Healthy Crisp and Crumble Recipes

December 26, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Crisp and Crumble Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Crisp and Crumble Recipes with recipes including; Apple-Crisp-Stuffed Baked Apples, Peach-Raspberry Crisp, and Old-Fashioned Apple-Nut Crisp. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Crisp and Crumble Recipes
Find healthy, delicious crisp and crumble recipes including apple, rhubarb and strawberry rhubarb crisps. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Apple-Crisp-Stuffed Baked Apples
This apple dessert marries the best parts of apple crisp with a baked apple to make an adorable and tasty sweet treat. Cooking an apple crisp inside an apple is a wonderful treat in summer with a scoop of ice cream, or in fall after an apple-picking trip…………….

Peach-Raspberry Crisp
A fruit crisp offers the luscious flavor of a fresh fruit pie without the fuss of making a crust. Celebrate the arrival of late-summer peaches with this rich-tasting crisp. The nut-studded topping works great with other fruit combinations too……………

Old-Fashioned Apple-Nut Crisp
Apples and nuts are a classic–and healthful–combination, especially when you cut back on the saturated fat that typically tops this sweet treat. Our version is just as delicious, and allows the flavor of the hazelnuts to shine through. A dollop of Vanilla Cream or scoop of vanilla frozen yogurt finishes this homey dessert beautifully……………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Crisp and Crumble Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18284/desserts/cobblers/crisps-crumbles/

Healthy Spring Dessert Recipes

May 4, 2016 at 5:15 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website – Healthy Spring Dessert Recipes. Recipes including; Meringue-Topped Strawberries & Rhubarb, Peach, Rhubarb & Ginger Crisp, and Strawberry Pandowdy. Find themall along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes at the EatingWell website. http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 

Healthy Spring Dessert Recipes
Delicious dessert recipes to celebrate spring.EatingWell2
Celebrate the sweet flavors of spring with our healthy dessert recipes that are full of fresh fruit. We’ve lightened up traditional spring desserts, such as pies, crisps, cobblers, strudels and more, so you can end your meal on a high note with a sweet and satisfying dessert. Try Strawberry-Rhubarb Strudel to enjoy spring’s best combo or Peach, Rhubarb & Ginger Crisp for a lighter version of this classic fruit dessert.

 

 

Meringue-Topped Strawberries & Rhubarb
Poaching brings out the flavorful strawberry and rhubarb juices with minimal effort. An airy meringue on top of the poached fruit is a healthy (and gorgeous) stand-in for a heavier whipped-cream or ice cream topping……

 
Peach, Rhubarb & Ginger Crisp
In this fruit crisp, the crunchy oatmeal topping and the peach-rhubarb filling get a lively kick from finely chopped crystallized ginger. (If you’re not a ginger fan just leave it out.) The fruit filling is sweetened to match the peach-rhubarb combination—if you use other fruit that is very ripe and/or sweet, reduce the sugar in the filling to 3 tablespoons. The topping can be made ahead, so consider making a double batch and storing half in the freezer to have on hand for a quick dessert……

 
Strawberry Pandowdy
A truly old-fashioned dessert, “pandowdy” is said to refer to the cutting up of the flaky crust, or “dowdy-ing,” toward the end of the baking time. Once the crust is cut, the bubbly fruit cooks up around the crust. This dessert is good with whichever berries are ripe at the moment. In early summer go for strawberries. Serve with ice cream or frozen yogurt…..

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Spring Dessert Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_spring_dessert_recipes

Spring Salads to Help You Slim Down

April 2, 2015 at 5:33 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Here’s some fantastic recipes for Spring Salads to Help You Slim Down. From the EatingWell website, Enjoy! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 

EatingWell2

Spring Salads to Help You Slim Down

Get recipes for healthy spring salads, featuring leafy greens and more fresh spring vegetables.
For a healthy side dish to round out your meal or a light main course meal, try one of our healthy, low-calorie spring salad recipes. Featuring leafy greens and more fresh spring vegetables, our spring salad recipes to help you slim down are the perfect complement to many meals. Try our Roasted Rhubarb Salad or Radish, Celery & Snap Pea Salad for a healthy salad recipes bursting with the fresh flavors of spring.

