SNOWY VANILLA PECAN CRESCENTS

December 3, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I have a recipe for SNOWY VANILLA PECAN CRESCENTS to pass along. To make these you’ll be needing Powdered Sugar, Reduced Fat Margarine, Salt, Vanilla Extract, All Purpose Flour, Rolled Oats, and Chopped Pecans. The Crescents are 75 calories and 9 carbs per serving. You can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

SNOWY VANILLA PECAN CRESCENTS
The generosity and sweetness of pueblo foods at Christmastime is embodied in this recipe.

Ingredients

1 cup powdered sugar, divided
2 sticks fat-reduced margarine, suitable for baking (must have 60-70% fat), such as Imperial or Fleischmann’s
1/4 tsp salt (optional)
2 tsp vanilla extract
1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1-1/4 cups rolled oats
1/2 cup pecans, finely chopped

Directions

1 – Preheat oven to 325F. In a large bowl, cream half of the sugar into the margarine, then add the salt and vanilla extract, blending well. Next add the flour, oats, and nuts, and blend thoroughly.
2 – Place dough by the Tablespoonful on ungreased cookie sheet. Shape into crescents. Bake for 15 minutes or until bottoms are light honey-golden. Remove to wire rack and sift remaining powdered sugar generously over warm crescents.
NOTES:
The generosity and sweetness of pueblo foods at Christmastime is embodied in this recipe.

Recipe Yield: Servings: 36 Cookies

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 75
Fat: 4 grams
Sodium: 50 milligrams
Carbohydrates: 9 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipe/snowy-vanilla-pecan-crescents

Diabetic Dish of the Week – Buttermilk Oat Pancakes

April 28, 2015 at 5:11 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

It’s tough to beat piping hot pancakes fresh off the griddle to start your day! So for the Diabetic Dish of the Week, Buttermilk Oat Pancakes. Start your mornings off healthy, Enjoy!

 

Buttermilk Oat Pancakes

Ingredients

1 1/4 cups regular rolled oats
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 slightly beaten egg whites
2 1/4 cups buttermilk
2 tablespoons cooking oil
2 tablespoons honey (optional)
1 teaspoon vanilla
Nonstick spray coating
Light pancake syrup and waffle syrup product(optional)

 

Directions

1 – In a large bowl combine the oats, all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, baking powder, and salt. Make a well in the center of mixture; set aside.
2 – In a medium bowl combine the egg whites, buttermilk, oil, honey (if desired), and vanilla. Add egg white mixture all at once to flour mixture. Stir just until moistened (batter should be lumpy). Cover batter; allow to stand at room temperature for 15 to 3 minutes.
3 – Coat an unheated griddle or heavy nonstick skillet with nonstick cooking spray. Preheat over medium-high heat. For each pancake, pour about 1/4 cup of the batter onto the hot griddle or skillet. Spread batter into a circle about 4 inches in diameter. Cook over medium heat about 2 minutes on each side or until the pancakes are golden, turning to cook second sides when pancakes have bubbly surfaces and edges are slightly dry. If desired, serve pancakes with syrup.

 

Makes 8 servings (16 pancakes).

Servings Per Recipe: 8
PER SERVING: 237 cal., 6 g total fat (1 g sat. fat), 3 mg chol., 257 mg sodium, 36 g carb., 4 g fiber, 10 g pro.

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Fall Granola

November 10, 2014 at 6:25 AM | Posted in Meatless Monday, PBS, vegetables | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is Fall Granola. And it’s another one from one of my favorite “go to” sites, PBS. http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/

 

PBS

Fall Granola

Combine autumn ingredients for a breakfast bowl of Fall granola.

