Cincinnati’s Findlay Market is a world unto itself

March 18, 2013 at 8:35 AM | Posted in Food, fruits, vegetables | Leave a comment
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I came across this article from the Boston Globe last week. A great piece on on the Cincinnati areas oldest and best market, The Findlay Market.

 

 

 

Cincinnati’s Findlay Market is a world unto itself

By Amy Sutherland | GLOBE CORRESPONDENT MARCH 12, 2013
CINCINNATI — When traveling, it is hard to resist public markets, but in the United States they can be disappointing. Some are merely

Findlay Market, one of the oldest public markets in the country, offers meats, cheeses, and other refrigerated foods at counters on the inside and fresh produce stands on the outside.

Findlay Market, one of the oldest public markets in the country, offers meats, cheeses, and other refrigerated foods at counters on the inside and fresh produce stands on the outside.

glorified food courts or amusement parks where tourists can ogle a $7 heirloom tomato or watch fishmongers toss striped bass around, rather than a place to buy good ingredients for dinner. It’s a bad sign when you notice that far more people have cameras than shopping bags.

That is never the case at Findlay Market here. Shoppers are lugging totes bulging with feathery fennel, shiny red peppers, and neatly wrapped white butcher packages. They grab numbers at cheese counters, smell the cantaloupes, and pepper butchers with questions.

Cincinnatians have been shopping for groceries at Findlay since 1855, making it one of the oldest markets in the country. It outdates the city’s two major historic claims, the nation’s first suspension bridge, the John A. Roebling Bridge, and the first baseball team, the Cincinnati Reds. A forward-thinking engineer used a little-known technology to build the cast and wrought iron market frame, which runs the length of two blocks and rises to an airy peak down the middle. Back then, before refrigeration, public markets were a necessity. They were the primary way for city-dwellers to buy fresh, perishable food from surrounding farms.

The large market was sited in what was at the time the city’s densest neighborhood, the Over-the-Rhine. As the name implies, the brick row houses were the homes of German-Americans. They drank beer at 2½ times the national average. You can still find “Biergarten” etched into the bricks of some buildings, but the area has long since changed into a rundown neighborhood of peeling paint and forgotten, weedy lots. Still, shoppers have never stopped coming, and the German heritage lives on at the market’s abundant butcher counters.

At Kroeger Meats, you’ll find a long stretch of sausage shimmering in the voluminous case’s bright light. There are four kinds of metts,

Findlay Market's endless butcher counters, many filled with sausages, speak to Cincinnati's German heritage.

Findlay Market’s endless butcher counters, many filled with sausages, speak to Cincinnati’s German heritage.

brats made from a recipe brought from Germany, orange-y andouille, chorizo, and a pork sausage made with Vidalia onions. Here the clerk can explain the difference between a southern German frankfurter and a northern German frankfurter. Or you can buy both and taste for yourself.

At the extremely popular Silverglades, which can be tough on a shopper with a touch of claustrophobia but worth the suffering, you’ll find more sausages as well as German cold cuts, such as coarse teawurst, bloodwurst, and pfefferwurst, as well as disc after disc of cheese. To give their orders, customers have to crane their necks around stacks of bread loaves and crackers on the high case, but its amazing what you can put up with when you want some black forest salami.
Besides this is market time, when you enjoy shopping instead of racing through a grocery store tossing yogurt into your cart. Findlay Market feels like a world unto itself, a kind of mini village within the city. The streets to either side of the original building are closed to traffic and have seats here and there so you can sit down and devour a pulled pork sandwich or a stick of landjager. All the refrigerated food, the planks of ribs, the ruby colored-crawdads are inside the building. Fresh produce stands line the outside, no matter the weather. Small shops such as Dean’s Mediterranean Imports, where you can pick up a jar of almond jam or a bottle of rosewater, ring the market.

When Findlay was renovated 10 years ago, devotees held their breath for fear it would beDisney-fied. They needn’t have worried. There are more food vendors, including the very fine crepes at Taste of Belgium and the fresh spring rolls at Pho Lang Thang, but they have not overtaken the market. Nor have the soap sellers and street musicians. Instead they’ve made the market more of a fair in a good way and brought in more people, and noticeably more families.

What hasn’t changed is the kinds of people you’ll see at Findlay. All kinds, as in all ages, incomes and colors, still shop here. It is one of the few places in Cincinnati where people from all walks of life mix.

And what has the power to draw them? Food, of course.

Findlay Market, 1801 Race St., Cincinnati, http://www.findlaymarket.org

 

 

http://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/food-dining/2013/03/12/cincinnati-findlay-market-world-unto-itself/CjcnNLPBv84zo0x0Ua9ggL/story.html

Findlay Market – Cincinnati, Ohio

September 25, 2012 at 10:15 AM | Posted in cooking, Food | 1 Comment
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I wanted to pass along some info about one of Cincinnati’s oldest continuously operated public markets. It seems everytime you go there you find something new! If your ever in the area make sure you visit!

