Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 29, 2015 at 5:56 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Bread or Rolls leftover from dinner or going stale……..

 
A great way to use a stale loaf of bread or rolls is to make croutons! Cut up into blocks, fry up for a minute or so with some butter and oil and sprinkle on seasoning of choice, Garlic Salt and italian Herbs work well. Then toast in the oven! The leftovers can be frozen and used as needed.

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Our Best Diabetic Cake Recipes

November 1, 2015 at 6:03 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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Passing along some Diabetic Friendly Cake Recipes. From the Diabetic Living Online website it’s Our Best Diabetic Cake Recipes. Chocolate Cake, Berry Cake, or Coffee Cake, it’s all here. You can these recipes and more on the Diabetic Living Online website. http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 
Our Best Diabetic Cake RecipesDiabetic living logo

Our favorite diabetic cake recipes are sure to please your sweet tooth and your blood sugar. We used sugar substitutes and light frostings to keep the diabetic desserts low in calories and carbs. Whether you prefer a rich chocolate cake, gorgeous berry cake, or moist coffee cake, we’ve got fresh, diabetes-friendly recipes that you can enjoy guilt-free!

 

 

Cinnamon-Banana Cake with Chocolate Ganache

In this chocolate-covered cake recipe, bananas lend irresistible moistness, while whole wheat pastry flour makes the diabetic cake a hearty dessert option…..

 
Red Velvet Cake Roll

For a fun twist on the traditional red velvet cake, we filled our rolled version with light cream filling. The result: A low-calorie dessert that’s just as decadent as the original…..

 
Lemon-Berry Pudding Cake

Enlist the help of a slow cooker to make this easy cake recipe! We love the way lemon complements the blueberries and raspberries in the flavorful dessert that practically makes itself……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the “Our Best Diabetic Cake Recipes”

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/dessert/our-best-diabetic-cake-recipes

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 25, 2015 at 4:51 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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A baking hint….

 

Breads and pies bake best and will have the best crust when baked in a dark-colored pan that absorbs heat well. Cookies, biscuits and cakes do better in a shiny pan that reflects the heat for a more delicate browning of the crust.

One of America’s Favorites – Lobster Roll

January 19, 2015 at 6:34 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 5 Comments
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A lobster roll from "The Lobster Claw" in Bar Harbor, Maine

A lobster roll from “The Lobster Claw” in Bar Harbor, Maine

A traditional lobster roll is a sandwich filled with lobster meat soaked in butter and served on a steamed hot dog bun or similar roll, so that the opening is on the top rather than on the side. There are variations of this sandwich made in other parts of New England, which may contain diced celery or scallion, and mayonnaise. The sandwich may also contain lettuce, lemon juice, salt and black pepper. Traditional New England restaurants serve lobster rolls (made with butter, not mayonnaise) with potato chips or french fries on the side.[citation needed] The lobster roll was first originated at a restaurant named Perry’s, in Milford, Connecticut as early as 1929, according to John Mariani’s,

 

“Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink.” Once Perry’s put the new sandwich on its menu, its popularity spread up and down the Connecticut coast, but not far beyond. For those residing in Connecticut, a lobster roll served warm is simply called a “lobster roll” while the lobster roll served cold as it is throughout the rest of the northeast region and the world is called a “lobster salad roll” . The lobster salad roll took off on the Eastern End of Long Island, New York, starting in 1965, pioneered by the Lobster Roll Restaurant The Lobster Roll.

 

 

As far back as 1970, chopped lobster meat heated in drawn butter was served on a hot dog bun at road side stands such as Red’s Eats in Maine, Lobster rolls in the U.S. are associated with the state of Maine, but are also commonly available at seafood restaurants in the other New England states and on Eastern Long Island, where lobster fishing is common. They tend to be virtually unheard-of in landlocked regions (such as the Upper Midwest), where fresh lobster is more expensive and more difficult to obtain.

