One of America’s Favorites – Quick Bread

April 20, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Banana bread is a type of quick bread

Quick bread is any bread leavened with leavening agents other than yeast or eggs. An advantage of quick breads is their ability to be prepared quickly and reliably, without requiring the time-consuming skilled labor and the climate control needed for traditional yeast breads.

Quick breads include many cakes, brownies and cookies—as well as banana bread, beer bread, biscuits, cornbread, muffins, pancakes, scones, and soda bread.

“Quick bread” most probably originated in the United States at the end of the eighteenth century. Before the creation of quick bread, baked goods were leavened either with yeast or by mixing dough with eggs. “Fast bread” is an alternate name.

The discovery or rediscovery of chemical leavening agents and their widespread military, commercial, and home use in the United States dates back to 1846 with the introduction of commercial baking soda in New York, by Church and Dwight of “Arm & Hammer” fame. This development was extended in 1856 by the introduction of commercial baking powder in Massachusetts, although perhaps the best known form of baking powder is “Calumet”, first introduced in Hammond, Indiana and West Hammond, Illinois (later Calumet City, Illinois) in 1889. Both forms of food-grade chemical leaveners are still being produced under their original names, although not within the same corporate structure.

During the American Civil War (1861–1865), the demand for portable and quickly-made food was high, while skilled labor for traditional breadmaking was scarce. This encouraged the adoption of bread which was rapidly made and leavened with baking soda, instead of yeast. The shortage of chemical leaveners in the American South during the Civil War contributed to a food crisis there.

As the Industrial Revolution accelerated, the marketing of mass-produced prepackaged foods was eased by the use of chemical leaveners, which could produce consistent products regardless of variations in source ingredients, time of year, geographical location, weather conditions, and many other factors that could cause problems with environmentally sensitive, temperamental yeast formulations. These factors were traded off against the loss of traditional yeast flavor, nutrition, and texture.

Preparing a quick bread generally involves two mixing containers. One contains all dry ingredients (including chemical leavening agents or agent) and one contains all wet ingredients (possibly including liquid ingredients that are slightly acidic in order to initiate the leavening process). In some variations, the dry ingredients are in a bowl and the wet ingredients are heated sauces in a saucepan off-heat and cooled.

During the chemical leavening process, agents (one or more food-grade chemicals—usually a weak acid and a weak base) are added into the dough during mixing. These agents undergo a chemical reaction to produce carbon dioxide, which increases the baked good’s volume and produces a porous structure and lighter texture. Yeast breads often take hours to rise, and the resulting baked good’s texture can vary greatly based on external factors such as temperature and humidity. By contrast, breads made with chemical leavening agents are relatively uniform, reliable, and quick. Usually, the resulting baked good is softer and lighter than a traditional yeast bread.

Chemical leavening agents include a weak base, such as baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) plus a weak acid, such as cream of tartar, lemon juice, or cultured buttermilk, to create an acid–base reaction that releases carbon dioxide. (Quick bread leavened specifically with baking soda is often called “soda bread”.) Baking powder contains both an acid and a base in dry powdered form, and simply needs a liquid medium in which to react. Other alternative leavening agents are egg whites mechanically beaten to form stiff peaks, as in the case of many waffle recipes, or steam, in the case of cream puffs. Nevertheless, in a commercial process, designated chemical leavening acids and bases are used to make gas production consistent and controlled. Almost all quick breads have the same basic ingredients: flour, leavening, eggs, fat (butter, margarine, shortening, or oil), and liquid such as milk. Ingredients beyond these basic constituents are added for variations in flavor and texture. The type of bread produced varies based predominantly on the method of mixing, the major flavoring, and the ratio of liquid in the batter. Some batters are thin enough to pour, and others thick enough to mold into lumps.

There are three basic methods for making quick breads, which may combine the “rise” of the chemical leavener with advantageous “lift” from other ingredients:

* The stirring method (also known as the quick-bread method, blending method, or muffin method) is used for pancakes, muffins, corn bread, dumplings, and fritters. It calls for measurement of dry and wet ingredients separately, then quickly mixing the two. Often the wet ingredients include beaten eggs, which have trapped air that helps the product to rise. In these recipes, the fats are liquid, such as cooking oil. Usually mixing is done using a tool with a wide head such as a spoon or spatula to prevent the dough from becoming over-beaten, which would break down the egg’s lift.
* The creaming method is frequently used for cake batters. The butter and sugar are “creamed”, or beaten together until smooth and fluffy. Eggs and liquid flavoring are mixed in, and finally dry and liquid ingredients are added in. The creaming method combines rise gained from air bubbles in the creamed butter with the rise from the chemical leaveners. Gentle folding in of the final ingredients avoids destroying these air pockets.
* The shortening method, also known as the biscuit method, is used for biscuits and sometimes scones. This method cuts solid fat (whether lard, butter, or vegetable shortening) into flour and other dry ingredients using a food processor, pastry blender, or two hand-held forks. The layering from this process gives rise and adds flakiness as the folds of fat melt during baking. This technique is said to produce “shortened” cakes and breads, regardless of whether or not the chosen fat is vegetable shortening.

