Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Turkey Bratwurst with Easy Relish

March 9, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | 2 Comments
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is a Turkey Bratwurst with Easy Relish. Made with my favorite Brat, JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Bratwurst. These are so delicious and cook up so perfect! Topped with cucumber, red onion, chopped parsley, and Italian salad dressing. Get the Grilling Season off the right way with this recipe. Also included is info and a link to the Jennie – O Lean Turkey Bratwurst. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

Turkey Bratwurst with Easy Relish
Relish in the accomplishment of making a delicious homemade relish. Ready in under 15 minutes and made with fresh cucumber, red onion and chopped parsley, it tastes great on our lean turkey brats!

INGREDIENTS
1 (19-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Bratwurst
1 large cucumber, seeded and chopped
¼ cup chopped red onion
1 tablespoon chopped parsley leaves
2 tablespoons Italian salad dressing
5 bratwurst buns

DIRECTIONS
1) Cook bratwursts as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165ºF. as measured by a meat thermometer.
2) In small bowl, combine cucumber, onion, parsley and dressing. Place brats on buns and top with dressing mixture.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 320
Protein 22g
Carbohydrates 26g
Fiber 1g
Sugars 6g
Fat 14g
Cholesterol 75mg
Sodium 920mg
Saturated Fat 4g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/312-turkey-bratwurst-with-easy-relish

 

Jennie – O Lean Turkey Bratwurst
JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Bratwurst is a juicy, full-flavored bratwurst that’s easy to grill, boil, bake or even stick in a slow cooker with fresh sauerkraut! No matter how you decide to cook it, you’ll be getting the bratwurst taste you crave. Grab a pack today in your grocery store refrigerated section!

* GLUTEN FREE
* 65% LESS FAT THAN REGULAR PORK SAUSAGE
8 19-OZ PACKAGE (1.22 LBS)

NUTRITION INFORMATION
Serving Size 109 g
Calories 170
Calories From Fat 90
Total Fat 10.0 g
Saturated Fat 3.0 g
Trans Fat .0 g
Cholestero l70 mg
Sodium 700 mg
Total Carbohydrates 2 g
Dietary Fiber 0 g
Sugars 2 g
Protein 17 g
Vitamin A 2%
Vitamin C 2%
Iron 6%
Calcium 2%
https://www.jennieo.com/products/74-lean-turkey-bratwurst

Jungle Jim’s Weekend of Fire October 1 & 2, 2016

September 28, 2016 at 5:08 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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Friday, September 30, 2016 from 6pm – 10pm
Saturday, October 1, 2016 from 11am – 7pm
Sunday, October 2, 2016 from 11am – 4pm

 

 

The Oscar Event Center at Jungle Jim’s International Market
5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, OH 45014, 513-674-6055

 

 

jungle-jims-weekend-of-fire-october-1-2-2016

Here’s one wild weekend with hot food and cool entertainment! Lots of great ‘hot’ people (hot food makers, bloggers and chiliheads) come out for samples, fun, contests, prizes, and great crowds to fill The Oscar Event Center at Jungle Jim’s on October 1st and 2nd.

For this weekend only, you can sample and purchase foods from all over the country at our Fiery Food Show! Hot and fiery or mild and meek; you choose your favorites and can buy enough to last. Hot Sauces, BBQ sauces, salsas, rubs and all sorts of spicy foods will be available – and there’s more! In The Arena of Fire, we’ll have wild and wacky contests beginning on Saturday and running hourly until the show ends on Sunday.

Now a 3-day event – that’s right, we’ve added a special Vendor Appreciation Night! – this year’s Weekend of Fire is going to be exceptionally spicy as we look back over 10 years of flavor, sweat, and smiles. Fiery food favorites from the last 10 years will be set up throughout the festival, as vendors from our already storied past come to set up shop so you can try their wickedly hot wares. From hot sauce to BBQ sauce, to rubs, marinades, and everything in between, we’re packing the Oscar Event Center with as much heat as it can handle (and then some).

