One of America’s Favorites – Roasting

December 9, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Tudor style roasting meat on a spit

Roasting is a cooking method that uses dry heat where hot air covers the food, cooking it evenly on all sides with temperatures of at least 150 °C (300 °F) from an open flame, oven, or other heat source. Roasting can enhance the flavor through caramelization and Maillard browning on the surface of the food. Roasting uses indirect, diffused heat (as in an oven), and is suitable for slower cooking of meat in a larger, whole piece. Meats and most root and bulb vegetables can be roasted. Any piece of meat, especially red meat, that has been cooked in this fashion is called a roast. Meats and vegetables prepared in this way are described as “roasted”, e.g., roasted chicken or roasted squash.

For roasting, the food may be placed on a rack, in a roasting pan or, to ensure even application of heat, may be rotated on a spit or rotisserie. If a pan is used, the juice can be retained for use in gravy, Yorkshire pudding, etc. During oven roasting, hot air circulates around the meat, cooking all sides evenly. There are several plans for roasting meat: low-temperature cooking, high-temperature cooking, and a combination of both. Each method can be suitable, depending on the food and the tastes of the people.

* A low-temperature oven, 95 to 160 °C (200 to 320 °F), is best when cooking with large cuts of meat, turkey and whole chickens. This is not technically roasting temperature, but it is called slow-roasting. The benefit of slow-roasting an item is less moisture loss and a more tender product. More of the collagen that makes meat tough is dissolved in slow cooking. At true roasting temperatures, 200 °C (390 °F) or more, the water inside the muscle is lost at a high rate.

A Sunday roast consisting of roast beef, potatoes, vegetables……..

* Cooking at high temperatures is beneficial if the cut is tender enough—as in fillet Mignon or strip loin—to be finished cooking before the juices escape. A reason for high temperature roasting is to brown the outside of the food, similar to browning food in a pan before pot roasting or stewing it. Fast cooking gives more variety of flavor, because the outside is brown while the center is much less done.
* The combination method uses high heat just at either the beginning or the end of the cooking process, with most of the cooking at a low temperature. This method produces the golden-brown texture and crust, but maintains more of the moisture than simply cooking at a high temperature, although the product will not be as moist as low-temperature cooking the whole time. Searing and then turning down to low is also beneficial when a dark crust and caramelized flavor is desired for the finished product.
In general, in either case, the meat is removed from the heat before it has finished cooking and left to sit for a few minutes, while the inside cooks further from the residual heat content, known as carry over cooking.

The objective in any case is to retain as much moisture as possible, while providing the texture and color. As meat cooks, the structure and especially the collagen breaks down, allowing juice to come out of the meat. So meat is juiciest at about medium rare while the juice is coming out. During roasting, meats and vegetables are frequently basted on the surface with butter, lard, or oil to reduce the loss of moisture by evaporation. In recent times, plastic oven bags have become popular for roasts. These cut cooking times and reduce the loss of moisture during roasting, but reduce flavor development from Maillard browning, somewhat more like (boiled or steamed) stew or pot roast. They are particularly popular for turkeys.

Until the late 19th century, roasting by dry heat in an oven was called baking. Roasting originally meant turning meat or a bird on a spit in front of a fire. It is one of the oldest forms of cooking known.

Whole roast chicken

Traditionally recognized roasting methods consist only of baking and cooking over or near an open fire. Grilling is normally not technically a roast, since a grill (gridiron) is used. Barbecuing and smoking differ from roasting because of the lower temperature and controlled smoke application. Grilling can be considered as a low-fat food preparation, as it allows any fat in the food to drip away.