Quick breads also vary widely in the consistency of their dough or batter. There are four main types of quick bread batter:

Pancake batter is made using the stirring method

* Pour batters, such as pancake batter, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:1 and so pours in a steady stream. Also called a “low-ratio” baked good.
* Drop batters, such as cornbread and muffin batters, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:2.
* Soft doughs, such as many chocolate chip cookie doughs, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:3. Soft doughs stick significantly to work surfaces.
* Stiff doughs, such as pie crust and sugar cookie doughs, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:8. Stiff doughs are easy to work in that they only minimally stick to work surfaces, including tools and hands. Also called “high-ratio” baked good.
The above are volumetric ratios and are not based on baker’s percentages or weights.

 

SUGAR FREE BLUEBERRY BANNOCK

May 19, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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I came across a delicious sounding Pastry Recipe, SUGAR FREE BLUEBERRY BANNOCK. I ‘ve never heard of this one but it is described as a flat quick bread that is often cut into wedges, like scones. So if you like Scones, you’ll like this! Plus its Diabetic Friendly, 130 calories. The recipe is from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website which has a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes. Be sure to check it out! So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

SUGAR FREE BLUEBERRY BANNOCK
Bannock is a flat quick bread that is often cut into wedges, like scones. This is a whole-wheat, baked version of a traditional Aboriginal recipe. Canola oil helps produce a light and tender crumb for this blueberry bannock recipe.

Recipe Yield: 8

Ingredients

1 cup whole-wheat flour (250 mL)
1 cup all-purpose flour (250 mL)
3/4 cup fresh or frozen blueberries (175 mL)
2 Tbsp baking powder (30 mL)
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon (2 mL)
1/8 tsp salt (.5 mL)
1/2 cup skim milk (125 mL)
1/2 cup water (125 mL)
1 Tbsp canola oil (15 mL)

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 400F (200C).
2 – In bowl, combine flours, blueberries, baking powder, cinnamon and salt.
3 – Stir in milk, water and canola oil and, using hands, moisten all ingredients, handling dough as little as possible.
4 – Turn dough out of bowl and place on lightly floured surface.
5 – Using hands, form disc about 1/2-inch (1-cm) thick and about 9-10 inches (22-25 cm) in diameter. If necessary, sprinkle with flour to keep dough from sticking. Cut into 8 wedges.
6 – Place wedges on parchment-lined baking sheet and bake for 15-20 minutes or until bannock is golden brown.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 130
Fat: 2 grams
Fiber: 2 grams
Sodium: 340 milligrams
Protein: 5 grams
Carbohydrates: 24 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipe/sugarfree-blueberry-bannock

Easy Banana Recipes

March 24, 2016 at 5:15 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website, Easy Banana Recipes. It’s all about Bananas with these healthy and delicious recipes. Recipes including; Banana-Nut-Chocolate Chip Quick Bread, Gingersnap-Banana Frozen Yogurt, and Caramelized Bananas. It’s all from the EatingWell website! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 

Easy Banana RecipesEatingWell2

Healthy recipes for banana muffins, banana smoothies, banana desserts and more.
There are so many ways to enjoy bananas wiith our delicious recipes for banana smoothies, banana muffins, banana pudding and even savory dishes with bananas. Use up your leftover bananas in our Banana-Nut-Chocolate Chip Quick Bread or impress your guests with a quick, crowd-pleasing dessert like Gingersnap-Banana Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

Banana-Nut-Chocolate Chip Quick Bread
This banana quick bread is full of chocolate chips and toasted heart-healthy walnuts so you get a taste of nuts and chocolate in each bite. This version reduces the fat substantially and uses nonfat buttermilk to make the results extremely moist and tender……

 
Gingersnap-Banana Frozen Yogurt
Stir chopped gingersnaps, sliced bananas and toasted pecans into softened vanilla frozen yogurt for a quick, crowd-pleasing dessert…..

