Holiday Dessert Recipes

December 25, 2015 at 5:59 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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It’s Holiday Dessert Recipes from the EatingWell website! Cookies, Cakes, Pies, and Tarts are all featured here. The EatingWell website has a great selection of healthy and delicious recipes for all cuisines! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 

Holiday Dessert RecipesEatingWell2

Celebrate the holiday season with our delicious holiday dessert recipes.
Delight your guests with these healthy holiday dessert recipes. These delicious holiday cake recipes, Christmas cookie recipes, pie recipes, tart recipes and more holiday desserts are a sweet and healthy ending to any holiday meal.

 

 

Chocolate Tart with Hazelnut Shortbread Crust
A sublime silky chocolate custard fills this simple hazelnut shortbread crust. Serve garnished with whipped cream and toasted hazelnuts for a special touch……

 
Chocolate Tart with Hazelnut Shortbread Crust
A sublime silky chocolate custard fills this simple hazelnut shortbread crust. Serve garnished with whipped cream and toasted hazelnuts for a special touch……

 
Caramelized Pear Bread Pudding
Sweet caramelized pears are the highlight of this comforting, custardy, raisin-studded bread pudding. When turned out of its baking dish, the flanlike pudding sits in a pool of intense caramel syrup, making it worthy of any holiday table. Serve warm or chilled…..

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Holiday Dessert Recipes

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/holiday_desserts_recipes

Low-Calorie Holiday Dessert Recipes

December 24, 2015 at 6:12 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website it’s Low-Calorie Holiday Dessert Recipes. You can celebrate the Holiday meals and paries the healthy way with these low calorie dessert recipes. You can find all these healthy dessert recipes along with a great selection of healthy and delicious recipes of all cuisines at the EatingWell website, Enjoy! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 
Low-Calorie Holiday Dessert RecipesEatingWell2

Celebrate the holiday season with these lighter, low-calorie dessert recipes.
We’ve lightened up traditional holiday desserts, such as cheesecake, fruitcake, Christmas cookies and pies, so you can join enjoy dessert this holiday season while watching your weight. Our low-calorie holiday dessert recipes have 250 calories or fewer per serving so you can feel good about celebrating with a sweet and festive treat.

 

 

Marmalade-Glazed Orange Cheesecake
Our Test Kitchen created this showpiece cheesecake to celebrate one of winter’s brightest gifts: the orange. It is exceptionally rich and creamy-tasting, but lower in saturated fat than a traditional cheesecake. The secret is to replace most of the cream cheese with pureed cottage cheese. Be sure to let the food processor do its job and process the cottage cheese until it has a silky texture….

 
Caramelized Pear Bread Pudding
Sweet caramelized pears are the highlight of this comforting, custardy, raisin-studded bread pudding. When turned out of its baking dish, the flanlike pudding sits in a pool of intense caramel syrup, making it worthy of any holiday table. Serve warm or chilled…..

 
Cranberry-Orange Fruit Bars
These sweet-tart cranberry-orange bars are a great addition to a holiday cookie tray or cool weather grab-and-go treat…..

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Low-Calorie Holiday Dessert Recipes

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/low_calorie_holiday_dessert_recipes

Christmas Dishes – Christmas Pudding

December 22, 2015 at 4:26 PM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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This Christmas pudding is decorated with skimmia rather than holly

This Christmas pudding is decorated with skimmia rather than holly

Christmas pudding is a type of pudding traditionally served as part of the Christmas dinner in Britain, Ireland and in some other countries where it has been brought by British emigrants. It has its origins in medieval England, and is sometimes known as plum pudding or just “pud”, though this can also refer to other kinds of boiled pudding involving dried fruit. Despite the name “plum pudding,” the pudding contains no actual plums due to the pre-Victorian use of the word “plums” as a term for raisins. The pudding is composed of many dried fruits held together by egg and suet, sometimes moistened by treacle or molasses and flavored with cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, and other spices. The pudding is aged for a month, months, or even a year; the high alcohol content of the pudding prevents it from spoiling during this time.