Before the invention and widespread use of stoves, food was primarily cooked over open flames from a hearth. To roast meat, racks with skewers, or, if accessible, complicated gear arrangements, would be utilized to turn the piece(s). In the past, this method was often associated with the upper class and special occasions, rather than customary mealtimes, because it required freshly killed meat and close attention during cooking. It was easy to ruin the meat’s taste with a smoky fire or negligence to rotate it at regular intervals. Thus, elite families, who were able to afford quality meat, appointed this task to servants or invested in technology like automatic turning devices. With further technological advances, cooking came to accommodate new opportunities. By the 1860s, working families were able to afford low-priced stove models that became sufficiently available. However, the key element of observation during roasting became difficult and dangerous to do with the coal oven. Hence, traditional roasting disappeared as kitchens became no longer equipped for this custom and soon thereafter, “baking” came to be “roasting”.

Roasting can be applied to a wide variety of meat. In general, it works best for cooking whole chickens, turkey, and leaner cuts of lamb, pork, and beef. The aim is to highlight the flavor of the meat itself rather than a sauce or stew, as it is done in braising or other moist-heat methods. Many roasts are tied with string prior to roasting, often using the reef knot or the packer’s knot. Tying holds them together during roasting, keeping any stuffing inside, and keeps the roast in a round profile, which promotes even cooking.

Red meats such as beef, lamb, and venison, and certain game birds are often roasted to be “pink” or “rare”, meaning that the center of the roast is still red. Roasting is a preferred method of cooking for most poultry, and certain cuts of beef, pork, or lamb. Although there is a growing fashion in some restaurants to serve “rose pork”, temperature monitoring of the center of the roast is the only sure way to avoid foodborne disease.

In Britain, Ireland, and Australia, a roast of meat may be referred to as a joint, or a leg, if it is a leg.

Some vegetables, such as potatoes, zucchini, pumpkin, turnips, rutabagas, parsnips, cauliflower, asparagus, squash, and peppers, yam and plantain lend themselves to roasting as well. Roasted chestnuts are also a popular snack in winter.

It is also possible to roast fish as meat.

 

Pan-Roasted Chicken with Cauliflower w/ Roasted Red Potatoes with Rosemary

December 2, 2013 at 6:22 PM | Posted in chicken, potatoes, vegetables | 4 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Pan-Roasted Chicken with Cauliflower w/ Roasted Red Potatoes with Rosemary

 

Roasted Chicken and Cauliflower 005

 

Had a 9:00 am Doctor appointment, checking up on sugar, cholesterol, and such. Get the results end of the week, hopeful everything okay! From there to Kroger to pick a few items needed for dinner tonight. Warmer again today, mid 40’s with 50 or 60 coming the next couple of days. But then a huge cold front coming in after that. Enjoy it while it’s here I guess. For dinner a couple of new ones tonight, Pan-Roasted Chicken with Cauliflower w/ Roasted Red Potatoes with Rosemary.

 

 

 

Came across the Pan-Roasted Chicken with Cauliflower in Mom’s issue of Rachael Ray Every Day Magazine and the recipe looked and sounded too good to pass up! I ve left the full recipes and web links to all the recipes at the end of the post.

 

 

Roasted Chicken and Cauliflower 004

For the Chicken recipe called for 1 whole chicken (3 1/2 lbs.), quartered. But I was just making it for myself so instead I used Miller’s Amish Skinless Chicken Breasts w/ Rib Meat. It came with 2 nice size breasts and they were skinless so that will save on calories. To prepare the Pan-Roasted Chicken with Cauliflower I needed 2 tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 1 lemon, thinly sliced, 3 rosemary sprigs, 4 cloves garlic, halved, 1 head cauliflower, cut into florets, and 3 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley.
To Prepare it start by preheating the oven to 450 degrees . In a cast iron skillet, heat 1 tbsp. EVOO over medium-high. Season the chicken with sea salt and pepper and cook until golden-brown, about 7-8 minutes. Turn chicken, scatter with the lemon slices, rosemary sprigs and garlic, and roast until cooked through, about 25 minutes.