Feelin’ brave? The Arena of Fire is going to be smokin’ hot as we introduce new contests, bring back a few favorites, and truly turn the heat up as we challenge those who dare to enter the arena with the spiciest creations we can come up with.

 
http://www.junglejims.com/weekendoffire/
Jungle Jim’s Weekend of Fire
Contact Us • 513.674.6000 • Facebook
http://www.junglejims.comhttp://www.junglefests.com

Condiment of the Week – Relish

April 28, 2016 at 4:56 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | Leave a comment
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Hot Dog Relish

Hot Dog Relish

A relish is a cooked, pickled, or chopped vegetable or fruit food item typically used as a condiment in particular to enhance a staple. In the United States, the word relish is frequently used to describe a single variety of relish —pickle or dill relish, made from finely chopped pickled cucumbers. Such relish is commonly used as a condiment, and is an important ingredient in many varieties of the U.S. version of tartar sauce.

It originated in India and has since become popular throughout the world. Examples are jams, chutneys, and the North American relish, a pickled cucumber jam eaten with hot dogs or hamburgers.

 
The item generally consists of discernible vegetable or fruit pieces in a sauce, although the sauce is subordinate in character to the vegetable or fruit pieces. It might consist of a single type of vegetable or fruit, or a combination of these. These fruits or vegetables might be coarsely or finely chopped, but generally a relish is not as smooth as a sauce-type condiment, such as ketchup. The overall taste sensation might be sweet or savory, hot or mild, but it is always a strong flavor that complements or adds to the primary food item with which it is served.

Relish probably came about from the need to preserve vegetables in the winter. In India (where the preparation originated from), this generally includes either vegetables, herbs or fruits.

In the United States, the most common commercially available relishes are made from pickled cucumbers and are known in the food trade as pickle relishes. Two variants of this are hamburger relish (pickle relish in a ketchup base or sauce) and hotdog relish (pickle relish in a mustard base or sauce). Other readily available commercial relishes in the United States include corn (maize) relish. Heinz, Vlasic, and Claussen are well known in the United States as producers of pickled cucumbers and pickle relishes.

A notable relish is the Gentleman’s Relish, which was invented in 1828 by John Osborn and contains spiced anchovy. It is traditionally spread sparingly atop unsalted butter on toast.

Within North America, relish is much more commonly used in Canada and Alaska than in the contiguous United

Red pepper relish

Red pepper relish

States on food items such as hamburgers or hot dogs. One exception is in the Chicago area, where bright green sweet pickle relish adorns hot dogs when “everything” is the order on the dog. American-based fast food chains do not normally put relish on hamburgers even at their locations in Canada and Alaska, whereas Canadian fast food chains (such as Harvey’s) do have it as a regular option just like ketchup, mustard, etc. American-based fast food chains use regular pickles to a greater extent. If it is offered as an option at Canadian locations of American-based fast food restaurants (e.g. Wendy’s), it is generally offered in individually portioned packets rather than added atop the burger. Restaurants, fast food franchises and sports stadiums in Canada prominently offer relish as a topping on hamburgers and hot dogs along with ketchup and mustard, whereas this is less common in most of the United States (although there is variation within the United States).

 

Condiment of the Week – Chutney

January 7, 2016 at 5:55 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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Chatney, Chatni

Chatney, Chatni

Chutney (Hindi/ Nepali – “चटनी” also transliterated chatney or chatni, Sindhi: چٽڻي‎) is a side dish in the cuisines of the Indian subcontinent that can vary from a tomato relish to a ground peanut garnish or a yogurt, cucumber and mint dip.

An offshoot that took root in Anglo-Indian cuisine is usually a tart fruit such as sharp apples, rhubarb or damson pickle made milder by an equal weight of sugar (usually demerara or brown sugar to replace jaggery in some Indian sweet chutneys) Vinegar was added to the recipe for English-style chutney that traditionally aims to give a long shelf life so that fall fruit can be preserved for use throughout the year (as are jams, jellies and pickles) or else to be sold as a commercial product. Indian pickles use mustard oil as a pickling agent, but Anglo-Indian style chutney uses malt or cider vinegar which produces a milder product that in western cuisine is usually eaten with a Cheddar-type cheese or with cold meats and fowl, typically in cold pub lunches.

