
1) In saucepan, mix quinoa with chicken broth and water. Bring to boil and cover, reduce heat and simmer 15 minutes or until cooked. Fluff with fork and cool.
2) In 6 shaker containers, layer quinoa, carrots, turkey, ham, romaine, tomatoes and cheese. Serve with Italian dressing.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 220
Protein 17g
Carbohydrates 18g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 5g
Fat 10g
Cholesterol 30mg
Sodium 760mg
Saturated Fat 3.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1248-quinoa-cobb-salad-shaker

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Steak, Potato and Green Bean Salad

April 24, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is a Steak, Potato and Green Bean Salad. Your Dinner all served into one bowl! You have a Wild Idea Buffalo Ribeye or New York Strip Steak, Potatoes (Steamed or Boiled), and your Salad. The Wild Idea Buffalo Ribeye or New York Strip Steak is good enough alone but add the Potatoes and Salad, it’s a Meal! You can find this recipe or purchase the Wild Idea Steaks along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

Steak, Potato and Green Bean Salad
It’s hard not to love a salad that has both meat and potatoes in it! Of course the green stuff makes for a well balanced meal that will leave you completely satiated. And, the garlic, lemon and herb vinaigrette, you’ll want to make again and again.

Ingredients: (serves 2 to 3)
1 – 10 oz. Ribeye or New York Strip Steak (or other cut would work too)
2 to 3 – medium-sized potatoes, steamed or boiled
1/4 – pound fresh green beans, stem end clipped
1 – tomato or cherry tomatoes, chopped
Optional: Crumbled Feta Cheese, Fennel Fronds, or green onion for garnish
Greek Vinaigrette

Preparation:

1 – Prep steak, by rinsing under cold water and blotting dry. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper. Allow to rest at room temperature for about two hours.
2 – Quarter the potatoes after they are steamed or boiled. You can also pan fry in a little olive oil to lightly brown.
3 – Steam or pan sauté green beans until el dente.
4 – Grill the steak according to thickness, three to four minutes each side, turning at one and a half minute intervals. Remove the steak from the grill, tent with foil and allow to rest for 5 minutes.
5 – Arrange potatoes and green beans on the plates.
6 – Slice the steak thin and divide between plates.
7 – Add the tomatoes and drizzle the whole salad with the vinaigrette.
8 – Garnish with feta cheese and fennel fronds. Season with a little finishing salt and fresh cracked pepper to taste.

Greek Vinaigrette:
Ingredients:
1/3 – cup white wine vinegar
1 – tablespoon fresh squeezed lemon juice
1/3 – cup extra virgin olive oil
1 to 2 – garlic cloves
¼ – cup fresh basil leaves
4 – green onions, white part only, chopped (reserve greens for garnish)
2 – teaspoons oregano
1 – tablespoon crushed fennel
1 – teaspoon black pepper
½ teaspoon salt

* Preparation: Mix all ingredients in blender until well incorporated. Transfer to a lidded container until ready to serve. Shake before drizzling onto salad. Keeps well in the refrigerator.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/sensational-steak-salads

Healthy Snap Pea Recipes

April 14, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Snap Pea Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Snap Pea Recipes including recipes like; Creamy Salmon and Sugar Snap Cauliflower Gnocchi, Better Three-Bean Salad, and Beef-Vegetable Ragout. Find these recipes and more at EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Snap Pea Recipes
Find healthy, delicious snap pea recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Creamy Salmon and Sugar Snap Cauliflower Gnocchi
Tender cauliflower gnocchi combine with a quick cream sauce, tender peas and flaky salmon for an unforgettable weeknight dinner. This one is so good you might make it for special occasions. If you don’t like smoked salmon, use fresh………..

Better Three-Bean Salad
Traditional three-bean salad gets a healthy, fresh spin with the addition of black soybeans, snap peas and a tarragon-infused dressing. Find black soybeans near other canned beans; they’re a sweeter, creamier relative of the green ones you’re probably familiar with………..

Beef-Vegetable Ragout
This recipe fits the bill for casual get-togethers, and it’s prepared in only 30 minutes. Spoon the mixture over pasta and serve with crusty bread or corn bread and wedges of melon………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Snap Pea Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/20766/ingredients/vegetables/peas/snap/

The Kitchen is Closed, Outback Steakhouse Tonight!

March 27, 2019 at 6:34 PM | Posted in BEEF | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: 8 oz. Center Cut Sirloin and Homestyle Mashed Potatoes

 

For Breakfast this morning I Scrambled a couple of Eggs, toasted 2 slices of Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread, and had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Beautiful Spring Day out there today, 60 degrees and sunny! After Breakfast did a load of laundry and then some light cleaning of the house. Later on I got the cart out of shed and cleaned it up a bit and then took a spin around the neighborhood. Good to be outside! Mom had been wanting a Steak Dinner from OutBack Steakhouse so the Kitchen is Closed Tonight!