 
Many households have their own recipe for Christmas pudding, some handed down through families for generations. Essentially the recipe brings together what traditionally were expensive or luxurious ingredients — notably the sweet spices that are so important in developing its distinctive rich aroma, and usually made with suet. It is very dark in appearance — effectively black — as a result of the dark sugars and black treacle in most recipes, and its long cooking time. The mixture can be moistened with the juice of citrus fruits, brandy and other alcohol (some recipes call for dark beers such as mild, stout or porter).

 

 

A Christmas pudding being flamed after brandy has been poured over it

A Christmas pudding being flamed after brandy has been poured over it

Christmas puddings are often dried out on hooks for weeks prior to serving in order to enhance the flavor. This pudding has been prepared with a traditional cloth rather than a basin.
Prior to the 19th century, the English Christmas pudding was boiled in a pudding cloth, and often represented as round. The new Victorian era fashion involved putting the batter into a basin and then steaming it, followed by unwrapping the pudding, placing it on a platter, and decorating the top with a sprig of holly.

Initial cooking usually involves steaming for many hours. To serve, the pudding is reheated by steaming once more, and dressed with warm brandy which is set alight. It can be eaten with hard sauce, brandy butter, rum butter, cream, lemon cream, ice cream, custard, or sweetened béchamel, and is sometimes sprinkled with caster sugar.

Many families buy their puddings readymade from shops and they can be reheated in a microwave oven with a much shorter cooking time.
Christmas puddings have very good keeping properties and many families keep one back from Christmas to be eaten at another celebration later in the year, often at Easter. Constance Spry records that it was not uncommon to go so far as to make each year’s pudding the previous Christmas.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 24, 2015 at 4:45 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 3 Comments
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Keep soft cookies, cakes, and pancakes deliciously moist by adding a teaspoon of jelly to the batter. You can also add a sugar free pudding cup, that also works.

Diabetic Cake Mix Recipes

December 27, 2014 at 6:36 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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It doesn’t always have to be made from scratch to taste good! So from the Diabetic Living On Line website it’s Diabetic Cake Mix Recipes.

 

 

Diabetic Cake Mix Recipes
When it comes to baking mixes, you don’t have to feel boxed in. Break the mold with these creative and easy sugar-free cake, brownie, and pudding mix recipes.

 

Diabetic living logo

Bake Outside the Box

Baking mixes are quick and easy when you need dessert in a pinch, but that doesn’t mean you have to commit to the instructions on the back of the box — especially if you’re on a diabetes meal plan. Mix it up with one of these creative recipes that start with a simple baking mix and end with a delicious, diabetic dessert.

 

 

 

Chocolate Java Ice Cream Cookies

Sugar-free ice cream nestles between two irresistible mocha cookies in this recipe that begins with a package of sugar-free devil’s food cake mix. Sure to be a new family favorite, the yummy twist on an ice cream sandwich boasts only 127 calories per serving…..

 

 

 

Plum Pudding Cookies

Use lemon-flavor instant pudding mix to make low-carb cookies packed with healthful dried plums and toasted almonds. Cut 6 calories and 2 grams of carb when you make it with a sugar substitute…..

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Diabetic Cake Mix Recipes

 
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/dessert/diabetic-cake-mix-recipes?sssdmh=dm17.775801&esrc=nwdlo122314

A Christmas Favorite – Christmas Pudding

December 19, 2013 at 9:31 AM | Posted in dessert | Leave a comment
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This Christmas pudding is decorated with skimmia rather than holly

This Christmas pudding is decorated with skimmia rather than holly

 

Christmas pudding is a type of pudding traditionally served on Christmas Day (December 25) as part of the Christmas dinner. It has its origins in medieval England, and is sometimes known as plum pudding or Christmas Pudding or just “pud”, though this can also refer to other kinds of boiled pudding involving dried fruit. Despite the name “plum pudding,” the pudding contains no actual plums due to the pre-Victorian use of the word “plums” as a term for raisins. The pudding is composed of many dried fruits and is held together by egg and suet, sometimes moistened by treacle or molasses. Also, flavoured with cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, and other spices. The pudding is aged for a month or even a year. It can age for a long time because it has so much alcohol in it, it never spoils. Plum pudding was also used as a model example by J. J. Thomson, where the cake represented the protons and the plums represented electrons.

