One of America’s Favorites – American Cheese

December 21, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Modern American cheese is a type of processed cheese made from cheddar, Colby, or similar cheeses. It is mild with a creamy and salty flavor, has a medium-firm consistency, and has a low

An individually wrapped slice of American cheese, also known as a ‘single’.

melting point. It can be yellow or white in color; yellow American cheese is seasoned and colored with annatto. It originated in the 1910s.

 

British colonists made cheddar cheese soon after their arrival in North America. By 1790, American-made cheddars were being exported back to England. According to Robert Carlton Brown, author of The Complete Book of Cheese, “The English called our imitation Yankee, or American, Cheddar, while here at home it was popularly known as yellow or store cheese”.

The Oxford English Dictionary lists the first known usage of “American cheese” as occurring in the Frankfort, Kentucky, newspaper The Guardian of Freedom in 1804. The next usage given is in 1860 by Charles Dickens in his series The Uncommercial Traveler.

After patenting a new method for manufacturing processed cheese in 1916, James L. Kraft began marketing it in the late 1910s, and the term “American cheese” rapidly began to refer to the processed variety instead of the traditional but more expensive cheddars also made and sold in the U.S.

 

Traditional cheese is ground, combined with emulsifying agents and other ingredients, mixed and heated until it forms a “melted homogeneous” mixture. To pasteurize it, the cheese mixture must be heated to a temperature of at least 150 °F (66 °C) for a minimum of 30 seconds. Composition requirements of processed American cheese control the percentage of milkfat, moisture, salt and pH value in the final product, along with specifications for flavor, body and texture, color, and meltability.

The cheeseburger is a popular food in North America and elsewhere (shown topped with American cheese).

Processed American cheese is packaged in individually wrapped slices, as unwrapped slices sold in stacks, or in unsliced blocks. Individually wrapped slices are formed from processed cheese which solidifies only between the wrapping medium; these slices, sold as “singles”, are typically the least like traditional cheese. Blocks of American cheese are more similar to traditional cheese, and are sliced to order at deli counters.

 

Americans purchased about $2.77 billion worth of American cheese in 2018, but the popularity was falling, and, according to Bloomberg News, sales were projected to drop 1.6% in 2018. The average price for a pound of American was below $4 for the first time since 2011.

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – American Cheese

October 7, 2013 at 9:25 AM | Posted in cheese, One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,
Wrapped slices of American processed cheese

Wrapped slices of American processed cheese

 

American cheese is a processed cheese. It is orange, yellow, or white in color and mild in flavor, with a medium-firm consistency, and melts easily. American cheese was originally only white, but is often now modified to yellow. In the past, it was made from a blend of cheeses, most often Colby and Cheddar. Today’s American cheese is generally no longer made from blended cheeses, but instead is manufactured from a set of ingredients such as milk, whey, milkfat, milk protein concentrate, whey protein concentrate, and salt. In the United States, it may not be legally sold as “cheese”, and must be labeled as “processed cheese”, “cheese product”, or similar—e.g., “cheese food”. At times even the word “cheese” is missing in the name on the label, e.g. “American slices” or “American singles“. In Canada, exactly the same product, often by the same manufacturer with the same label design, used to be sold as “Canadian cheese” or “Canadian slices”. Today, most such product in Canada is vaguely labelled just “slices” or “singles”. In the United Kingdom, packs are labelled as “singles”, although it is commonly called cheese slices.
The marketing label “American Cheese” for processed cheese combined with the prevalence of processed cheese in the U.S compared to the rest of the world has led to the term American cheese being used in the U.S. synonymously in place of processed cheese in America. The term “American cheese” has a legal definition as a type of pasteurized processed cheese under the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations.
American cheese is used in American cuisine, for example on cheeseburgers, in grilled cheese sandwiches, and in macaroni and cheese.

 

 

British colonists made cheddar soon upon their arrival in America. By 1790, American cheddars were being exported back to England. The British referred to American cheddar as “American cheese”, or “Yankee cheese”, and post-Revolution Americans promoted this usage to distinguish their product from European cheese. For example, an 1878 newspaper article in The New York Times lists the total export of American cheese at 355 million pounds per year, with an expected growth to 1,420 million pounds.
After the invention of processed cheese in 1911, and its popularization by James L. Kraft in the late 1910s and 1920s, the term “American cheese” rapidly began to refer to this variety rather than to American cheddar. The latter had already begun to be produced on an industrial scale in the 1890s, leading to the term “factory cheese”. And in the 1920s another slang term arose for the still-popular cheese: “rattrap cheese”, or “rat cheese”.
The Oxford English Dictionary defines American cheese as a “cheese of cheddar type, made in the U.S.” and lists 1804 as the first known usage of “American cheese”, occurring in the Frankfort, Kentucky newspaper Guardian of Freedom. The next usage given is in 1860 by Charles Dickens in his series The Noncommercial Traversal.