 
Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the remaining 1 tbsp. EVOO over medium-high. Cook the cauliflower, stirring occasionally, until browned in spots, about 5 minutes. Add 3/4 cup water, partially cover and cook until just tender, 10 minutes. Season.
Transfer the cauliflower to a platter and add the chicken and lemon slices. Discard the rosemary. Mash the garlic into the pan juices. Top the chicken with the pan sauce and sprinkle with parsley. I also sprinkled fresh Grated Parmesan Cheese on the Cauliflower when it was done. And what a dish! The Chicken and Cauliflower go fantastic together. The Chicken came out moist and tender and the Cauliflower was very tender and with added Parm Cheese was spot on!

 

 
I also made some Roasted Red Potatoes with Rosemary. Love those potatoes and love this recipe also! A real simple one to prepare. You’ll need 6 to 8 small red potatoes, quartered into 1/2-inch pieces, 1 tablespoon Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary leaves, 1/2 teaspoon sea salt, and 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper. To prepare it preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Then combine all ingredients in a large bowl and toss to coat potatoes. Transfer potatoes to a large baking sheet or shallow roasting pan. Roast 25 to 30 minutes, until tender and golden. Done, and we have Potatoes! Delicious comfort food dinner tonight! For dessert later a Helthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 

 
Pan-Roasted Chicken with Cauliflower

 

ingredients
2 tablespoons EVOO
1 whole chicken (3 1/2 lbs.), quartered
1 lemon, thinly sliced
3 rosemary sprigs
4 cloves garlic, halved
1 head cauliflower, cut into florets
3 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley
directions
Preheat the oven to 450 degrees . In a large ovenproof skillet, heat 1 tbsp. EVOO over medium-high. Season the chicken with salt and pepper and cook, skin side down, until golden-brown, about 7 minutes. Turn chicken, scatter with the lemon slices, rosemary sprigs and garlic, and roast until cooked through, about 25 minutes.
Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the remaining 1 tbsp. EVOO over medium-high. Cook the cauliflower, stirring occasionally, until browned in spots, about 5 minutes. Add 3/4 cup water, partially cover and cook until just tender, 10 minutes. Season.
Transfer the cauliflower to a platter and add the chicken and lemon slices. Discard the rosemary. Mash the garlic into the pan juices. Top the chicken with the pan sauce and sprinkle with parsley.

Tip
An Extra Buck Will Buy You…Grated Parmesan
Add a nutty note by sprinkling cheese over the cauliflower just before serving.
Recipe by Janet Taylor McCracken

 
http://www.rachaelraymag.com/recipe/pan-roasted-chicken-with-cauliflower/

 

 

 
Roasted Red Potatoes with Rosemary

Ingredients
6 to 8 small red potatoes, quartered into 1/2-inch pieces
1 tablespoon olive oil or garlic-flavored olive oil
1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary leaves
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and toss to coat potatoes. Transfer potatoes to a large baking sheet or shallow roasting pan. Roast 25 to 30 minutes, until tender and golden.

 

 

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/robin-miller/roasted-red-potatoes-with-rosemary-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

Whole Seasoned Roaster Chicken w/ Potato Pancakes, Cut Green Beans, and…

October 25, 2013 at 5:27 PM | Posted in chicken, greenbeans, Perdue Chicken Products, potatoes | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Whole Seasoned Roaster Chicken w/ Potato Pancakes, Cut Green Beans, and Baked Harvest Grain Bread

Perdue Oven Ready Whole Roaster 002

 
Beautiful but crisp and sunny Autumn Day, started out at 28 degrees this morning. Ran a couple of errands and went to Kroger for a couple of items. i needed some Sugarless Peach Preserves for a recipe that I had planned on having to night. I found the Peach Preserves, though not Sugarless will still work. But also while there they had some of the Perdue Oven Ready Whole Seasoned Roaster Chickens in stock and couldn’t pass up grabbing one. So dinner went from a Pork Tenderloin Roast to a Perdue Oven Ready Whole Seasoned Roaster Chicken. For dinner I prepared a Perdue Oven Ready Whole Seasoned Roaster Chicken w/ Potato Pancakes, Cut Green Beans, and Baked Harvest Grain Bread.