 


Findlay Market

1801 Race Street
Cincinnati, OH 45202
Tel. 513-665-4839
Fax. 513-721-3480

Findlay Market is Ohio’s oldest continuously operated public market and one of Cincinnati’s most cherished institutions. The Market is located just blocks from downtown in Over-the-Rhine, a dense historic neighborhood rich in 19th century architecture. Open Tuesday through Sunday, Findlay Market is home year-around to about two dozen indoor merchants selling meat, fish, poultry, produce, flowers, cheese, deli, and ethnic foods. On Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from April to November the Market also hosts a thriving farmers market, dozens of outdoor vendors, numerous street performers, and lots of special events.

Findlay Market is a gathering place for people from all over the city. It routinely attracts perhaps the most socially, economically, racially, and ethnically diverse crowds found anywhere in Cincinnati. They come for the sights and sounds and smells of an old-fashioned public market, for the great variety of fabulous fresh foods, for bargains, for people watching, and for a quintessentially urban shopping experience.

Hours
9am to 6pm – Tuesday through Friday

8am to 6pm on Saturday

10am to 4pm on Sunday

Closed Monday

Findlay Market is open year-round

Location
Findlay Market is located just blocks from downtown Cincinnati, in Over-The-Rhine on Elder Street between Elm and Race.
1801 Race Street,
Cincinnati, OH 45202

Farmers Market
The Farmers Market is held every Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, from April through November.

 

Harvest Calendar

Discover what’s fresh this month at Findlay Market! Our Harvest Calendar shows you what’s in season, all season! The periods presented are approximate. Harvest periods may being a week to ten days earlier during a warmer than usual year. A cool spring will delay crop maturity. Also visit Season’s Eatings for seasonal recipes, and cook up something fresh!

October
Fruit: Apples, Grapes, Strawberries (Everbearing), Watermelon
Vegetables: Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Cilantro, Collards, Endive, Escarole, Kale, Leeks, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Dry Onions, Green Onions, Parsley, Parsnips, Bell Peppers, Hot Peppers, Sweet Peppers, Potatoes, Pumpkins, Radishes, Spinach, Winter Squash, Sweet Corn, Tomatoes, Turnip Greens, Fall Turnips

November
Vegetables: Summer Squash, Zucchini, Turnips
Storage Crops: Apples, Potatoes, Winter Squash, etc.

December
Storage Crops: Apples, Potatoes, Winter Squash, etc.
Value-Added Products: Jams, Baked Goods, etc.
Other: Cheese, Meat, Eggs

January
Storage Crops: Apples, Potatoes, Winter Squash, etc.
Value-Added Products: Jams, Baked Goods, etc.
Other: Cheese, Meat, Eggs

February
Storage Crops: Apples, Potatoes, Winter Squash, etc.
Value-Added Products: Jams, Baked Goods, etc.
Other: Cheese, Meat, Eggs

Contact
T: (513) 665-4839
E: info@findlaymarket.org
http://www.findlaymarket.org/

Bockfest 2012 – Celebrating 20 years!

March 2, 2012 at 12:40 PM | Posted in brats, Festivals, Food, grilling | Leave a comment
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All about Bockfest! You can click on the link at the bottom to get all the info.

Bockfest 2012 – Celebrating 20 years!

March 2-4, 2012

Bockfest is a celebration of historic Over-the-Rhine, Cincinnati‘s brewing heritage and the coming of spring. There are several bock beer festivals that take place around the world, but Cincinnati‘s Bockfest is the oldest and largest in the United States. Bockfest occurs during the first weekend of March. It begins with a parade on Friday evening that starts at Arnold’s Bar & Grill, Cincinnati’s oldest saloon. The parade is lead by a goat pulling a keg of bock beer and the reigning Sausage Queen. It ends at Bockfest Hall where the ceremonial first keg is blessed, the best Parade entries are honored, and Bockfest officially begins. The Hall is open throughout the weekend and features live entertainment, great food, historic walking tours, authors and breweriana, a homebrew competition, Continental Sunday celebrations and lots of delicious bock beer. Bockfest is not just limited to the Hall. It occurs in a number of participating venues in Over-the-Rhine and the central business district. There is no admission fee for the hall and typically no admission fee for the participating venues. (If a venue charges a fee, it will be indicated on the event schedule.) A free shuttle bus runs a continuous loop around location, including Garfield Suites which is offering a special Bockfest Rate for festival goers.

Events:
Pretzelfest
Steins in the Rhine
20th Celebration Dinner
Sausage Queen
Precipitation Retaliation
Bock Tapping
Bockfest Weekend Bockfest Parade
Bockfest Hall
Continental Sunday
Brewery & Church Tours
Participating Venues
Shop Bock & The Craft Menagerie

http://bockfest.com/

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