Nowadays, some of the making of pickles and chutneys that at one time in India was done entirely in people’s homes has partly passed over into commercial production. The disadvantage of commercial chutneys and those produced in western style with vinegar and large amounts of sugar is that the main aim of sugar and vinegar as preservatives is to make the product safe for long-term consumption. Regular consumption of these products (as distinct from the original Indian array of fresh relishes) can add to total sugar consumption being increased to unhealthy levels.

In India, chutneys can be either made alongside pickles that are matured in the sun for up to two weeks and kept up to a year or, more usually, are freshly made from fresh ingredients that can be kept a couple of days or a week in the refrigerator.

In south India, Thogayal or Thuvayal (Tamil) are preparations similar to chutney but with a pasty consistency.

Medicinal plants that are believed to have a beneficial effect are sometimes made into chutneys, for example Pirandai Thuvayal or ridged gourd chutney (Peerkangai Thuvayal). Ridged gourd can be bought in Chinese and Indian shops in large towns in the west. and, when dried, becomes a bath sponge known as a luffa or loofah.

Bitter gourd can also serve as a base for a chutney which is like a relish or, alternatively as a dried powder.

Occasionally, chutneys that contrast in taste and colour can be served together — a favorite combination being a green mint and chili chutney with a contrasting sweet brown tamarind and date chutney.

Chutneys may be ground with a mortar and pestle or an ammikkal (Tamil). Spices are added and ground, usually in a particular order; the wet paste thus made is sauteed in vegetable oil, usually gingelly (sesame) or peanut oil. Electric blenders or food processors can be used as labor-saving alternatives to stone grinding.

American and European-style chutneys are usually fruit, vinegar, and sugar cooked down to a reduction, with added

Mango chutney

Mango chutney

flavourings. These may include sugar, salt, garlic, tamarind, onion or ginger. Western-style chutneys originated from Anglo-Indians at the time of the British Raj recreated Indian chutneys using English orchard fruits — sour cooking apples and rhubarb, for example. They would often contain dried fruit: raisins, currants and sultanas.

They were a way to use a glut of fall fruit and preserving techniques were similar to sweet fruit preserves using approximately an equal weight of fruit and sugar, the vinegar and sugar acting as preservatives.

South Indian chutney powders are made from roasted dried lentils to be sprinkled on idlis and dosas. Peanut chutneys can be made wet or as a dry powder.

Spices commonly used in chutneys include fenugreek, coriander, cumin and asafoetida (hing). Other prominent ingredients and combinations include cilantro, capsicum, mint (coriander and mint chutneys are often called hari chutney, Hindi for “green”), Tamarind or Imli (often called meethi chutney, as meethi in Hindi means “sweet”), sooth (or saunth, made with dates and ginger), coconut, onion, prune, tomato, red chili, green chili, mango lime (made from whole, unripe limes), garlic, coconut, peanut, dahi, green tomato, dhaniya pudina (cilantro and mint), peanut (shengdana chutney in Marathi), ginger, yogurt, red chili powder, tomato onion chutney, cilantro mint coconut chutney and apricot.

Major Grey’s Chutney is a type of sweet and spicy chutney popular in the United Kingdom and the United States. The recipe was reportedly created by a 19th-century British Army officer of the same name (likely apocryphal) who presumably lived in Colonial India. Its characteristic ingredients are mango, raisins, vinegar, lime juice, onion, tamarind extract, sweetening and spices. Several companies produce a Major Grey’s Chutney, in India, the UK and the US.

 

 

Chutneys

Chutneys

Similar in preparation and usage to a pickle, simple spiced chutneys can be dated to 500 BC. Originating in India, this method of preserving food was subsequently adopted by the Romans and later British empires, who then started exporting this to the colonies, Australia and North America.

As greater imports of foreign and varied foods increased into northern Europe, chutney fell out of favor. This combined with a greater ability to refrigerate fresh foods and an increasing amount of glasshouses meant chutney and pickle were relegated to military and colonial use. Chutney reappeared in India around the 1780s as a popular appetizer

Diego Álvarez Chanca brought back chili peppers from the Americas. After discovering their medicinal properties, Chanca developed a chutney to administer them. This coincided with the British Royal Navy’s use of a lime pickle or chutney to ward off scurvy on journeys to the new world.

In the early 17th century, British colonization of the Indian subcontinent relied on preserved food stuffs such as lime pickles, chutneys and marmalades. (Marmalades proved unpopular due to their sweetness and a lack of available sugar.)