Ingredients
3 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
1/3 cup coconut oil
1/2 cup honey
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
Pinch of cardamom
1 cup walnuts, chopped
1 cup pumpkin seeds, chopped
1 cup freeze-dried apples, broken into pieces
1/2 cup raisins

 
Directions
1 – Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F. In a small saucepan, set over medium heat, add the coconut oil, honey, brown sugar, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg and cardamom; mix until melted and combined.
2 – To a large bowl, add the rolled oats. Next, pour the coconut oil mixture atop the oats and mix until thoroughly coated. Add the walnuts and pumpkin seeds and toss. Transfer the granola to a parchment-lined baking sheet and place in the oven to bake for 15 minutes. At the 15-minute mark, give the granola a stir and bake for an additional 5 to 10 minutes, until lightly golden brown.
3 – Allow to cool completely. When cooled, add the dried apples and raisins and toss once more. Serve with milk of choice or yogurt.

 
http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/fall-granola/

One of America’s Favorites – Granola

August 25, 2014 at 7:32 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,
A bowl of granola

A bowl of granola

Granola is a breakfast food and snack food, popular in the Americas, consisting of rolled oats, nuts, honey, and sometimes puffed rice, that is usually baked until crisp. During the baking process the mixture is stirred to maintain a loose, breakfast cereal-type consistency. Dried fruits, such as raisins and dates, are sometimes added.

 

Besides serving as food for breakfast and/or snacks, granola is also often eaten by those who are hiking, camping, or backpacking because it is lightweight, high in calories, and easy to store; these properties make it similar to trail mix and muesli. It is often combined into a bar form. Granola is often eaten in combination with yogurt, honey, strawberries, bananas, milk, blueberries and/or other forms of cereal. It can also serve as a topping for various types of pastries and/or desserts. Granola, particularly recipes that include flax seeds, is often used to improve digestion.

 

 
The names Granula and Granola were registered trademarks in the late 19th century United States for foods consisting of whole grain products crumbled and then baked until crisp; in contrast with the sort of contemporary (about 1900) invention, muesli, which is traditionally not baked or sweetened. The name is now a trademark only in Australia and New Zealand, but is commonly referred to as muesli. The trademark is owned by the Australian Health & Nutrition Association Ltd.’s Sanitarium Health Food Company in Australia and Australasian Conference Association Limited in New Zealand.

 

Granula was invented in Dansville, NY, by Dr. Connor Lacey at the Jackson Sanitarium in 1863. The Jackson Sanitarium was a prominent health spa that operated into the early 20th century on the hillside overlooking Dansville. It was also known as Our Home on the Hillside; thus the company formed to sell Jackson’s cereal was known as the Our Home Granula Company. Granula was composed of Graham flour and was similar to an oversized form of Grape-Nuts.

 

In 1951, Willie Pelzer moved from Germany to Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, to work the sugar beet fields. After noticing the lack of variety rolled oats was used for in food, he began experimenting to find a better and more appetizing way of enjoying rolled oats. Ultimately, Pelzer came up with granola and in the 1970s started his own family-owned business by the name of Sunny Crunch Foods Ltd. Working as the CEO and President, Pelzer’s company specialized in granola cereals, granola and protein bars, fibre products, meal replacement products, and health food items. Sunny Crunch Foods Ltd. grew to have worldwide distribution and became one of Canada’s most respected health foods manufacturer. Pelzer is now known as the founder of “crunch granola.”

 

 

 

 

A modern packaged granola cereal

A modern packaged granola cereal

A similar cereal was developed by John Harvey Kellogg. It too was initially known as Granula, but the name was changed to Granola to avoid legal problems with Jackson.

 

The food and name were revived in the 1960s, and fruits and nuts were added to it to make it a health food that was popular with the hippie movement. At the time, several people claim to have revived or re-invented granola. A major promoter was Layton Gentry, profiled in Time as “Johnny Granola-Seed”. In 1964, Gentry sold the rights to a granola recipe using oats, which he claimed to have invented himself, to Sovex Natural Foods for $3,000. The company was founded in 1953 in Holly, Michigan by the Hurlinger family with the main purpose of producing a concentrated paste of brewers yeast and soy sauce known as “Sovex”. Earlier in 1964, it had been bought by John Goodbrad and moved to Collegedale, Tennessee. In 1967, Gentry bought back the rights for west of the Rockies for $1,500 and then sold the west coast rights to Wayne Schlotthauer of Lassen Foods in Chico, California, for $18,000. Lassen was founded from a health food bakery run by Schlotthauer’s father-in-law. The Hurlingers, Goodbrads, and Schlotthauers were all Adventists, and it is possible that Gentry was a lapsed Adventist who was familiar with the earlier granola.