 
Caramelized Bananas
The bananas have to get in and out of the pan in 1 1/2 minutes, no longer, so they stay firm in the center. If you are cooking for 4, you can easily double the recipe; it is important not to crowd the skillet, so get everything ready to go and make it in 2 batches……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Easy Banana Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_banana_recipes

Healthy Muffin Recipes and Healthy Quick Bread Recipes

March 14, 2015 at 4:58 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 2 Comments
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Start your day off healthy with these Healthy Muffin Recipes and Healthy Quick Bread Recipes. It’s all from the EatingWell website, Enjoy! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 
Healthy Muffin Recipes and Healthy Quick Bread RecipesEatingWell2

Wake up with these delicious and healthy muffin recipes and quick bread recipes.
Don’t let muffins fool you: they may sound healthy, but many muffins from stores and restaurants are packed with calories and fat—some contain well over 500 calories! Make your own healthy muffin recipes or healthy quick bread recipes at home with these delicious options.

 
Spiced Apple Cider Muffins
Cider doughnuts, a New England harvest treat, inspired these spice-happy muffins. A crumbly streusel topping made with a small amount of butter provides a delicious finish…..

 
Banana-Bran Muffins
By the end of the week, any bananas left in the fruit bowl are past their prime—just right for these moist bran muffins. Add a handful of dark chocolate chips to entice children to enjoy a fiber-rich treat…..

 
* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Muffin Recipes and Healthy Quick Bread Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_muffin_recipes_healthy_quick_bread_recipes

Quick Bread – Peanut Butter–Banana Bread

January 16, 2015 at 11:30 AM | Posted in Cooking Light | 2 Comments
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Another Quick Bread Classic from Cooking Light! http://www.cookinglight.com/

 

Peanut Butter Banana Bread
Peanut butter is whipped into the basic recipe for a moist banana bread with a hint of nutty flavor. A small amount of chopped roasted peanuts offers delightfully surprising crunch.

 

Cooking Light

Yield: 16 servings (serving size: 1 slice)
Hands-on: 18 Minutes
Total: 1 Hour, 33 Minutes
Ingredients
Bread:
1 1/2 cups mashed ripe banana
1/3 cup plain fat-free yogurt
1/3 cup creamy peanut butter
3 tablespoons butter, melted
2 large eggs
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
6.75 ounces all-purpose flour (about 1 1/2 cups)
1/4 cup ground flaxseed
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
2 tablespoons chopped dry-roasted peanuts
Cooking spray
Glaze:
1/3 cup powdered sugar
1 tablespoon 1% low-fat milk
1 tablespoon creamy peanut butter

 
Preparation
1. Preheat oven to 350°.

2. To prepare bread, combine first 5 ingredients in a large bowl; beat with a mixer at medium speed. Add granulated and brown sugars; beat until blended.

3. Weigh or lightly spoon flour into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Combine flour and next 5 ingredients (through allspice) in a small bowl. Add flour mixture to banana mixture; beat just until blended. Stir in nuts. Pour batter into a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350° for 1 hour and 5 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Remove from oven; cool 10 minutes in pan on a wire rack. Remove bread from pan; cool.

4. To prepare glaze, combine powdered sugar, milk, and 1 tablespoon peanut butter in a small bowl, stirring with a whisk. Drizzle glaze over bread.

Nutritional Information
Amount per serving
Calories: 198 Fat: 7.4g Saturated fat: 2.3g Monounsaturated fat: 2.7g Polyunsaturated fat: 1.8g Protein: 4.7g Carbohydrate: 29.7g Fiber: 1.9g Cholesterol: 28mg Iron: 1.1mg Sodium: 200mg Calcium: 27mg

 

http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/peanut-butter-banana-bread

Quick Bread – Beaten Biscuit

January 10, 2015 at 6:36 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Beaten Biscuit

Beaten Biscuit

Beaten biscuits are a Southern food from the United States, dating from the 19th century. They differ from regular American soft-dough biscuits in that they are more like hardtack. In New England they are called “sea biscuits”, as they were staples aboard whaling ships.

 

 

The dough was originally made from flour, salt, sugar, lard, and cold water, and beaten with a hard object or against a hard surface. It is pricked with a fork prior to baking and cut smaller than a regular biscuit.

How long the biscuits are beaten varies from one recipe to the next, from “at least 15 minutes” to “30 to 45 minutes.” The beating these biscuits undergo is severe: they are banged with a “rolling pin, hammer, or side of an axe”; or they are “pounded with a blunt instrument…[even] a tire iron will do…Granny used to beat ’em with a musket”; one book “instructs the cook to ‘use boys to do it'”—that is, beat the biscuits vigorously “at least 200 times.” Besides ensuring the proper texture for the biscuit, “this beating also serves to vent the cook’s weekly accumulation of pent-up frustrations.”

 

 

These biscuits were traditionally used in “ham biscuits”, a traditional Southern canapé, where they are sliced horizontally and spread with butter, jelly, mustard and filled with pieces of country ham, or sopped up with gravy or syrup. They are sometimes considered “Sunday biscuits” and can be stored for several months in an airtight container. Beaten biscuits were once so popular that special machines, called biscuits brakes, were manufactured to knead the dough in home kitchens. A biscuit brake typically consists of a pair of steel rollers geared together and operated by a crank, mounted on a small table with a marble top and cast iron legs.