Beginning in the 17th century, fruit chutneys were shipped to European countries like England and France as luxury goods. These imitations were called “mangoed” fruits or vegetables, the word ‘chutney’ still being associated with the lower working classes.

Major Grey’s Chutney is thought to have been developed by a British officer who had traveled to India. The formula was eventually sold to Crosse and Blackwell, a major British food manufacturer, probably in the early 1800s. In the 19th century, types of chutney like Major Grey’s or Bengal Club created for Western tastes were shipped to Europe from Monya.

Generally these chutneys are fruit, vinegar, and sugar cooked down to a reduction.

The tradition of chutney-making spread through the English-speaking world, especially in the Caribbean and American South, where chutney is a popular condiment for ham, pork, and fish.

 

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Leftover Cranberry Relish Salad

November 20, 2015 at 5:45 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is Leftover Cranberry Relish Salad. Another excellent side dish from the Jennie – O website that will be perfect for those Thanksgiving leftovers! Check the Jennie O website for all your upcoming Holiday recipe ideas. http://www.jennieo.com/

 
Leftover Cranberry Relish SaladLeftover Thanksgiving Turkey Sandwich

Ingredients
6 cups torn bibb lettuce leaves
1 avocado, sliced
2 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
¾ cup cranberry relish
¼ cup toasted pistachios
salt and pepper, if desired

 
Directions
In large bowl add lettuce, avocado and goat cheese. Top with relish and pistachios. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper, if desired. Serve immediately.

Nutritional InformationJennie O Make the Switch
Calories 160 Fat 8g
Protein 4g Cholesterol 5mg
Carbohydrates 21g Sodium 50mg
Fiber 3g Saturated Fat 2g
Sugars 1g
http://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1033-Leftover-Cranberry-Relish-Salad

One of America’s Favorites – Hot Dogs

September 28, 2015 at 5:33 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A hot dog (also spelled hotdog) is a cooked sausage, traditionally grilled or steamed and served in a sliced bun as a

Grilled hot dogs

Grilled hot dogs

sandwich. There are also Hot dog variants that include the corn dog and pigs in blankets. Typical hot dog garnishes include mustard, ketchup, onions, mayonnaise, relish, cheese, chili, and sauerkraut.

The sausages were culturally imported from Germany and popularized in the United States, where they were a working class street food sold at hot dog stands that came to be associated with baseball and America. Hot dog preparation and condiment styles also vary regionally across the United States. The hot dog’s cultural traditions include the Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest and Wienermobile.

 

 

Claims about hot dog invention are difficult to assess, as stories assert the creation of the sausage, the placing of the

A "home-cooked" hot dog

A “home-cooked” hot dog

sausage (or another kind of sausage) on bread or a bun as finger food, the popularization of the existing dish, or the application of the name “hot dog” to a sausage and bun combination most commonly used with ketchup or mustard and sometimes relish.

The word frankfurter comes from Frankfurt, Germany, where pork sausages similar to hot dogs originated. These sausages, Frankfurter Würstchen, were known since the 13th century and given to the people on the event of imperial coronations, starting with the coronation of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor as King. Wiener refers to Vienna, Austria, whose German name is “Wien”, home to a sausage made of a mixture of pork and beef (cf. Hamburger, whose name also derives from a German-speaking city). Johann Georg Lahner, a 18th/19th century butcher from the Franconian city of Coburg, is said to have brought the Frankfurter Würstchen to Vienna, where he added beef to the mixture and simply called it Frankfurter. Nowadays, in German speaking countries, except Austria, hot dog sausages are called Wiener or Wiener Würstchen (Würstchen means “little sausage”), in differentiation to the original pork only mixture from Frankfurt. In Swiss German, it is called Wienerli, while in Austria the terms Frankfurter or Frankfurter Würstel are used.

Around 1870, on Coney Island, German immigrant Charles Feltman began selling sausages in rolls.