Lobster rolls prepared in Maine generally have several common characteristics: first, the roll itself is a “New England” or “Frankfurter” roll that is baked slightly differently from a standard hot dog roll, so the sides are flat and can be buttered on the outside and lightly grilled or toasted, and is split on the top instead of the side; second, the lobster meat in the roll is usually served cold, rather than warm or hot; third, there can be a very light spread of mayonnaise inside the bun or tossed with the meat before filling the roll, though usually do not have any other ingredients typical of the “lobster salad” variation in other parts of New England. The lobster meat is usually knuckle, claw, and tail meat chunks, with 4oz of meat (“1/4 pound”) the common advertised serving size.

They are a staple summer meal throughout the Maritime provinces in Canada, particularly Nova Scotia where they may also appear on hamburger buns, baguettes, or other types of bread rolls — even pita pockets. The traditional sides are potato chips and dill pickles.

 

 

McDonald's McLobster lobster roll sandwich

McDonald’s McLobster lobster roll sandwich

McDonald’s McLobster lobster roll sandwich
Some McDonald’s restaurants in New England and the Canadian Maritimes offer lobster rolls as a seasonal menu item when McDonald’s can buy frozen lobster cheaply, called the McLobster Roll.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 19, 2015 at 6:33 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Save that leftover Bread….

 
Save all kinds of leftover bread, bagels, baguettes, sandwich loaves, rolls, crackers, biscuits, and buzz to very fine crumbs in the food processor. Freeze in self-sealing plastic bags and use for stuffing and toppings.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 11, 2014 at 6:37 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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Thank you to Abbey for passing this hint along!

 

To thaw frozen bread and rolls, place in a brown paper bag and put into a 325 degree F oven for 5 minutes to thaw completely.

One of America’s Favorites – Lobster Rolls

August 4, 2014 at 8:29 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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A lobster roll from "The Lobster Claw" in Bar Harbor, Maine

A lobster roll from “The Lobster Claw” in Bar Harbor, Maine

A traditional lobster roll is a sandwich filled with lobster meat soaked in butter and served on a steamed hot dog bun or similar roll, so that the opening is on the top rather than on the side. There are variations of this sandwich made in other parts of New England, which may contain diced celery or scallion, and mayonnaise. The sandwich may also contain lettuce, lemon juice, salt and black pepper. Traditional New England restaurants serve lobster rolls (made with butter, not mayonnaise) with potato chips or french fries on the side.The lobster roll was first originated at a restaurant named Perry’s, in Milford, Connecticut as early as 1929, according to John Mariani’s, “Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink.” Once Perry’s put the new sandwich on its menu, its popularity spread up and down the Connecticut coast, but not far beyond. For those residing in Connecticut, a lobster roll served warm is simply called a “lobster roll” while the lobster roll served cold as it is throughout the rest of the northeast region and the world is called a “lobster salad roll” . The lobster salad roll took off on the Eastern End of Long Island, New York, starting in 1965, pioneered by the Lobster Roll Restaurant The Lobster Roll.

 

 

As far back as 1970, chopped lobster meat heated in drawn butter was served on a hot dog bun at road side stands such as Red’s Eats in Maine, Lobster rolls in the U.S. are associated with the state of Maine, but are also commonly available at seafood restaurants in the other New England states and on Eastern Long Island, where lobster fishing is common. They tend to be virtually unheard-of in landlocked regions (such as the Upper Midwest), where fresh lobster is more expensive and more difficult to obtain.

 

A lobster roll from "The Lobster Roll" in Amagansett, New York

A lobster roll from “The Lobster Roll” in Amagansett, New York

Lobster rolls prepared in Maine generally have several common characteristics: first, the roll itself is a “New England” or “Frankfurter” roll that is baked slightly differently from a standard hot dog roll, so the sides are flat and can be buttered on the outside and lightly grilled or toasted, and is split on the top instead of the side; second, the lobster meat in the roll is usually served cold, rather than warm or hot; third, there can be a very light spread of mayonnaise inside the bun or tossed with the meat before filling the roll, though usually do not have any other ingredients typical of the “lobster salad” variation in other parts of New England. The lobster meat is usually knuckle, claw, and tail meat chunks, with 4oz of meat (“1/4 pound”) the common advertised serving size.

 

 

They are a staple summer meal throughout the Maritime provinces in Canada, particularly Nova Scotia where they may also appear on hamburger buns, baguettes, or other types of bread rolls — even pita pockets. The traditional sides are potato chips and dill pickles.

