Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Saltimbocca Turkey Burger

September 6, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | 1 Comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is a Saltimbocca Turkey Burger. Made using JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Burger Patties along with Mayo, Garlic, Lemon Juice, Baby Spinach, Prosciutto, Roasted Red Pepper Strips, and all served on a Split and Toasted Ciabatta Roll. The Burger is only 310 calories and 18 net carbs! You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

Saltimbocca Turkey Burger
This tasty Italian burger recipe takes a lean turkey patty and dresses it up in garlic and lemon juice, tops it with veggies and prosciutto and still keeps it under 300 calories per serving. Classy!

INGREDIENTS
1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Burger Patties
⅓ cup fat-free mayonnaise
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon lemon juice
4 ciabatta rolls, split and toasted
1 cup baby spinach leaves
2 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto
½ cup roasted red pepper strips, drained

DIRECTIONS
1) Cook turkey patties as specified on package. Always cook to well done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer.
2) In small bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, garlic and lemon juice. Spread on both cut sides of each roll.
3) Place turkey patties on bottom halves of rolls.
4) Top with baby spinach, prosciutto and red pepper. Cover with roll tops.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 310
Protein 29g
Carbohydrates 21g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 3g
Fat 12g
Cholesterol 95mg
Sodium 680mg
Saturated Fat 3.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/787-saltimbocca-turkey-burger

Sunday’s Chicken Dinner Recipe – Golden Tuscan Chicken

May 12, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Sunday's Chicken Dinner | Leave a comment
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This week’s Sunday’s Chicken Dinner Recipe is – Golden Tuscan Chicken. You’ll be using Boneless and Skinless Chicken Breasts along with Thyme, Oregano, Cauliflower, Prosciutto, Pine Nuts, Green Beans, Olives, and Seasoning. You can find this recipe at the CooksRecipes website along with all the other many delicious recipes! So check it out today. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Golden Tuscan Chicken

Recipe Ingredients:
4 (6-ounce) boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 tablespoon chopped thyme
1 tablespoon chopped oregano
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
2 tablespoons olive oil
12 ounces (4 cups) cauliflowerets, quartered and blanched
1 ounce sliced prosciutto, chopped
2 tablespoons pine nuts
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
6 ounces green beans, trimmed and blanched
1 cup olives, whole, pitted
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Cooking Directions:
1 – Season chicken breasts with 2 teaspoon of thyme and oregano and 1/2 teaspoon of salt.
2 – Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium high heat. Place chicken breasts in pan and brown for 2 to 3 minutes. Flip over and brown for 2 more minutes. Transfer chicken to a high sided baking sheet and cook in a 450°F (230°C) oven for 8 minutes or until cooked through.
3 – While chicken is roasting, heat remaining oil in sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add cauliflower and cook for 2 to 3 minutes until golden, stirring occasionally. Turn heat down to medium-low, add prosciutto, pine nuts and garlic and continue cooking for 1 to 2 minutes. Toss in green beans, olives, lemon juice and pepper. Cover and cook for 2 minutes until heated through.
4 – Place 5 to 6 ounces of vegetable mixture onto each serving plate. Top with chicken and serve hot.

Makes 4 servings.

https://www.cooksrecipes.com/chicken/golden_tuscan_chicken_recipe.html

Lunch Meat of the Week – Prosciutto

November 1, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Lunch Meat of the Week | 2 Comments
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Prosciutto

Prosciutto (/prəˈʃuːtoʊ/, Italian: [proʃˈʃutto]) is an Italian dry-cured ham that is usually thinly sliced and served uncooked; this style is called prosciutto crudo in Italian (or simply crudo) and is distinguished from cooked ham, prosciutto cotto.

A number of regions have their own variations of prosciutto, each with degrees of protected status, but the most prized are the Prosciutto di Parma PDO from the Emilia-Romagna region and the Prosciutto di San Daniele PDO from the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region. Another notable type is Speck Alto Adige PGI from the South Tyrol region.

The names prosciutto and prosciutto crudo are generic, and not protected designations, and may name or describe a variety of hams more or less similar to Italian prosciutto crudo or other dry-cured hams worldwide.

 

 

 

 

Prosciutto is made from either a pig’s or a wild boar’s hind leg or thigh, and the base term prosciutto specifically refers to this product. Prosciutto may also be made using the hind leg of other

Prosciutto di Parma

animals, in which case the name of the animal is included in the name of the product, for example “prosciutto cotto d’agnello” (“lamb prosciutto”). The process of making prosciutto can take from nine months to two years, depending on the size of the ham.