Others are credited with first serving hot dogs on rolls. A Bavarian immigrant named Feuchtwanger allegedly pioneered the practice in the American midwest; there are several versions of the story with varying details. According to one account, Antonoine Feuchtwanger’s wife proposed the use of a bun in 1880: Feuchtwanger sold hot dogs on the streets of St. Louis, Missouri, United States, and provided gloves to his customers so that they could handle the sausages without burning their hands. Losing money when customers did not return the gloves, Feuchtwanger’s wife suggested serving the food in a roll instead. In another version, Anton Ludwig Feuchtwanger served sausages in rolls at the World’s Fair–either the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago or the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St Louis–again allegedly because the white gloves provided to customers to protect their hands were being kept as souvenirs.

The association between hot dogs and baseball began as early as 1893 with Chris von der Ahe, a German immigrant who owned not only the St. Louis Browns, but also an amusement park.

Another claim of inventing the hot dog is told by Harry M. Stevens, an American sports concessionaire whose vendors sold German sausages and rolls to spectators at the old New York Polo Grounds during the winter. He called them “Dachshund sandwiches”, but a New York Post cartoonist “couldn’t spell dachshund, so when he drew the cartoon, he called them hot dogs.”

In 1916, a Polish American employee of Feltman’s named Nathan Handwerker was encouraged by Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante, both working as waiters/musicians, to go into business in competition with his former employer. Handwerker undercut Feltman’s by charging five cents for a hot dog when his former employer was charging ten.

At an earlier time in food regulation, when the hot dog was suspect, Handwerker made sure that men wearing surgeon’s smocks were seen eating at Nathan’s Famous to reassure potential customers.

 

 

Ingredients:

Common hot dog ingredients include:

* Meat trimmings and fat
* Flavorings, such as salt, garlic, and paprika
* Preservatives (cure) – typically sodium erythorbate and sodium nitrite
Pork and beef are the traditional meats used in hot dogs. Less expensive hot dogs are often made from chicken or turkey, using low-cost mechanically separated poultry. Hot dogs often have high sodium, fat and nitrite content, ingredients linked to health problems. Changes in meat technology and dietary preferences have led manufacturers to use turkey, chicken, vegetarian meat substitutes, and to lower the salt content.

If a manufacturer produces two types of hot dogs, “wieners” tend to contain pork and are blander, while “franks” tend to be all beef and more strongly seasoned.

 
Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.
Commercial preparation:
Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.
Natural casing hot dogs:
As with most sausages, hot dogs must be in a casing to be cooked. Traditional casing is made from the small intestines of sheep. The products are known as “natural casing” hot dogs or frankfurters. These hot dogs have firmer texture and a “snap” that releases juices and flavor when the product is bitten.

Kosher casings are expensive in commercial quantities in the US, so kosher hot dogs are usually skinless or made with reconstituted collagen casings.

Skinless hot dogs:
“Skinless” hot dogs must use a casing in the cooking process when the product is manufactured, but the casing is usually a long tube of thin cellulose that is removed between cooking and packaging. This process was invented in Chicago in 1925 by Erwin O. Freund, founder of Visking which would later become Viskase Companies.

The first skinless hot dog casings were produced by Freund’s new company under the name “Nojax”, short for “no jackets” and sold to local Chicago sausage makers.

Skinless hot dogs vary in the texture of the product surface but have a softer “bite” than natural casing hot dogs. Skinless hot dogs are more uniform in shape and size than natural casing hot dogs and less expensive.

Home cooking hot dogs:
Hot dogs are prepared and eaten in a variety of ways. The wieners may be boiled, grilled, fried, steamed, broiled, baked, or microwaved. The cooked wiener may be served on a bun (usually topped with condiments), or it may be used as an ingredient in another dish. Various models of hot dog toasters exist that cook the hot dog and buns by toasting.

 

 

In the US, “hot dog” may refer to just the sausage or to the combination of a sausage in a bun. Many nicknames for

A Detroit Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion, and mustard

A Detroit Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion, and mustard

hot dogs have popped up over the years. A hot dog can often be seen under the names of frankfurter, frank, red hot, wiener, weenie, durger, coney, or just “dog”.
Hot dog restaurants
Hot dog stands and trucks sell hot dogs at street and highway locations. Wandering hot dog vendors sell their product in baseball parks. At convenience stores, hot dogs are kept heated on rotating grills. 7-Eleven sells the most grilled hot dogs in North America — 100 million annually. Hot dogs are also common on restaurants’ children’s menus.
Condiments
Hot dogs may be served plain, but are commonly served with a variety of condiments, including ketchup, mustard, chile con carne, pickle relish, sauerkraut, onion, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, cheese, and chili peppers.

