Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 27, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Leftover Turkey……………

Cooked turkey is safe in the fridge for up to three to four days, so you can get creative with some recipes over the next few days. Remember, if you’re heating up the leftover turkey, ensure it is piping hot throughout. Do not reheat meat more than once.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 25, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Make sure your Bird is done…………………..

If your turkey has a “pop-up” temperature indicator, it is recommended that you also check the internal temperature of the turkey in the innermost part of the thigh and wing and the thickest part of the breast with a food thermometer. Cook your turkey until your thermometer reads 155 -160 degrees. Yes, we know that new safe cooking guidelines say to cook your bird to 165 degrees, but remember that your turkey will continue to cook after removed from the oven and it’s temperature will increase by 10 degrees while resting. Enjoy that Turkey!

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 17, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Stop, don’t rinse the Turkey………………

Food experts say don’t — repeat don’t — wash the turkey before popping it in the oven on Thanksgiving Day. They say that could spread the germs lurking on your turkey in the kitchen sink or nearby food. But it’s been a challenge trying to convince cooks to stop rinsing off raw poultry.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 14, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Stay Away from Big Bird………………….

 

If you’re having lots of people over, it might seem counter-productive to get two smaller turkeys instead of just one huge one. But birds over 18-20 pounds are much more likely to have been treated with chemicals. Plus, massive birds also take quite a bit longer to thaw and cook and tend to cook less evenly.
https://www.tasteofhome.com/collection/holiday-tips/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 21, 2018 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Rest and Relax……….

To lock in juices, tent your turkey with foil and let it rest for at least 15 to 20 minutes before carving. Be sure you don’t cover the turkey too tightly as you don’t want the bird to steam under the foil.

One of America’s Favorites – Turkey

November 19, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Turkey meat, commonly referred to as just turkey, is the meat from turkeys, typically domesticated turkeys. It is a popular poultry product, especially in North America where it is traditionally

A roast turkey prepared for a traditional U.S. Thanksgiving meal.

consumed as part of culturally significant events such as Thanksgiving and Christmas as well as in standard cuisine.

Turkeys are sold sliced and ground, as well as “whole” in a manner similar to chicken with the head, feet, and feathers removed. Frozen whole turkeys remain popular. Sliced turkey is frequently used as a sandwich meat or served as cold cuts; in some cases where recipes call for chicken it can be used as a substitute. Ground turkey is sold, and frequently marketed as a healthy alternative to ground beef. Without careful preparation, cooked turkey is usually considered to end up less moist than other poultry meats such as chicken or duck.

Wild turkeys, while technically the same species as domesticated turkeys, have a very different taste from farm-raised turkeys. Almost all of the meat is “dark” (including the breast) with a more intense flavor. The flavor can also vary seasonally with changes in available forage, often leaving wild turkey meat with a gamier flavor in late summer, due to the greater number of insects in its diet over the preceding months. Wild turkey that has fed predominantly on grass and grain has a milder flavor. Older heritage breeds also differ in flavor.

A large amount of turkey meat is processed. It can be smoked and as such is sometimes sold as turkey ham or turkey bacon, which is widely considered to be far healthier than pork-based bacon. Twisted helices of deep-fried turkey meat, sold as “turkey twizzlers”, came to prominence in the UK in 2004 when chef Jamie Oliver campaigned to have them and similar foods removed from school dinners.

Unlike chicken eggs, turkey eggs are not commonly sold as food due to the high demand for whole turkeys and lower output of eggs as compared with other fowl (not only chickens, but even ducks or quail). The value of a single turkey egg is estimated to be about $3.50 on the open market, substantially more than an entire carton of one dozen chicken eggs.

Turkeys are traditionally eaten as the main course of Thanksgiving dinner in the United States and Canada, and at Christmas feasts in much of the rest of the world (often as stuffed turkey).

Turkey meat has been eaten by indigenous Peoples from Mexico, Central America and the southern tier of the United States since antiquity. In the 15th century, Spanish Conquistadors took Aztec turkeys back to Europe.

Turkey was eaten as such as early as the 16th century in England. Before the 20th century, pork ribs were the most common food for the North American holidays, as the animals were usually slaughtered in November. Turkeys were once so abundant in the wild that they were eaten throughout the year, the food considered commonplace, whereas pork ribs were rarely available outside of the Thanksgiving-New Year season. While the tradition of turkey at Christmas spread throughout Britain in the 17th century, among the working classes it became common to serve goose, which remained the predominant roast until the Victorian era.

In the UK in 2009, 7,734,000 turkeys were consumed on Christmas Day.

Turkey with mole sauce is regarded as Mexico’s “national dish”.

Both fresh and frozen turkeys are used for cooking; as with most foods, fresh turkeys are generally preferred, although they cost more. Around holiday seasons, high demand for fresh turkeys

Roast turkey

often makes them difficult to purchase without ordering in advance. For the frozen variety, the large size of the turkeys typically used for consumption makes defrosting them a major endeavor: a typically sized turkey will take several days to properly defrost.

Turkeys are usually baked or roasted in an oven for several hours, often while the cook prepares the remainder of the meal. Sometimes, a turkey is brined before roasting to enhance flavor and moisture content. This is done because the dark meat requires a higher temperature to denature all of the myoglobin pigment than the white meat (very low in myoglobin), so that fully cooking the dark meat tends to dry out the breast. Brining makes it possible to fully cook the dark meat without drying the breast meat. Turkeys are sometimes decorated with turkey frills, paper frills or “booties” that are placed on the end of drumsticks or bones of other cutlets.