 

In 1972, an executive at Pet Milk (later Pet Incorporated) of St. Louis, Missouri, introduced Heartland Natural Cereal, the first major commercial granola. At almost the same time, Quaker introduced Quaker 100% Natural Granola. Within a year, Kellogg’s had introduced its “Country Morning” granola cereal and General Mills had introduced its “Nature Valley”.

 

In 1974, McKee Baking (later McKee Foods), makers of Little Debbie snack cakes, purchased Sovex. In 1998, the company also acquired the Heartland brand and moved its manufacturing to Collegedale. In 2004, Sovex’s name was changed to “Blue Planet Foods”.

 

 

 

Close-up of a granola bar showing the detail of its pressed shape.

Close-up of a granola bar showing the detail of its pressed shape.

Granola bars are usually identical to the normal form of granola in composition, but differ vastly in shape: Instead of a loose, breakfast cereal consistency, granola bars are pressed and baked into a bar shape, resulting in the production of a more convenient snack. The product is most popular in the United States and Canada, parts of southern Europe, Brazil, Israel, South Africa and Japan. Recently, granola has begun to expand its market into India and other southeast Asian countries.

A variety of the granola bar is the “chewy granola bar.” In this form, the time during which the oats are baked is either shortened or cut out altogether; this gives the bar a texture that is chewier than that of a traditional granola bar. Some manufacturers, such as Kellogg’s, have been shown to prefer usage of the terms “cereal bar” and “snack bar” to refer to them. The difference between a candy bar and a granola or snack bar is largely marketing, rather than any actual difference in nutritional content. The most popular flavors are chocolate, caramel, and fudge.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Oatmeal

April 8, 2013 at 9:56 AM | Posted in cooking | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Oatmeal, also known as white oats is ground oat groats (i.e. oat-meal, cf. cornmeal, peasemeal, etc.), or a porridge made from oats

Rolled oats, a type of oatmeal

Rolled oats, a type of oatmeal

(also called oatmeal cereal or stirabout, in Ireland). Oatmeal can also be ground oat, steel-cut oats, crushed oats, or rolled oats.

The oat grains are de-husked by impact, then heated and cooled to stabilize the “Oat groats”, the seed inside the husk. The process of heating produces a nutty flavour in the oats. These oat groats may be milled to produce fine, medium or coarse oatmeal. Rolled oats are steamed and flattened whole oat groats. Steel cut oats may be small and broken groats from the de-husking process; these may be steamed and flattened to produce smaller rolled oats. Quick-cooking rolled oats (quick oats) are cut into small pieces before being steamed and rolled. Instant oatmeal is pre-cooked and dried, usually with sweetener and flavouring added. Both types of rolled oats may be eaten uncooked as in muesli or may be cooked to make porridge. It is also used as an ingredient in oatmeal cookies and oat cakes, or as an accent, as in the topping on many oat bran breads and the coating on Caboc cheese. Oatmeal is also sometimes porridge with the bran or fibrous husk as well as the oat kernel or groat. In some countries rolled oats are eaten raw with milk and sugar or raisins. Oatmeal is also used as a thickening agent in savoury Arabic/Egyptian thick meat plus vegetable soups.
An oatmeal bath, made by adding a cup of finely ground oatmeal to one’s bathwater, is also commonly used to ease the discomfort associated with such things as chickenpox, poison ivy, eczema, sunburn and dry skin.

There has been increasing interest in oatmeal in recent years because of its health benefits. Daily consumption of a bowl of oatmeal can lower blood cholesterol, because of its soluble fibre content. After it was reported that oats can help lower cholesterol, an “oat bran craze” swept the U.S. in the late 1980s, peaking in 1989. The food craze was short-lived and faded by the early 1990s. The popularity of oatmeal and other oat products increased again after the January 1997 decision by the Food and Drug Administration that food with a lot of oat bran or rolled oats can carry a label claiming it may reduce the risk of heart disease when combined with a low-fat diet. This is because of the beta-glucan in the oats. Rolled oats have long been a staple of many athletes’ diets, especially weight trainers, because of its high content of complex carbohydrates and water-soluble fibre that encourages slow digestion and stabilizes blood-glucose levels. Oatmeal porridge also contains more B vitamins and calories than other kinds of porridges.