In 2005, the US-based National Hot Dog & Sausage Council (part of the American Meat Institute) found mustard to be the most popular condiment, with 32% of respondents preferring it; 23% of Americans said they preferred ketchup; chili con carne came in third at 17%, followed by relish at 9% and onions at 7%. Southerners showed the strongest preference for chili, while Midwesterners showed the greatest affinity for ketchup.

Condiments vary across the country. All-beef Chicago-style hot dogs are topped with mustard, fresh tomatoes, onions, sport peppers, bright green relish, dill pickles, and celery salt, but they exclude ketchup.

Many variations are named after regions other than the one in which they are popular. Italian hot dogs popular in New Jersey include peppers, onions, and potatoes. Meaty Michigan hot dogs are popular in upstate New York (as are white hots), while beefy Coney Island hot dogs are popular in Michigan. In New York City, conventional hot dogs are available on Coney Island, as are bagel dogs. Hot wieners, or weenies, are a staple in Rhode Island where they are sold at restaurants with the misleading name “New York System.” Texas hot dogs are spicy variants found in upstate New York and Pennsylvania (and as “all the way dogs” in New Jersey), but not Texas.

Some baseball parks have signature hot dogs, such as Fenway Franks at Fenway Park in Boston and Dodger Dogs at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. The Fenway signature is that the hot dog is boiled and grilled, and then served on a New England-style bun, covered with ketchup and relish. Often during Red Sox games, vendors traverse the stadium selling the hot dogs plain, giving customers the choice of adding the condiments.

 

 

In Canada
Skinner’s Restaurant, in Lockport, Manitoba is reputed to be Canada’s oldest hot dog outlet in continuous operation, founded in 1929, by Jim Skinner Sr. Hotdogs served at Skinners are European style footlongs with natural casings, manufactured by Winnipeg Old Country Sausage in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

The Half Moon Drive In, also in Lockport, Manitoba and located directly across the river from Skinners, was established in 1938 by brothers Peter and Louie Kosowicz. The original drive in consisted of three wooden buildings shaped like semicircles—one was for takeout, one was for dine-in, and the third was a dance hall and later an arcade. The Half Moon also serves European-style wieners manufactured by Winnipeg Old Country Sausage. One of the most popular items is the Moon Dog, consisting of cheese, bacon, fried onions, pickles and mustard, and the Half Moon serves about 2000 on an average summer weekend day.

 

 

Hot dogs outside North America
For a list of international differences in hot dogs, see Hot dog variations.
In most of the world, “hot dog” is recognized as a sausage in a bun, but the type varies considerably. The name is applied to something that would not be described as a hot dog in North America. For example, in New Zealand, it refers to a battered sausage, often on a stick (which is known as a corn dog in North America), and the version in a bun is called an “American hot dog”.

 

 

The world’s longest hot dog created was 197 ft, which rested within a 198 ft bun. The hot dog was prepared by

The world's longest hot dog, at 197 feet

The world’s longest hot dog, at 197 feet

Shizuoka Meat Producers for the All-Japan Bread Association, which baked the bun and coordinated the event, including official measurement for the world record. The hot dog and bun were the center of a media event in celebration of the Association’s 50th anniversary on August 4, 2006, at the Akasaka Prince Hotel, Tokyo, Japan.

A hot dog prepared by head chef Joe Calderone in Manhattan sold for $69 during the National Hot Dog Day in 2010, making it the most expensive hot dog sold at the time. The hot dog was topped with truffle oil, duck foie gras, and truffle butter.

On May 31, 2012, Guinness World Records certified the world record for most expensive hot dog at $145.49. The “California Capitol City Dawg”, served at Capitol Dawg in Sacramento, California, features a grilled 18 in all-beef in natural casing frank from Chicago, served on a fresh baked herb and oil focaccia roll, spread with white truffle butter, then grilled. The record breaking hot dog is topped with a whole grain mustard from France, garlic & herb mayonnaise, sauteed chopped shallots, organic mixed baby greens, maple syrup marinated/fruitwood smoked uncured bacon from New Hampshire, chopped tomato, expensive moose cheese from Sweden, sweetened dried cranberries, basil olive oil/pear-cranberry-coconut balsamic vinaigrette, and ground peppercorn. Proceeds from the sale of each 3 lb super dog are donated to the Shriners Hospitals for Children.