In some areas, particularly the American South, they may also be deep-fried in hot oil (often peanut oil) for 30 to 45 minutes by using a turkey fryer. Deep frying turkey has become something of a fad, with hazardous consequences for those unprepared to safely handle the large quantities of hot oil required.

For Thanksgiving in the United States, turkey is typically served stuffed or with dressing (on the side), with cranberry sauce and gravy. Common complementary dishes include mashed potatoes,

Roast turkey served with salad, sauces and sparkling juice. On the left is a log cake

corn on the cob, green beans, squash, and sweet potatoes. Pie is the usual dessert, especially those made from pumpkins, apples, or pecans.

When eaten at Christmas in the United Kingdom, turkey is traditionally served with winter vegetables including roast potatoes, Brussels sprouts and parsnips. Cranberry sauce is the traditional condiment in the northern rural areas of the United Kingdom where wild cranberries grow. In the south and in urban areas, where cranberries until recently were difficult to obtain, bread sauce was used in its place, but the availability of commercial cranberry sauce has seen a rise in its popularity in these areas too. Sometimes sausage meat, cocktail sausages or liver wrapped in bacon is also served (known as bacon rolls or “pigs in blankets”).

Especially during holiday seasons, stuffing, also known as dressing, is traditionally served with turkey. There are many varieties: oatmeal, chestnut, sage and onion (flavored bread), cornbread, and sausage are the most traditional. Stuffing may either be used to stuff the turkey (as the name implies), or may be cooked separately and served as a side dish.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 18, 2018 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Hold the Stuffing…………..

Keep the stuffing on the side. Chances are the Thanksgivings of your childhood featured a stuffing cooked right in the cavity of the turkey. Go ahead and use your family recipe, but we suggest you cook the stuffing in a separate pan. Cooking the stuffing in the turkey can provide fertile ground for the growth of harmful bacteria. In addition, a stuffed turkey will take longer to cook, which could result in drier white meat. Instead, loosely fill the turkey with aromatics such as onions and herbs, and cook the stuffing separately. I didn’t know this, but good one to know.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 13, 2018 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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What size Turkey should I buy?………..

Figure on 1 to 1 1/2 pounds of turkey per person. To buy the right size turkey for your party, simply tally up the turkey-eating guests. Add a few pounds on for bones and you’ve got your turkey weight. For example, 8 people will require a 12 to 14-pound turkey. Enjoy that Bird!

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

November 22, 2017 at 6:27 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Hints for the Bird……….

* If you’re using a frozen turkey, whatever you do, don’t wait until the day before Thanksgiving to take it out of the freezer. Remember, frozen turkeys take at least three days to completely thaw.

* Got a big crowd coming over? Roast two smaller turkeys (12 pounds or less) instead of one large one. Smaller turkeys fit better in the fridge and roasting pan, plus they cook more quickly and evenly. Plus, it lets you experiment with two different types of preparations.

* When calculating your roasting time, plan on about 15 minutes per pound.

* Let your bird rest for a few minutes after you take it out of the oven. A good 20 minute nap will let everything settle and keep the moisture where it belongs: in the meat.

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe(s) of the Week – The Juiciest Turkey Ever and Slow Cooker Holiday Ham

December 11, 2015 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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It’s two for the price of one for this week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe(s) of the Week – The Juiciest Turkey Ever and Slow Cooker Holiday Ham. You’ll be using a (8 to 12-pound) JENNIE-O® Premium Fresh Young Turkey and a (10-pound) HORMEL® CURE81® Spiral Sliced Cherrywood Ssmoked Ham. Have the best of both worlds for your Christmas Dinner! You can find this recipe along with all the sides and desserts that can go with it on the Jennie – O website. http://www.jennieo.com/

 
THE JUICIEST TURKEY EVER
Serve a delicious, anything-but-dry Thanksgiving Turkey, thanks to a savvy, upside-down cooking method.

INGREDIENTS
2 tablespoons light brown sugarThe Juiciest Turkey Ever

1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning

2 teaspoons ground oregano

2 teaspoons dried thyme leaves

2 teaspoons garlic powder

1 (8 to 12-pound) JENNIE-O® Premium Fresh Young Turkey

3 tablespoons butter, softened

DIRECTIONS
1 – In small bowl, combine brown sugar, Cajun seasoning, oregano, thyme and garlic powder. Rub turkey with butter and sprinkle with brown sugar mixture. Place turkey in v-rack, upside down, over roasting pan. Cooking your turkey upside down makes for a juicy, tender turkey.

2 – Cook turkey as specified on the package. Roast until timer pops up and turkey is fully cooked, 180°F as measured by a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh. ALWAYS confirm doneness with a meat thermometer. Juices should run clear. Let turkey stand 20 minutes before carving.

Nutritional InformationJennie O Make the Switch
Calories 90
Protein 113g
Carbohydrates 8g
Fiber 2g
Sugars 4g

 

 
SLOW COOKER HOLIDAY HAM
Throw this Cherrywood Smoked Ham in the slow cooker and forget about it until mealtime.Slow Cooker Holiday Ham

INGREDIENTS
1 (10-pound) HORMEL® CURE81® spiral sliced, cherrywood smoked ham

⅔ cup apple jelly

2 tablespoons cider vinegar

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

¼ teaspoon ground gloves

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

DIRECTIONS
1 – Place ham in slow cooker. Cook on LOW 4 hours.

2 – In small saucepan, bring apple jelly, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, cloves and cinnamon to a boil, whisking constantly until blended. Serve sauce over ham.

http://www.jennieo.com/holidays-and-events/christmas/menus#m4

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