 

 

 

Many households have their own recipe for Christmas pudding, some handed down through families for generations. Essentially the recipe brings together what traditionally were expensive or luxurious ingredients — notably the sweet spices that are so important in developing its distinctive rich aroma, and usually made with suet. It is very dark in appearance — effectively black — as a result of the dark sugars and black treacle in most recipes, and its long cooking time. The mixture can be moistened with the juice of citrus fruits, brandy and other alcohol (some recipes call for dark beers such as mild, stout or porter).
Christmas puddings are often dried out on hooks for weeks prior to serving in order to enhance the flavor. This pudding has been prepared with a traditional cloth rather than a basin.
Prior to the 19th century, the English Christmas pudding was boiled in a pudding cloth, and often represented as round. The new Victorian era fashion involved putting the batter into a basin and then steaming it, followed by unwrapping the pudding, placing it on a platter, and decorating the top with a sprig of holly.
Initial cooking usually involves steaming for many hours. To serve, the pudding is reheated by steaming once more, and dressed with warm brandy which is set alight. It can be eaten with hard sauce, brandy butter, rum butter, cream, lemon cream, custard, or sweetened béchamel, and is sometimes sprinkled with caster sugar.

 

 

 

Traditionally, every member of the household stirs the pudding, while making a wish.

Traditionally, every member of the household stirs the pudding, while making a wish.

Traditionally puddings were made on or immediately after the Sunday “next before Advent”, i.e. four to five weeks before Christmas. The collect for that Sunday in the Book of Common Prayer of the Church of England, as it was used from the 16th century (and still is in traditional churches), reads:
“Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people; that they, plenteously bringing forth the fruit of good works, may by thee be plenteously rewarded; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen”
The day became known as “Stir-up Sunday“. Traditionally everyone in the household, or at least every child, gave the mixture a stir and made a wish while doing so.
It was common practice to include small silver coins in the pudding mixture, which could be kept by the person whose serving included them. The usual choice was a silver threepence or a sixpence. The coin was believed to bring wealth in the coming year.
Other tokens are also known to have been included, such as a tiny wishbone (to bring good luck), a silver thimble (for thrift), or an anchor (to symbolise safe harbor).
Once turned out of its basin, decorated with holly, doused in brandy (or occasionally rum), and flamed (or “fired”), the pudding is traditionally brought to the table ceremoniously, and greeted with a round of applause. In 1843, Charles Dickens describes the scene in A Christmas Carol:
“Mrs Cratchit left the room alone — too nervous to bear witnesses — to take the pudding up and bring it in… Hallo! A great deal of steam! The pudding was out of the copper which smells like a washing-day. That was the cloth. A smell like an eating-house and a pastrycook’s next door to each other, with a laundress’s next door to that. That was the pudding. In half a minute Mrs. Cratchit entered — flushed, but smiling proudly — with the pudding, like a speckled cannon-ball, so hard and firm, blazing in half of half-a-quarter of ignited brandy, and bedight with Christmas holly stuck into the top.”

 

 

A Christmas pudding being flamed after brandy has been poured over it.

A Christmas pudding being flamed after brandy has been poured over it.

 

Christmas puddings have very good keeping properties and many families keep one back from Christmas to be eaten at another celebration later in the year, often at Easter. Constance Spry records that it was not uncommon to go so far as to make each year’s pudding the previous Christmas.

 

 

Pumpkin Pudding

October 31, 2013 at 9:28 AM | Posted in baking, dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly | Leave a comment
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There’s always room for Pudding. Especially when its Diabetic Friendly! From the Diabetic Gourmet web site which is stocked full of healthy and Diabetic Friendly recipes and ideas, the link is at the bottom of the page. Enjoy and Happy Halloween!