A cooked hot dog on bun with mustard garnish

 

 

Wild idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Cilantro Skirt Steaks with Roasted Corn Relish

October 22, 2014 at 5:19 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is Cilantro Skirt Steaks with Roasted Corn Relish. If you’ve never tried the Wild Idea Buffalo Cilantro Skirt Steaks you are in for a treat, the most delicious Skirt Steak I’ve ever had! It’s another great recipe from Jill O’Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo. http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

 

Cilantro Skirt Steaks with Roasted Corn Relish

Cilantro Skirt Steaks with Roasted Corn Relish
Freshly harvested tomatillos from the Wild Idea Buffalo Garden make our Wild Idea Bison Cilantro Marinated Skirt Steaks super delicious! We’ve done the work for you by pre-marinating this flavorful cut – making it a great, go to dinner item when time is tight. Add a quick sauté of Roasted Corn Relish and grilled potatoes and dinner is served!

 

Cilantro Skirt Steaks with Roasted Corn Relish (serves 4)
This flavorful dish is a favorite of mine. The clean citrus marinade flavors compliment the grass-fed bison and the fresh garden vegetables make it a real celebration of the season. It’s quick and easy to prepare, and is as pleasing to the eye as the palate. Serve with grilled/baked potatoes for a complete simple supper. *To avoid fine dicing the vegetables for the relish, you can flash process coarse cut vegetables in a food processor.

 

 

 

Ingredients:
1 – 1 lb. Wild Idea Buffalo Pre-marinated Skirt Steak
4 – cups Roasted Corn Relish
Halved cherry tomatoes

 
Preparation:
1) Allow packaged steak to rest at room temperature for 2 hours. Remove pre-marinated Buffalo Skirt Steak from package and shake off the excess marinade.
2) Preheat gas grill to high heat, or prepare charcoal or wood fire to amber/white coals.
3) Place steak over the hottest area of the grill and grill steak for 1½ minutes on each side, closing grill lid while grilling.
4) Remove steak from grill and place on platter or cutting board and cover with foil. Allow covered steak to rest for a few minutes before slicing.
5) Slice steak on the bias and top with 1 cup of the Roasted Corn Relish. Garnish with halved tomatoes. Pass remaining relish with meal.

 

 

 

Roasted Corn Relish Ingredients:
3 – cups fresh corn kernels, about 4 ears of corn
2 – tablespoons olive oil
1 – red onion, diced
1 – red bell pepper, diced
1 – jalapeno pepper, diced
3 – garlic cloves, minced
2 – teaspoons cumin
1 – teaspoon coriander
2 – limes, juiced, about ¼ cup
¼ cup cilantro, chopped
1 – teaspoon salt

 
Preparation:
1) In heavy or cast iron skillet, over high heat, roast corn in seasoned, dry pan, tossing occasionally until lightly blackened, about 4 minutes.
2) Transfer roasted corn into a bowl.
3) Return pan to burner. Add the olive oil and heat. Add the red onion, peppers, cumin and coriander and sauté for 3 minutes, tossing occasionally.
4) Transfer vegetables into the corn dish and add lime juice and chopped cilantro. Toss to incorporate.
5) Season with salt, adjusting to taste.
Serve at room temperature, hot or cold. *If you have left over Roasted Corn Relish, serve over other grilled meats or with tortilla chips.

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2014/cilantro-skirt-steaks-with-roasted-corn-relish/

 

 

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Cilantro Lime Skirt Steak
Wild Idea Buffalo 16 oz. Cilantro Lime Skirt Steak
With so much summer fun to be had, Jill’s favorite go to, ready to grill, pre-marinated steak is the Cilantro Lime Skirt Steak. The fresh citrus flavors compliment the meats rich sweetness. Perfect for a simple summer meal.

 
http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/collections/pre-marinated-steaks/products/cilantro-lime-skirt-steak

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