Oatmeal has a long history in Scottish culinary tradition because oats are better suited than wheat to Scotland’s short, wet growing

Oatmeal is a prime ingredient of haggis, seen here at a Burns supper

Oatmeal is a prime ingredient of haggis, seen here at a Burns supper

season. Oats became the staple grain of that country. The Ancient universities of Scotland had a holiday called Meal Monday to permit students to return to their farms and collect more oats for food.
Samuel Johnson referred, disparagingly, to this in his dictionary definition for oats: “A grain, which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people.” His biographer, James Boswell, noted that Lord Elibank was said by Sir Walter Scott to have retorted, “Yes, and where else will you see such horses and such men?”
A common method of cooking oatmeal in Scotland is to soak it overnight in salted water and cook on a low heat in the morning for a few minutes until the mixture thickens.
In Scotland, oatmeal is created by grinding oats into a coarse powder. Various grades are available depending on the thoroughness of the grinding, including Coarse, Pin(head) and Fine oatmeal. The main uses are:
* Traditional porridge
* Brose: a thick mixture made with uncooked oatmeal (or medium oatmeal that has been dry toasted by stirring it around in a dry pot over heat until it turns a slightly darker shade and emits a sweet, nutty fragrance) and then adding butter or cream. Brose is eaten like porridge but much more filling.
* Quick-cooking rolled oats(distinct from “instant” variations) are often used for this purpose nowadays, because they are quicker to prepare.
* Gruel, made by mixing oatmeal with cold water that is strained and heated for the benefit of infants and people recovering from illness.
* in the manufacture of bannocks or oatcakes
* as a stuffing for poultry
* as a coating for Caboc cheese
* as the main ingredient of the Scottish dish skirlie, or its chip-shop counterpart, the deep-fried thickly-battered mealy pudding
* mixed with sheep’s blood, salt, and pepper to make Highland black pudding (marag dubh).
* mixed with fat, water, onions and seasoning, and boiled in a sheep’s intestine to make “marag geal”‘ Outer Hebridean white pudding, served sliced with fried eggs at breakfast. A sweeter version with dried fruit is also known.
* as a major component of haggis.
* in sowans, not strictly made from the meal itself but a porridge-like dish made from the fermented inner husks of oats.

In the U.S. state of Vermont, oatmeal making has a long tradition originating with the Scottish settlement of the state. While there are variations, most begin with heavy steel cut oats. The oats are soaked overnight in cold water, salt, and maple syrup. Early the next morning, before beginning farm chores, the cook adds ground nutmeg, ground cinnamon, and sometimes ground ginger. The pot is placed over heat and cooked for 90 minutes or more, and served after the chores with cream, milk, or butter. As most contemporary Vermonters no longer have farm chores, the recipe is simplified to a briefer 10 to 30 minute cooking at a higher heat. Vermont leads the U.S. in per capita consumption of cooked oatmeal cereal.

The havregrynsgröt – porridge made from rolled oats, water and/or milk and often added raisins – is a traditional breakfast staple in Sweden. Porridge made from rye (vattgröt) or barley (bjuggröt) was more common during the Middle Ages.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Traveling In My Kitchen

Exploring the world - one recipe at a time

Hungry Pandas

Dinner, Desserts, and Drinks

Miss Raven's Kitchen

Be creative by flying blind

liz kimchii

Your weekly digest of good eats

Nikole's Kitchen

Live a fulfilling life free of deprivation and full of nourishment.

Peckish Couple

Tasty home-cooked recipes

Missy J White

Food | Motherhood | Lifestyle

Web Bloggers United

We are on a mission to bring together all the favorite bloggers' posts on the web in one place...

Orleans County Cuisine

Let us make beautiful food together