Due to the amount of work required to make them, beaten biscuits are no longer popular. Ham biscuits are still widely found in the United States but are made with standard biscuits or dinner rolls.

 

Garden Harvest Cake

December 24, 2014 at 12:14 PM | Posted in Cooking Light | Leave a comment
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Garden Harvest Cake
Cooking Light APRIL 2009

Yield: 9 servings (serving size: 1 slice)Cooking Light
Ingredients
4.5 ounces all-purpose flour (1 cup)
3/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup grated peeled Granny Smith apple (about 1 medium)
1/2 cup grated carrot (about 1 medium)
1/2 cup shredded zucchini
1/4 cup chopped walnuts, toasted
1/4 cup canola oil
1/4 cup nonfat buttermilk
2 large eggs
Cooking spray
Preparation
1. Preheat oven to 350°.

2. Weigh or lightly spoon flour into a dry measuring cup; level with a knife. Combine flour and the next 4 ingredients (through salt) in a large bowl, stirring with a whisk. Add grated apple, grated carrot, shredded zucchini, and walnuts to flour mixture; toss well. Combine canola oil, buttermilk, and eggs in a small bowl, stirring with a whisk. Add egg mixture to flour mixture, stirring just until combined. Spoon batter into an 8 x 4–inch loaf pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350° for 50 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes in pan on a wire rack; remove cake from pan. Cool completely on wire rack before slicing.

 

Nutritional Information
Amount per serving
Calories: 223 Fat: 9.7g Saturated fat: 1g Monounsaturated fat: 4.4g Polyunsaturated fat: 3.6g Protein: 3.8g Carbohydrate: 31.4g Fiber: 1.3g Cholesterol: 47mg Iron: 1.2mg Sodium: 233mg Calcium: 30mg
Search for Recipes by Nutrition Data
http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/garden-harvest-cake

Cinnamon – Pecan Swirl Quick Bread Mix

January 7, 2012 at 11:39 AM | Posted in baking, dessert, nuts, Pillsbury | Leave a comment
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Cinnamon – Pecan Swirl Quick Bread Mix

I usually make the Nut Bread but I tried the Cinnamon Swirl this time. As the Nut Bread the Cinnamon Swirl turned out great! I added a 1/4 cup of chopped Pecans to the mix and I baked them in 3 Mini Loaf pans. The Mini Loaf Pans are a great way to freeze the loaves.

Ingredients:
1 Box Pillsbury Cinnamon Swirl Quick Bread mix
3/4 Cup Water
3 Tablespoons Oil, I used Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 Eggs, I used Egg Beaters
1/4 Cup Chopped Pecans

Directions

1. Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Generously grease bottom of pan.

2. Combine quick bread mix (large clear packet), water, chopped pecans oil and eggs in large bowl. Stir 50 to 75 strokes until mix is well blended. Pour half of batter (about 1-1/3 cups) into greased pan. Sprinkle with 2/3 cup of the swirl mix (small clear packet). Pour remaining batter over swirl mix. Spread carefully to cover. Sprinkle with remaining swirl mix.

3. Bake at 350 degrees F as directed or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool loaf in pan 15 minutes. Loosen edges with knife or metal spatula; remove from pan. Cool coffee cake in pan. 8×4-inch loaf pan: 45 to 55 min. 9×5-inch loaf pan: 40 to 50 min. 8-inch square pan: 30 to 40 min. 9-inch square pan: 25 to 35 min.

4. Squeeze glaze packet 10 to 15 times before opening. Cut off small corner of packed. Drizzle over cooled loaf or coffee cake. High Altitude (Above 3500 Feet): Add 1/4 cup flour to dry mix. Bake as directed. Storage: Wrap leftovers and store in refrigerator up to 1 week or freeze up to 3 months. Tips! Add 1/2 cup mashed ripe banana to the batter. Stir in 1/2 cup of the following: chopped nuts, dried cranberries or raisins.

* I used 3 – 5 1/2″ x 3 1/2″ x 2″ Mini Loaf Foil Pans. These are great to freeze the loaves.

Nutrition Facts

Serv Size 1/14 package (35g mix)
Servings Per Container 14
Calories 150
Calories from Fat 35

Amount/Serving     % Daily Value
Total Fat     4g     6%
Saturated Fat     1.5g     8%
Trans Fat     0g
Cholesterol     0mg     0%
Sodium     140mg     6%
Total Carbohydrate     27g     9%
Dietary Fiber     0g     0%
Sugars     15g
Protein     1g

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