 

 

 

 

 

We both had a 8 oz. Center Cut Sirloin Steak. I had Homestyle Mashed Potatoes and Salad. Mom had a Baked Potato, Roll, and Salad. The Steaks were cooked perfect and so moist and flavorful! Best Steak we’ve had in a while from OutBack. Last couple of times the Steaks were not worth the money, but good job with these! For Dessert/Snack later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn and a Diet Mango Snapple to drink. Kitchen reopens tomorrow, take care!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OutBack SIGNATURE STEAKS
Outback steaks are served with a choice of signature potato and one freshly made side, side salad or cup of soup.

OUTBACK CENTER-CUT SIRLOIN*
Center-cut for tenderness. Lean, hearty and full of flavor. Seasoned and seared on our hot grill.

HOMESTYLE MASHED POTATOES
Creamy mashed Idaho potatoes.
https://www.outback.com/

One of America’s Favorites – Sauerkraut

December 31, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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German sauerkraut

Sauerkraut (/ˈsaʊ.ərkraʊt/; German: [ˈzaʊɐˌkʁaʊt] is finely cut raw cabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria. It has a long shelf life and a distinctive sour flavor, both of which result from the lactic acid formed when the bacteria ferment the sugars in the cabbage leaves.

Fermented foods have a long history in many cultures, with sauerkraut being one of the most well-known instances of traditional fermented moist cabbage side dishes. The Roman writers Cato (in his De Agri Cultura) and Columella (in his De re Rustica) mentioned preserving cabbages and turnips with salt.

Sauerkraut originally came from China, from where it was brought over to Europe by the Tatars. The Tatars improved upon the original Chinese recipe by fermenting it with salt instead of rice wine. Another claim is that the dish was brought over by the Mongol Emperor Genghis Khan. It then took root mostly in Central and Eastern European cuisines, but also in other countries including the Netherlands, where it is known as zuurkool, and France, where the name became choucroute. The English name is borrowed from German where it means literally “sour herb” or “sour cabbage”. The names in Slavic and other Central and Eastern European languages have similar meanings with the German word: “fermented cabbage” (Albanian: lakër turshi, Belarusian: квашаная капуста, Czech: kysané zelí, Polish: kiszona kapusta or kwaszona kapusta, Lithuanian: rauginti kopūstai, Russian: квашеная капуста, tr. kvashenaya kapusta, Ukrainian: квашена капуста) or “sour cabbage” (Bulgarian: кисело зеле, Croatian: kiselo zelje, Czech: kyselé zelí, Estonian: hapukapsas, Finnish: hapankaali, Hungarian: savanyúkáposzta, Latvian: skābēti kāposti, Romanian: varză murată, Russian: кислая капуста, tr. kislaya kapusta, Serbian: kiseli kupus, Slovak: kyslá kapusta, Slovene: kislo zelje, Ukrainian: кисла капуста, kisla kapusta).

Before frozen foods, refrigeration, and cheap transport from warmer areas became readily available in northern, central and eastern Europe, sauerkraut – like other preserved foods – provided a source of nutrients during the winter. James Cook always took a store of sauerkraut on his sea voyages, since experience had taught him it prevented scurvy.

The word “Kraut”, derived from this food, is a derogatory term for the German people. During World War I, due to concerns the American public would reject a product with a German name, American sauerkraut makers relabeled their product as “Liberty Cabbage” for the duration of the war.

Homemade sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is made by a process of pickling called lactic acid fermentation that is analogous to how traditional (not heat-treated) pickled cucumbers and kimchi are made. The cabbage is finely shredded, layered with salt, and left to ferment. Fully cured sauerkraut keeps for several months in an airtight container stored at 15 °C (60 °F) or below. Neither refrigeration nor pasteurization is required, although these treatments prolong storage life.

Fermentation by lactobacilli is introduced naturally, as these air-borne bacteria culture on raw cabbage leaves where they grow. Yeasts also are present, and may yield soft sauerkraut of poor flavor when the fermentation temperature is too high. The fermentation process has three phases, collectively sometimes referred to as population dynamics. In the first phase, anaerobic bacteria such as Klebsiella and Enterobacter lead the fermentation, and begin producing an acidic environment that favors later bacteria. The second phase starts as the acid levels become too high for many bacteria, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides and other Leuconostoc spp. take dominance. In the third phase, various Lactobacillus species, including L. brevis and L. plantarum, ferment any remaining sugars, further lowering the pH. Properly cured sauerkraut is sufficiently acidic to prevent a favorable environment for the growth of Clostridium botulinum, the toxins of which cause botulism.

A 2004 genomic study found an unexpectedly large diversity of lactic acid bacteria in sauerkraut, and that previous studies had oversimplified this diversity. Weissella was found to be a major organism in the initial, heterofermentative stage, up to day 7. It was also found that Lactobacillus brevis and Pediococcus pentosaceus had smaller population numbers in the first 14 days than previous studies had reported.

The Dutch sauerkraut industry found that inoculating a new batch of sauerkraut with an old batch resulted in an excessively sour product. This sourdough process is known as “backslopping” or “inoculum enrichment”; when used in making sauerkraut, first- and second-stage population dynamics, important to developing flavor, are bypassed. This is due primarily to the greater initial activity of species L. plantarum.