 

 

Pumpkin Pudding

Yield: 4 servings.
Serving size: 1/2 cup

Ingredients

1 (16 oz.) can pumpkin
2 cup skim milk
2 eggs
1 tsp. cinnamon
Dash of salt
1 tsp. vanilla
4 to 5 packets of sugar substitute, or to taste

Directions

Preheat oven to 425F.
Blend all ingredients.
Spoon into a casserole bowl
Bake at 425F for 15 minutes.
Lower heat to 350F and bake another 40 minutes
Garnish with chopped walnuts, if desired.
Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 125 ; Protein: 8 g ; Fat: 3 g ; Sodium: 140 mg;
Cholesterol: 96 mg ; Dietary Fiber: 3.5 g ; Carbohydrates: 16 g

 

http://diabeticgourmet.com/recipes/Holidays_and_Special_Occasions/Halloween/

Diabetic Lemon Cake Delight

September 12, 2011 at 2:46 PM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, fruits, low calorie, low carb | Leave a comment
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Ingredients

* 1 purchased Sugarless Angel Food Cake
* 1 box (4-serving size) Lemon Instant Sugar-Free Pudding
* ½ cup Skim Milk
* 1 carton (8-ounce) Lemon-Flavored non-fat, no-sugar-added Yogurt
* ½ carton (8-ounce) “Lite” Frozen Whipped Topping, thawed

How to make it

* Cut angel food cake in half, horizontally, using serrated knife in a sawing motion. Place bottom layer on serving plate.
* Beat pudding with milk until thickened, about 1 minute. Stir in yogurt.
* Fold thawed reduced-calorie whipped topping into pudding mixture.
* Frost bottom layer of cake with lemon mixture. You may then place top layer on cake and frost with remaining mixture, or make a second cake with remaining topping mixture. Chill until served.

Top 25 Diabetic Snacks

July 23, 2011 at 12:48 PM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, low calorie, low carb, snacks | Leave a comment
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Another interesting article from  http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com This one on everyone’s favorite Snacks! I’ll be showing one of the top rated ones each day.So if your going to snack make it one of these. Hope you find it interesting.

Top 25 Diabetic Snacks

by Marsha McCulloch, R.D., L.D., and Laura Marzen, R.D., L.D.
Stomach grumbling or blood glucose a bit low? Reach for one of our top 25 consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved snacks. Diabetic Living’s dietitians scoured the supermarkets to find the most nutritious packaged snacks, and a panel of taste-testers (including people with diabetes) ranked the treats. From chips and dip to cookies and popcorn, see which snacks were awarded the Diabetic Living What to Eat Seal of Approval.

How These Snacks Made the List

Selecting smart between-meal munchies is simple if you’re satisfied with a basic banana or apple. But sometimes our taste buds scream for something a little more fun and flavorful.

How we chose the best snacks:
1. Diabetic Living’s dietitians scoured the supermarkets to find the most nutritious packaged snacks in 25 different categories.
2. In a rigorous taste test, an average of 50 people, including people with diabetes, sampled each snack (with the brand concealed), picking the best among three choices in each category.
3. Based on their ratings, we’ve awarded the top 25 snacks the Diabetic Living What to Eat Seal of Approval.

Read on to see all the winners and honorable mentions. At the end, get a FREE two-page guide featuring the winners that you can print at home!

Best Pudding Snack Pack

Winner: Jell-O Sugar-Free Pudding Snacks, Chocolate Vanilla Swirl (jello.com)

Why it won: Can’t decide between chocolate and vanilla? These creamy, refrigerated pudding snacks will satisfy both cravings with just 60 calories. Plus, each serving provides 10 percent of your daily calcium needs.

Taste-tester’s quote: “I love the wonderful flavor and texture.”

Nutrition facts per 3.75-ounce carton:

* 60 cal.
* 12 g carb.
* 1.5 g total fat (1 g sat. fat)
* 2 g pro.
* 180 mg sodium
* <1 g fiber

Honorable mention:

* Hunt’s Sugar-Free Chocolate Pudding
* Jell-O Sugar-Free Cinnamon Roll Pudding

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/food-to-eat/nutrition/top-diabetic-snacks/?page=1

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