 

 

Perdue Oven Ready Whole Roaster 001
I had tried the Perdue Oven Ready Whole Seasoned Roaster Chicken once before, it’s tough finding these though. Kroger is the only one that I have found that carries them, and there’s only one Kroger at that has them from time to time. These are great, a real easy way to prepare a Whole Roasted Chicken. To prepare it preheat the oven to 400ºF. Cut open the outer bag and remove roaster, sealed in cooking bag. Place it in a shallow roasting pan, breast side up.Cut open outer bag and remove roaster, sealed in cooking bag. Place it in a shallow roasting pan, breast side up. Cut one small 1″ slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. Place pan with roaster (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 90-115 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF. Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes. Cut open cooking bag (use care to avoid hot steam and juices) and transfer roaster to serving plate or cutting board. Remove string from legs before carving. Remaining juices in bag can be used for a delicious seasoned gravy. The full instructions are at the end of the post. It can’t get much easier! Little mess to clean up and one mouth – watering delicious Roasted Chicken! Tender, moist, well seasoned, and browns up perfect. Huge Chicken (see the picture), plenty of great leftovers for lunch also!

 

 
For sides I heated up a can of Walmart Brand Cut Green Beans, a bit cheaper price wise than Del Monte and same taste. Also I had some of the Manischewitz Potato Pancake Mix leftover from the other night so I prepared some more of the Potato Pancakes. Then, while at Kroger this morning, I picked up a Petite Loaf of Kroger Private Selection Harvest Grain Bread that I baked. Another good choice meal for a cool Autumn Day! For dessert later a Healthy Choice Vanilla Bean Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 

Perdue Oven Ready Whole Seasoned Roaster

 
PERDUE® OVEN READY Whole Seasoned Roaster
No prep work
Deliciously seasoned
Cooks perfectly in bag
Easy clean-up
6-8 servings
INGREDIENTS
*Ingredients: Chicken, water, salt, potassium and sodium phosphates, brown sugar, dextrose, carrageenan, yeast extract, maltodextrin, natural flavor.

*Seasoning Ingredients: Dextrose, modified food starch, onion, maltodextrin, natural flavor, garlic, cottonseed oil, dried carrot, xanthan gum, dried parsley, calcium chloride, potassium chloride, carrageenan

FEATURES & BENEFITS
Perfectly seasoned, juicy and convenient. Perdue’s Oven Ready Roaster cooking bag saves time on traditional roasting and makes cleanup a snap.
PRODUCT HANDLING
Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave. Cook thoroughly. If breast temperature is below 180ºF, return to oven and continue cooking, checking the temperature every 10 minutes until the temperature reaches 180ºF.
COOKING AND PREP
• Preheat oven to 400ºF. Cut open outer bag and remove roaster, sealed in cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, breast side up.Cut open outer bag and remove roaster, sealed in cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, breast side up.
• Cut one small 1″ slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. Note: Cooking bag will expand during cooking; allow enough room for the bag to expand without touching oven rack or walls.
• To Cook from Fresh (Preferred): Place pan with roaster (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 90-115 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.
• To Cook from Frozen: Place pan with roaster (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 2 3/4 – 3 hours until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.
• Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes. Cut open cooking bag (use care to avoid hot steam and juices) and transfer roaster to serving plate or cutting board. Remove string from legs before carving. Remaining juices in bag can be used for a delicious seasoned gravy.

 

 
Nutrition:
Serving Size 4oz (112g)
Servings Per Container about 20
Amount Per Serving (* % of Daily Value)
Calories 210
Calories from Fat 140
Total Fat 15g (23%)
Saturated Fat 4.5g (23%)
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 70mg (23%)
Sodium 360mg (15%)
Total Carbohydrate 0g (0%)
Dietary Fiber 0g (0%)
Sugars 0g
Protein 16g

 

http://www.perdue.com/products/details.asp?id=447&title=PERDUE%AE%20OVEN%20READY%20Whole%20Seasoned%20Roaster%20(6%20lbs.)

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