Regional varieties

Eastern European style sauerkraut pickled with carrots and served as a salad

In Belarusian, Polish, Russian, Baltic country and Ukrainian cuisine, chopped cabbage is often pickled together with shredded carrots. Other ingredients may include whole or quartered apples for additional flavor or cranberry for flavor and better keeping (the benzoic acid in cranberries is a common preservative). Bell peppers and beets are added in some recipes for color. The resulting sauerkraut salad is typically served cold, as a zakuski or a side dish. There is also a home made type of very mild sauerkraut where white cabbage is pickled with salt in a refrigerator for only between three and seven days. This results in very little lactic acid being produced. Sometimes in Russia the double fermentation is used, with the initial step producing an exceptionally sour product, which is then “corrected” by adding 30-50% more fresh cabbage and fermenting the mix again. The flavor additives like apples, beets, cranberries and sometimes even watermelons are usually introduced at this step.

Many health benefits have been claimed for sauerkraut:

* It is a source of vitamins B, C, and K; the fermentation process increases the bioavailability of nutrients rendering sauerkraut even more nutritious than the original cabbage. It is also low in calories and high in calcium and magnesium, and it is a very good source of dietary fiber, folate, iron, potassium, copper and manganese.
* If unpasteurized and uncooked, sauerkraut also contains live lactobacilli and beneficial microbes and is rich in enzymes. Fiber and probiotics improve digestion and promote the growth of healthy bowel flora, protecting against many diseases of the digestive tract.
* During the American Civil War, the physician John Jay Terrell (1829–1922) was able to successfully reduce the death rate from disease among prisoners of war; he attributed this to feeding his patients raw sauerkraut.
* Sauerkraut and its juice is a time-honored folk remedy for canker sores. The treatment is to rinse the mouth with sauerkraut juice for about 30 seconds several times a day, or place a wad of sauerkraut against the affected area for a minute or so before chewing and swallowing the sauerkraut.
* In 2002, the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry reported that Finnish researchers found the isothiocyanates produced in sauerkraut fermentation inhibit the growth of cancer cells in test tube and animal studies. A Polish study in 2010 concluded that “induction of the key detoxifying enzymes by cabbage juices, particularly sauerkraut, may be responsible for their chemopreventive activity demonstrated by epidemiological studies and in animal models”.
* Sauerkraut is high in the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, both associated with preserving ocular health.

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Steak, Potato and Green Bean Salad

September 5, 2018 at 5:03 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | 2 Comments
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is – Steak, Potato and Green Bean Salad. Your Dinner all rolled into one bowl! You have a Wild Idea Buffalo Ribeye or New York Strip Steak, Potatoes (Steamed or Boiled), and your Salad. The Wild Idea Buffalo Ribeye or New York Strip Steak is good enough alone but add the Potatoes and Salad, it’s a Meal! You can find this recipe or purchase the Wild Idea Steaks, along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

Steak, Potato and Green Bean Salad
It’s hard not to love a salad that has both meat and potatoes in it! Of course the green stuff makes for a well balanced meal that will leave you completely satiated. And, the garlic, lemon and herb vinaigrette, you’ll want to make again and again.

Ingredients: (serves 2 to 3)
1 – 10 oz. Ribeye or New York Strip Steak (or other cut would work too)
2 to 3 – medium-sized potatoes, steamed or boiled
1/4 – pound fresh green beans, stem end clipped
1 – tomato or cherry tomatoes, chopped
Optional: Crumbled Feta Cheese, Fennel Fronds, or green onion for garnish
Greek Vinaigrette

Preparation:

1 – Prep steak, by rinsing under cold water and blotting dry. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper. Allow to rest at room temperature for about two hours.
2 – Quarter the potatoes after they are steamed or boiled. You can also pan fry in a little olive oil to lightly brown.
3 – Steam or pan sauté green beans until el dente.
4 – Grill the steak according to thickness, three to four minutes each side, turning at one and a half minute intervals. Remove the steak from the grill, tent with foil and allow to rest for 5 minutes.
5 – Arrange potatoes and green beans on the plates.
6 – Slice the steak thin and divide between plates.
7 – Add the tomatoes and drizzle the whole salad with the vinaigrette.
8 – Garnish with feta cheese and fennel fronds. Season with a little finishing salt and fresh cracked pepper to taste.

Greek Vinaigrette:
Ingredients:
1/3 – cup white wine vinegar
1 – tablespoon fresh squeezed lemon juice
1/3 – cup extra virgin olive oil
1 to 2 – garlic cloves
¼ – cup fresh basil leaves
4 – green onions, white part only, chopped (reserve greens for garnish)
2 – teaspoons oregano
1 – tablespoon crushed fennel
1 – teaspoon black pepper
½ teaspoon salt

* Preparation: Mix all ingredients in blender until well incorporated. Transfer to a lidded container until ready to serve. Shake before drizzling onto salad. Keeps well in the refrigerator.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/sensational-steak-salads

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