 

 

Some McDonald’s restaurants in New England and the Canadian Maritimes offer lobster rolls as a seasonal menu item when McDonald’s can buy frozen lobster cheaply, called the McLobster Roll.

 

One of America’s Favorites – French Dip

April 28, 2014 at 7:11 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A French dip

A French dip

 

In American cuisine a French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip, is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats) on a “French roll” or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Beef broth or beef consommé is sometimes substituted. Despite the name, this American specialty is almost completely unknown in France, the name seeming to refer to the style of bread rather than an alleged French origin.

 

 

Although the sandwich is most commonly served with a cup of jus or broth on the side of the plate, into which the sandwich is dipped as it is eaten, this is not how the sandwich was served when it was invented.

 

 

Two Los Angeles restaurants have claimed to be the birthplace of the French dip sandwich: Cole’s Pacific Electric Buffet and Philippe The Original. Philippe’s website describes the dish as a “specialty of the house”, and the words “Home Of The Original French Dip Sandwich” are present in the restaurant’s logo. At both of these restaurants, the roll is dipped in the hot beef juices before the sandwich is assembled, and is served “wet”. The sandwich can also be requested “double dipped” at either establishment. Philippe’s own brand of spicy mustard is traditionally used by patrons to complement the sandwich.

 

 

This controversy over who originated the sandwich remains unresolved. Both restaurants were established in 1908. However, Cole’s claims to have originated the sandwich shortly after the restaurant opened in 1908, while Philippe’s claims that owner Philippe Mathieu invented it in 1918. Cole’s was the oldest restaurant or bar in Los Angeles to operate continuously since its opening at the same location. Its streak ended when it closed for remodeling on March 15, 2007. It reopened on December 4, 2008.

 

French dip, with bowl of jus for dipping

French dip, with bowl of jus for dipping

The story of the sandwich’s invention by Philippe’s has several variants: some sources say that the sandwich was first created by a cook or a server who, while preparing a sandwich for a police officer or fireman, accidentally dropped it into a pan of meat drippings. The patron liked it, and the dish surged in popularity shortly after its invention. Other accounts say that a customer who didn’t want some meat drippings to go to waste requested his sandwich be dipped in them. Still others say that a chef dipped a sandwich into a pan of meat drippings after a customer complained that the bread was stale. Cole’s account states that the sandwich was invented by a sympathetic chef, Jack Garlinghouse, for a customer who was complaining of sore gums. Some accounts tell Philippe’s version of events, but assign the location to Cole’s. The mystery of the sandwich’s invention might not be solved due to a lack of information and observable evidence.

 

 

The French dip is now served at a number of restaurant chains including fast food, diners and standard restaurants.

 

 

 

French Dip Sandwich Recipe
Ingredients:

1 (4-pound) beef rib eye, sirloin, or tenderloin roast
1/2 cup coarsely-ground black pepper
Dipping Sauce (recipe follows)
8 French rolls
Butter

 
Preparation:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Place beef roast onto a rack in a shallow baking pan; firmly press pepper onto roast. Bake, uncovered, 30 to 45 minutes or until thermometer in the thickest part of roast registers 135 degrees F. Remove from oven and transfer onto a cutting board; let stand 15 minute before carving; slice beef thinly.

Reserve juice and pour into a medium saucepan. Prepare Dipping Sauce.

For each sandwich: Cut French rolls in half. Toast and butter each French roll. Layer about 1/2 pound of sliced beef on bottom slice of each roll; place remaining tops of rolls on top of the beef. Slice sandwiches in half and serve on individual plates with a small bowl (1/4 cup) of hot Dipping Sauce.

Makes 8 sandwiches.

 

Dipping Sauce:
Drippings from cooking pan
1 (10.5 ounce) can beef broth
1/2 cup water
Salt and pepper to taste

In a medium saucepan, add beef drippings, beef broth, water, salt and pepper; bring just to a boil. turn off heat, cover, and let site 10 minutes before serving.

 

http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/Sandwiches/FrenchDipSandwich.htm

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