 

 
Roasted Rhubarb Salad
Rhubarb roasted for just a few minutes is a tart topping for a mixed green salad with raisins, walnuts and goat cheese……

 

 

Radish, Celery & Snap Pea Salad

This stunning spring salad, full of peppery radishes, sliced celery, celery leaves and crunchy snap peas, is perfect for entertaining. If you grow your own celery, you’ll have plenty of leaves to work with. But we found that most store-bought celery yielded enough leaves for this recipe if you combine the dark outer leaves with the pale yellow inner leaves at the heart. If you can’t collect enough celery leaves, make up the difference with extra parsley. The results will still be delicious……

 

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Spring Salads to Help You Slim Down

 

 

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/spring_salads_to_help_you_slim_down

Diabetic Friendly Rhubarb Walnut Muffins

March 19, 2012 at 2:17 PM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, nuts | Leave a comment
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Diabetic Friendly Rhubarb Walnut Muffins

Ingredients

1/2 c whole wheat flour
2 tbsp Splenda Sugar Blend for baking
1tbsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1c finely chopped fresh or frozen rhubarb
1/4 c chopped walnuts
1/2 c fluid skim (nonfat) milk
1/4 c egg substitute
2 tbsp canola oil

Directions
Preheat Oven to 350 F.
Stir together flour, sugar, bakink powder, and cinnamon. Add rhubarb and nuts. In another bowl, combine milk, egg, and oil. Pour milk mixture into rhubarb and dry ingredients mixture. Mix just until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon batter into prepared muffin cups or an oiled/sprayed muffin tin. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes
Tip: Fill empty muffin tins with water in order for muffins to cook evenly.

Number of Servings: 8

Nutritional Info

Servings Per Recipe: 8
Amount Per Serving
Calories: 94.4

Total Fat: 6.1 g
Cholesterol: 0.4 mg
Sodium: 205.9 mg
Total Carbs: 8.5 g
Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g
Protein: 3.0 g

Fruit of the Week – Rhubarb

July 13, 2011 at 10:36 AM | Posted in baking, diabetes, diabetes friendly, fruits | 2 Comments
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I never thought of Rhubarb as a fruit but here’s the story!

Rhubarb is a group of plants that belong to the genus Rheum in the family Polygonaceae. They are herbaceous perennial plants growing from short, thick rhizomes. They have large leaves that are somewhat triangular-shaped with long fleshy petioles. They have small flowers grouped in large compound leafy greenish-white to rose-red inflorescences.

Although the leaves are toxic, various parts of the plants have medicinal and culinary uses. The traditional Chinese pharmacopeia features rhubarb. In culinary use, fresh raw stalks are crisp (similar to celery) with a strong tart taste; most commonly the plant’s stalks are cooked and used in pies and other foods for their tart flavour. A number of varieties have been domesticated for human consumption, most of which are recognised as Rheum x hybridum by the Royal Horticultural Society.

Rhubarb is usually considered to be a vegetable; however, in the United States, a New York court decided in 1947 that since it was used in the United States as a fruit it was to be counted as a fruit for the purposes of regulations and duties. A side effect was a reduction in taxes paid.

Rhubarb is now grown in many areas and thanks to greenhouse production is available throughout much of the year. Rhubarb grown in hothouses (heated greenhouses) is called hothouse rhubarb and is typically made available at consumer markets in early spring, before outdoor cultivated rhubarb is available. Hothouse rhubarb is usually brighter red, more tender and sweeter-tasting than cultivated rhubarb. In temperate climates, rhubarb is one of the first food plants to be ready for harvest, usually in mid- to late spring (April/May in the northern hemisphere, October/November in the southern hemisphere), and the season for field-grown plants lasts until September. In the northwestern US states of Oregon and Washington, there are typically two harvests: one from late April to May and another from late June into July. Rhubarb is ready to be consumed as soon as it is harvested, and freshly cut stalks will be firm and glossy.

Rhubarb will grow year-round in warm climates, but in temperate climate the above ground portion of the plant completely withers away at the onset of freezing temperature; the plant grows from the root at the return of warm weather. Rhubarb growth can be forced or encouraged to grow early by raising the local temperature, usually by placing an upturned bucket over the new shoots. Because rhubarb is a seasonal plant, obtaining fresh rhubarb out of season is difficult in colder climates, such as in the UK.