A writer on Italian food, Bill Buford, describes talking to an old Italian butcher who says:

When I was young, there was one kind of prosciutto. It was made in the winter, by hand, and aged for two years. It was sweet when you smelled it. A profound perfume. Unmistakable. To age a prosciutto is a subtle business. If it’s too warm, the aging process never begins. The meat spoils. If it’s too dry, the meat is ruined. It needs to be damp but cool. The summer is too hot. In the winter—that’s when you make salumi. Your prosciutto. Your soppressata. Your sausages.

Today, the ham is first cleaned, salted, and left for about two months. During this time, the ham is pressed, gradually and carefully so as to avoid breaking the bone, to drain all blood left in the meat. Next, it is washed several times to remove the salt, and is hung in a dark, well-ventilated environment. The surrounding air is important to the final quality of the ham; the best results are obtained in a cold climate. The ham is then left until dry. The time this takes varies, depending on the local climate and size of the ham. When the ham is completely dry, it is hung to air, either at room temperature or in a controlled environment, for up to 18 months.

Prosciutto is sometimes cured with nitrites (either sodium or potassium), which are generally used in other hams to produce the desired rosy color and unique flavor, but only sea salt is used in Protected Designation of Origin hams. Such rosy pigmentation is produced by a direct chemical reaction of nitric oxide with myoglobin to form nitrosomyoglobin, followed by concentration of the pigments due to drying. Bacteria convert the added nitrite or nitrate to nitric oxide.

 

 

Antipasto with Prosciutto

Sliced prosciutto crudo in Italian cuisine is often served as an antipasto, wrapped around grissini, or accompanied with melon. It is also eaten as accompaniment to cooked spring vegetables, such as asparagus or peas. It may be included in a simple pasta sauce made with cream, or a Tuscan dish of tagliatelle and vegetables. It is used in stuffings for other meats, such as veal, as a wrap around veal or steak, in a filled bread, or as a pizza topping.

Saltimbocca is an Italian veal dish, where escalopes of veal are topped with a sage leaf before being wrapped in prosciutto and then pan-fried. Prosciutto is often served in sandwiches and panini, sometimes in a variation on the Caprese salad, with basil, tomato and fresh mozzarella. A basic sandwich served in some European cafés and bars consists of prosciutto in a croissant.

 

Eat to Beat Diabetes: Diabetic Breakfasts That Boost Your Energy

January 13, 2017 at 7:06 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website – Eat to Beat Diabetes: Diabetic Breakfasts That Boost Your Energy. Start the day off right with these delicious and healthy recipes. Recipes like; Sausage and Sweet Pepper Hash, Bacon-Cheese Breakfast Casserole, and Asparagus, Prosciutto and Arugula Breakfast Sandwiches. Find these and more at one of my favorite recipe sites, Diabetic Living Online. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2017! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

 

Eat to Beat Diabetes: Diabetic Breakfasts That Boost Your EnergyDiabetic living logo

Kick-start your day with diabetes-friendly breakfast recipes that are packed with nutrition and satisfaction. Enjoy healthy breakfast sandwiches, superfood smoothies, omelets, yogurt parfaits, and more.

 

 

Sausage and Sweet Pepper Hash

This slow cooker diabetic breakfast recipe is perfect for a weekend brunch. Fuel up for the day with a delicious low-carb hash mixture featuring chicken sausage, sweet peppers, and Swiss cheese. Complete the meal with a side of eggs….

 
Bacon-Cheese Breakfast Casserole

Quit denying yourself a home-style meal because of diabetes. This slow cooker breakfast recipe has just 25 grams of carb per serving so you can indulge without the guilt…..

 
Asparagus, Prosciutto and Arugula Breakfast Sandwiches

Take your go-to breakfast sandwich to the next level. Delicate prosciutto replaces traditional bacon, sausage, or ham, while arugula, asparagus, and a drizzle of maple syrup add sweet and savory flavors and are served on our homemade cheddar biscuits……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Eat to Beat Diabetes: Diabetic Breakfasts That Boost Your Energy
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/breakfast/eat-to-beat-diabetes-diabetic-breakfasts-boost-your-energy

Cheese of the Week – Parmesan

September 27, 2012 at 9:34 AM | Posted in cheese, cooking, Food | 2 Comments
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Parmesan cheese is the name of a few kinds of Italian extra-hard cheeses. It is usually the cheese to go with Spaghetti and other typical

Parmesan cheese (Parmigiano Reggiano)

Italian pasta, but it also has many other uses. Parmesan is a part of Italian national cuisine and is usually grated.
Usually, Parmesan cheese is either Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano cheese. Both cheeses are AOC. This means that the way they are made, and the region they come from are strictly regulated.
Only these brands (Parmigiano Reggiano, Grana Padano) are protected. In many parts of the world, cheese is sold as Parmesan cheese that has nothing to do with the true (Italian) Parmigiano Reggiano or Grana Padano. The biggest producers of such cheeses are the United States and Argentina.
The original Parmesan cheese is one of the most expensive cheeses in the world.