 

 

Even though the term “American cheese” has a legal definition in the United States as a type of pasteurized processed cheese, products called “American cheese” are by no means identical. Depending on the additives and the amounts of milk fat and water added to the cheese during emulsification, the taste and texture of American cheese varies, with some varieties (e.g. “American cheese” and “American processed cheese”) being very similar to non-processed cheese and other varieties (e.g. “American cheese food” and “American cheese product”) being more like Velveeta or Cheez Whiz.
The taste and texture of different varieties of American cheese vary considerably, and mostly depend on the percentage of cheese versus additives used during emulsification. Varieties with lower percentages of additives tend to taste more like unprocessed cheese. Depending on the food manufacturer, the color of the cheese (orange, yellow, or white) may indicate different ingredients or processes. Some manufacturers reserve the white and yellow colors for their less processed (i.e. fewer additives) American cheese varieties. In other cases, the ingredients for white and orange colors are the same, except for the coloring.
The processed variety of American cheese is sold in three basic packaging varieties: individually wrapped cheese slices (which technically are not slices, sliced off a block of cheese, but rather slabs of processed cheese which are formed from a viscous processed cheese which only solidifies between the wrapping medium), small pre-sliced blocks of 8 to 36 slices, and large blocks meant for deli counters. The individually wrapped cheese slices are typically the least like unprocessed cheese. Small (e.g., 8- to 36-slice) blocks of pre-sliced, but not individually wrapped American cheese are also marketed, often with the branding “deluxe” or “old-fashioned”. This variety of American cheese is similar in ingredients and texture to that of modern block American cheese. Before the advent of the individually wrapped variety, this was the typical variety that Americans purchased. Hence, some people refer to this as “classic” or “traditional” American cheese.

 

 

This is a list of cheeses typical of the United States. The list excludes specific brand names, unless a brand name is also a distinct variety of cheese. Many additional European-type cheeses are also made in the United States, such as Brie, Cheddar, Gouda, mozzarella and provolone. Also, many local dairies throughout the country produce artisan cheeses and other more localized flavors. (Note that the term “American cheese” is also used to refer to the technology of processed cheese). Many American cheese varieties are related to European cheeses, with slightly different recipes, and with European-sounding names, such as Swiss cheese, which is not normally found or produced in Switzerland. Almost half of the cheese produced in the United States comes from Wisconsin and California.

 

 

List of American cheeses

Bergenost cheese

Bergenost cheese

* Bergenost
* Brick cheese
* Caprizella, goat cheese, made in Washington State
* Cheese curds, also common in Canada
* Colby cheese
* Colby-Jack cheese
* Cougar Gold cheese
* Cream cheese
* Creole cream cheese
* Cup Cheese
* Farmer cheese
* Hoop cheese, drier version of farmer cheese
* Humboldt Fog, made in California
* Kunik cheese
* Liederkranz cheese
* Maytag Blue cheese, brand name which is also a distinct variety of cheese
* Monterey Jack
* Pepper jack cheese, variety of Monterey Jack
* Muenster cheese
* Pinconning cheese, an aged variety of Colby
* Red Hawk cheese, a triple-crème cow’s milk cheese with a brine washed rind, made in California
* String cheese, the particular American variety of Mozzarella with a stringy texture
* Swiss cheese
* Teleme cheese

A package of brick cheese

A package of brick cheese

Processed cheeses

* American cheese, a processed cheese food, not technically a cheese
* Government cheese, variety of processed cheese food
* Provel cheese
* Velveeta, brand name for a softer style of processed cheese than American cheese

 

 

Cheese of the Week – American Cheese

March 13, 2012 at 2:58 PM | Posted in cheese, Food | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

American Cheese is smooth, with light, yellow or orange color. The cheese is usually cut into square slices and it does not separate when melted. It has a mild taste.

Country: United States

Texture: semi-soft

American cheese is a processed cheese. It is orange, yellow, or white in color and mild in flavor, with a medium-firm consistency, and melts easily. American cheese was originally only white, but is usually now modified to yellow. In the past it was made from a blend of cheeses, most

American processed cheese (wrapped slices)

often Colby and Cheddar. Today’s American cheese is generally no longer made from blended cheeses, but instead is manufactured from a set of ingredients such as milk, whey, milkfat, milk protein concentrate, whey protein concentrate, and salt. In the United States it may not be legally sold as “cheese”, and must be labeled as “processed cheese”, “cheese product”, or similar–e.g., “cheese food”. At times even the word “cheese” is missing in the name on the label, e.g. “American slices” or “American singles“. In Canada, the exact same product, often by the same manufacturer with the same label design, used to be sold as “Canadian cheese” or “Canadian slices”. Today most such cheese in Canada is vaguely labelled just “slices” or “singles”. In the United Kingdom, packs are labelled as “singles”, although it is commonly called “plastic cheese”.