Rhubarb can successfully be planted in containers, so long as the container is large enough to accommodate a season’s growth.

The color of the rhubarb stalks can vary from the commonly associated crimson red, through speckled light pink, to simply light green. Rhubarb stalks are poetically described as crimson stalks. The color results from the presence of anthocyanins, and varies according to both rhubarb variety and production technique. The color is not related to its suitability for cooking. The green-stalked rhubarb is more robust and has a higher yield, but the red-colored stalks are much more popular with consumers.

One way is to cut up the stalks into 1 inch (2.5 cm) pieces and stew them (boil in water); it is only necessary to barely cover the stalks with water because rhubarb stalks contain a great deal of water; add 1/2 to 3/4 cup of sugar for each pound of rhubarb, then add cinnamon and/or nutmeg to taste. Sometimes a tablespoon of lime juice or lemon juice is added. The sliced stalks are boiled until soft. An alternative method is to simmer slowly without adding water, letting the rhubarb cook in its own juice.

At this stage, cooked with strawberries or apples as a sweetener, or with stem or root ginger, rhubarb makes excellent jam. Other fruits, with the addition of pectin (or using sugar with pectin already added), can be added to rhubarb at this stage to make a variety of jams: the fruit is added at a ratio of two parts fruit to one part rhubarb, consisting of strawberries, raspberries, or chopped plums, apricots, or apples. Boiling should continue for at least ten minutes after all fruit is completely softened, depending on whether a simple refrigerated jam is made, or if (with longer cooking) jam is to be bottled for a long shelf life.

To make a “sauce” of rhubarb (to which dried fruit could be added near the end), continue simmering 45 minutes to one hour at medium heat, until the sauce is mostly smooth and the remaining discrete stalks can easily be pierced with a fork, which yield a smooth tart-sweet sauce with a flavor similar to sweet and sour sauce. This sauce is called rhubarb sauce, analogous to apple sauce. Another name for it is stewed rhubarb. Like apple sauce, this sauce is usually stored in the refrigerator and eaten cold. The sauce, when stewed over medium heat only a short time (about 20 minutes) and with only a little water so that the rhubarb stalks stay mostly discrete, may be used as filling for pies (see rhubarb pie), tarts, and crumbles. Sometimes stewed strawberries are mixed with the rhubarb to make strawberry-rhubarb pie. This common use has led to the slang term for rhubarb, “pie plant”, by which name it was more commonly known in the United States in the latter nineteenth century. In her novella The First Four Years, American author Laura Ingalls Wilder refers to rhubarb as “pie plant”. It can also be used to make a fruit wine.

In former days, a common and affordable sweet for children in parts of the United Kingdom and Sweden was a tender stick of rhubarb, dipped in sugar. It is still eaten this way in western Norway, Iceland and some other parts of the world, including rural Eastern Ontario.

Diabetic Rhubarb Coffee Cake

July 13, 2011 at 10:33 AM | Posted in baking, dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, fruits, low calorie, low carb | Leave a comment
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Diabetic Rhubarb Coffee Cake

INGREDIENTS:

1 1/2 tablespoon butter or margarine, at room temperature
2 1/2 tablespoons canola oil
1 cup sweetener/brown sugar blend (Splenda), divided
1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 pinch salt
1 cup fat-free milk
2 cups chopped rhubarb
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

PREPARATION:

With an electric mixer, cream together butter, oil and 3/4 cup brown sugar blend. Add egg and vanilla and mix thoroughly.

In a separate mixing bowl, stir together flour, baking soda, and salt.

Add dry ingredients to creamed ingredients alternately with milk.

When well blended, mix in rhubarb by hand. Pour batter into greased 9 x 13 glass baking pan. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup reserved brown sugar blend and cinnamon.

Bake at 350 F for 40 minutes.

NUTRITION:
136 calories, 5g fat, 19g carbohydrates, 4g protein per serving.

http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/581/Diabetic-Rhubarb-Coffee-Cake105865.shtml

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