 
Parmigiano-Reggiano

Country of origin Italy
Region, town Provinces of Parma,
Reggio Emilia, Modena,
Bologna (west of the Reno),
Mantua (south of the Po River)
Source of milk Cows
Pasteurised No
Texture Hard
Aging time Minimum: 12 months
Vecchio: 18–24 months
Stravecchio: 24–36 months
Certification Italy: DOP 1955
EU: PDO 1992

Parmigiano-Reggiano also known in English as Parmesan is a hard, granular cheese, cooked but not pressed, named after the producing areas near Parma, Reggio Emilia, Modena, and Bologna (all in Emilia-Romagna), and Mantova (in Lombardia), Italy. Under Italian law, only cheese produced in these provinces may be labelled “Parmigiano-Reggiano”, while European law classifies the name as a protected designation of origin.
Parmigiano is the Italian adjective for Parma. Reggiano is the Italian adjective for Reggio Emilia. Parmesan is the French name for it and also serves as the informal term for the cheese in the English language. The name Parmesan is also used for cheeses which imitate Parmigiano-Reggiano, with phrases such as “Italian hard cheese” adopted to skirt legal constraints. The closest legitimate Italian cheese to Parmigiano-Reggiano is Grana Padano.

Parmigiano-Reggiano is made from raw cow’s milk. The whole milk of the morning milking is mixed with the naturally skimmed milk (it

Parmigiano-Reggiano factory

is left in large shallow tanks to allow the cream to separate) of the previous evening’s milking, resulting in a part skim mixture. The milk is pumped into copper-lined vats (copper heats and cools quickly). Starter whey is added, and the temperature is raised to 33–35 °C (91–95 °F). Calf rennet is added, and the mixture is left to curdle for 10–12 minutes. The curd is then broken up mechanically into small pieces (around the size of rice grains). The temperature is then raised to 55 °C (131 °F) with careful control by the cheese-maker. The curd is left to settle for 45–60 minutes. The compacted curd is collected in a piece of muslin before being divided in two and placed in molds. There is 1100 L (291 US gallons or 250 imperial gallons) of milk per vat, producing two cheeses each. The curd making up each wheel at this point weighs around 45 kg (100 lb). The remaining whey in the vat was traditionally used to feed the pigs from which “Prosciutto di Parma” (cured Parma ham) was produced. The barns for these animals were usually just a few yards away from the cheese production rooms.
The cheese is put into a stainless steel, round form that is pulled tight with a spring-powered buckle so the cheese retains its wheel shape. After a day or two, the buckle is released and a plastic belt imprinted numerous times with the Parmigiano-Reggiano name, the plant’s number, and month and year of production is put around the cheese and the metal form is buckled tight again. The imprints take hold on the rind of the cheese in about a day and the wheel is then put into a brine bath to absorb salt for 20–25 days. After brining, the wheels are then transferred to the aging rooms in the plant for 12 months. Each cheese is placed on wooden shelves that can be 24 cheeses high by 90 cheeses long or about 4,000 total wheels per aisle. Each cheese and the shelf underneath it is then cleaned manually or robotically every seven days. The cheese is also turned at this time.

At 12 months, the Consorzio Parmigiano-Reggiano inspects each and every cheese. The cheese is tested by a master grader whose only instruments are a hammer and his ear. By tapping the wheel at various points, he can identify undesirable cracks and voids within the wheel. Those cheeses that pass the test are then heat branded on the rind with the Consorzio’s logo. Those that do not pass the test used to have their rinds marked with lines or crosses all the way around to inform consumers that they are not getting top-quality Parmigiano-Reggiano; more recent practices simply have these lesser rinds stripped of all markings.
Traditionally, cows have to be fed only on grass or hay, producing grass fed milk. Only natural whey culture is allowed as a starter, together with calf rennet.
The only additive allowed is salt, which the cheese absorbs while being submerged for 20 days in brine tanks saturated to near total salinity with Mediterranean sea salt. The product is aged an average of two years. The cheese is produced daily, and it can show a natural variability. True Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese has a sharp, complex fruity/nutty taste with a strong savory flavor and a slightly gritty texture. Inferior versions can impart a bitter taste.
The average Parmigiano-Reggiano wheel is about 18–24 centimeters (7.1–9.4 in) high, 40–45 centimeters (16–18 in) in diameter, and weighs 38 kilograms (84 lb).

Parmigiano-Reggiano is commonly grated over pasta dishes, stirred into soups and risottos, and eaten on its own. It is often shaved or grated over other dishes.
Slivers and chunks of the hardest parts of the crust are sometimes simmered in soup. They can also be just roasted and eaten as a snack.
The hollowed-out crust of a whole wheel of Parmigiano can be used as a serving pot for large groups.

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