The marketing label “American cheese” for processed cheese combined with the prevalence of processed cheese in the U.S. compared to the rest of the world has led to the term American cheese being used in the U.S. synonymously in place of processed cheese. The term “American cheese” has a legal definition as a type of pasteurized processed cheese under the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations.

American cheese is used in American cuisine, for example on cheeseburgers, in grilled cheese sandwiches, and in macaroni and cheese.

British colonists made cheddar as soon as they arrived in America. By 1790, American cheddars were being exported back to England. The British referred to American cheddar as “American cheese”, or “Yankee cheese”, and post-Revolution Americans promoted this usage to distinguish their product from European cheese. For example, an 1878 newspaper article in The New York Times lists the total export of American cheese at 355 million pounds per year, with an expected growth to 1,420 million pounds.

Originally, the English considered American cheese inferior in quality; still, it was cheap, so it sold. This connotation of the term American cheese became entrenched in Europe. “American cheese” continued to refer to American cheddar until the advent of processed cheese. Americans referred to their cheddar as “yellow cheese” or “store cheese”, because of its popularity and availability. By the 1890s, once cheese factories had sprung up across the nation, American cheddar was also referred to as “factory cheese”. And in the 1920s another slang term arose for the still popular cheese: “rattrap cheese”, or “rat cheese”.

The Oxford English Dictionary defines American cheese as a “cheese of cheddar type, made in the U.S.” and lists 1804 as the first known usage of “American cheese”, occurring in the Frankfort, Kentucky newspaper Guardian of Freedom. The next usage given is in 1860 by Charles Dickens in his series The Uncommercial Traveller.

Even though the term “American cheese” has a legal definition in the United States as a type of pasteurized processed cheese, products called “American cheese” are by no means identical. Depending on the additives and the amounts of milk fat and water added to the cheese during emulsification, the taste and texture of American cheese varies, with some varieties (e.g. “American cheese” and “American processed cheese”) being very similar to non-processed cheese and other varieties (e.g. “American cheese food” and “American cheese product”) being more like Velveeta or Cheez Whiz. The interested consumer should pay close attention to the wording used on the label of each product and to the ingredient list. (Refer to the definitions in the Sale and labeling section of the article on Processed cheese.)

The taste and texture of different varieties of American cheese vary considerably, and mostly depend on the percentage of cheese versus additives used during emulsification. Varieties with lower percentages of additives tend to taste more like unprocessed cheese. Depending on the food manufacturer, the color of the cheese (orange, yellow, or white) may indicate different ingredients or processes. Some manufacturers reserve the white and yellow colors for their less processed[citation needed] (i.e. fewer additives) American cheese varieties. In other cases[citation needed], the ingredients for white and orange colors are the same, except for the coloring. However, this does not necessarily mean that even these white and orange cheeses have exactly the same flavor and texture because the spice annatto, which has a subtle but noticeable taste, is often used for coloring American Cheese.

The processed variety of American cheese is sold in three basic packaging varieties: individually wrapped cheese slices, small pre-sliced blocks of 8 to 36 slices, and large blocks meant for deli counters. The individually wrapped cheese slices are typically the least like unprocessed cheese. Small (e.g., 8- to 36-slice) blocks of pre-sliced, but not individually wrapped American cheese are also marketed, often with the branding “deluxe” or “old-fashioned”. This variety of American cheese is similar in ingredients and texture to that of modern block American cheese. Before the advent of the individually wrapped variety, this was the typical variety that Americans purchased. Hence, some people refer to this as “classic” or “traditional” American cheese. American cheese in block form sold at deli counters is typically a less processed cheese than its individually wrapped cousin. Nonetheless, most block American cheese is still a processed cheese.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

RL WEB

MAKING LIFE BETTER

Uncle Mitch Cooks

Food is tasty, let's make some

the warrior doc

undo your pain and walk in victory

Salad Gardener

An amateur food blog of the vegetarian/pescatarian persuasion.

Incredible Mommy

Sharing bits of everything - Motherhood, lifestyle and life with baby

Cook Share and Feast

Sri Lankan & Recipes Around the World

Me As Mom 🌍🥾👒

Bringing Mommy Positivity One Laugh At A Time

Food With Nat

Keeping it simple, cheap & healthy, but also super flavoursome!

Mitchell Meals

Family recipes from the Mitchells and more

K and M Kitchen Adventures

Exploring the world through our kitchen

simple thriving life

everyday life. everyday joy.

#dinnergrams

Just a home chef sharing recipes with tidbits of #mombosslife and my ever changing hair color.

Diet Mango

Discover and Eat Better!

Confinement Kitchen

Inspired by all my time at home during the pandemic, I decided to create @confinemnt_kitchn. Here are some of my original recipes and the stories behind them. Enjoy!