One of America’s Favorites – Beer Can Chicken

April 18, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Beer can chicken (also known as chicken on a throne, beer butt chicken, Coq au can, dancing chicken) is a barbecued chicken dish and method of indirect grilling using a partially-filled can of beer that is placed in the chicken’s cavity prior to cooking. The chicken is then stood up on the can and its legs vertically, and slow-cooked over indirect heat, usually over a propane gas or charcoal grill. The process is meant to add moisture to the dish, and some believe that steam from the beer serves to steam the chicken from the inside and add flavor to the dish. Some people are avid proponents of the dish, while others have contended that the efficacy of using the beer is overrated, and that the science regarding beer can chicken is debatable. It has been suggested that the dish possibly originated in the U.S. state of Louisiana.

Beer can chicken is a barbecued chicken dish and method of indirect grilling, in which an open can of beer or other canned beverage is inserted into the cavity of a chicken and then used to hold the chicken vertically while it cooks on a grill or in an oven. During the cooking process the beer in the can might steam, which might add moisture in the cavity of the bird, and some theorize that the beer vapor serves to add flavor to the dish. Because the chicken is in an upright position, the fat in the bird drains away and the skin is evenly cooked.

Prior to cooking, some of the beer in the can is typically removed, with a partially-full can of beer placed inside the bird’s cavity. Some cooks use a full can of beer. Some cooks use a standard 12-ounce beer can, while others use a tallboy beer can, a larger-sized can. The chicken is sometimes coated with a spice rub prior to cooking, and some use marinated chicken.

Some people are enthusiastic proponents of the dish, while others feel that the dish and process is overrated. It has been stated that the efficacy of the beer serving to steam whole chickens from the inside and adding flavor is debatable. Some critics of beer can chicken exist; one critic referred to the practice as “dangerous” and “a waste of good beer”. Another critic stated that the process may actually make the chicken drier compared to other types of roasting, and it has also been stated by some cooking experts that the beer does not reach a boiling point, and therefore does not steam.

Barbecue author Steven Raichlen helped popularize the dish on a global level. He has promoted the dish since 1996, when he first observed its preparation in the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. He has suggested that beer can chicken likely originated in the U.S. state of Louisiana. Raichlen has reported recipes for beer can chicken appearing around the same time in Mississippi, Texas, and Kansas. “There is a definite Louisiana connection.” Famous Barbecue Judge Ardie Davis compared the emergence of Beer Can Chicken to the domestication of animals: “It just happened everywhere at once.”

Beer-Can Chicken may have been prepared throughout the American South in the 1980’s; however, the first documentation can be found in the Houston Chronicle in 1993. The recipe was given by Wayne Whitworth to George H. W. Bush when he and his brothers built a barbecue for the president. The barbecue pits were sent to Camp David at the beginning of President Bush’s term.

In October 2014, Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen purveyed a limited edition beer can chicken dish that was produced without the use of beer. The dish consisted of sliced chicken breast meat marinated in a spice mixture designed to mimic the flavor of beer can chicken, which was then battered and deep fried. The spice mixture was composed of butter, onion, garlic, rosemary, lemon zest, cayenne pepper and a “secret ingredient” that Popeyes did not disclose. The company’s chief marketing officer stated to a press source that the company had “… been working on the Beer Can Chicken for years”.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 18, 2022 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Storing raw chicken…..

Store fresh, uncooked chicken on a low shelf of the refrigerator so it does not drip onto other items. For convenience and to prevent freezer burn, wrap separate pieces in foil or plastic bags. Then place all wrapped or bagged pieces into a larger freezer bag or foil wrap.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

February 27, 2022 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Healthier Poultry…..

Use healthier fats. The best are unsaturated varieties like cold-pressed olive, rapeseed or sunflower oil. Then when cooking chicken or turkey, you can cut way back on fat and calories by simply removing the skin.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

February 11, 2022 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 3 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Wrap and Save…..

Buy a whole package of meat or poultry and wrap individual portions in freezer-safe paper; label each with the date and contents.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 24, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Flour and Chill…..

After flouring chicken, chill for 1 hour. The coating adheres better during frying.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 10, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Whole Roast Chicken……

When making a whole roast chicken, salt it, then chill it, uncovered, in the fridge for the day. This helps season the bird and dries out the skin so it crisps perfectly when cooked. Remove it from the fridge an hour before you plan to put it in the oven, and add herbs and aromatics like garlic or shallots.
*Thank you to Carrie L. for passing this hint a long

Healthy Chicken Legs Recipes

November 9, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Chicken Legs Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Chicken Legs Recipes with recipes including Oven-Baked Chicken Drumsticks with Potatoes, Filipino Chicken Adobo, and Oven-Fried Parmesan Chicken Drumsticks. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Chicken Legs Recipes
Find healthy, delicious chicken legs recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Oven-Baked Chicken Drumsticks with Potatoes
Use your favorite dried herb blend to season both the drumsticks and the sauce in this healthy sheet-pan dinner. A garlic-and-herb mix is crowd-pleasing, but something with a little more heat, like Cajun seasoning, would be delicious too. Whichever way you go, opt for a salt-free version to keep the sodium down in this quick and easy chicken recipe……

Filipino Chicken Adobo
Perhaps the most famous dish in the Filipino repertoire, chicken adobo has as many versions as there are cooks in the Philippines. Some recipes omit garlic, others add coconut milk, some feature brothy sauce, and others reduce that liquid to an intense glaze. Try this healthy recipe first (with plenty of white rice), then the next time around, go wild……

Oven-Fried Parmesan Chicken Drumsticks
These chicken drumsticks are coated in breadcrumbs with oregano, paprika, and pepper and are oven cooked rather than deep-fried. This recipe is incredibly easy to prepare, making it a perfect party appetizer for any occasion……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Chicken Legs Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19157/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/legs/

One of America’s Favorites – Turkey

November 8, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A roast turkey prepared for a traditional U.S. Thanksgiving meal. The white plastic object in the breast is a pop-up thermometer.

Turkey meat, commonly referred to as just turkey, is the meat from turkeys, typically domesticated turkeys but also wild turkeys. It is a popular poultry dish, especially in North America, where it is traditionally consumed as part of culturally significant events such as Thanksgiving and Christmas, as well as in standard cuisine.

Turkeys are sold sliced and ground, as well as “whole” in a manner similar to chicken with the head, feet, and feathers removed. Frozen whole turkeys remain popular. Sliced turkey is frequently used as a sandwich meat or served as cold cuts; in some cases where recipes call for chicken, it can be used as a substitute. Ground turkey is sold, and frequently marketed as a healthy alternative to ground beef. Without careful preparation, cooked turkey is usually considered to end up less moist than other poultry meats such as chicken or duck.

Wild turkeys, while technically the same species as domesticated turkeys, have a very different taste from farm-raised turkeys. Almost all of the meat is “dark” (including the breast) with a more intense flavor. The flavor can also vary seasonally with changes in available forage, often leaving wild turkey meat with a gamier flavor in late summer, due to the greater number of insects in its diet over the preceding months. Wild turkey that has fed predominantly on grass and grain has a milder flavor. Older heritage breeds also differ in flavor. Traditionally raised English turkey meat has been granted the EU and UK designation Traditional Specialty Guaranteed under the name Traditional Farm Fresh Turkey.

A large amount of turkey meat is processed. It can be smoked, and as such, is sometimes sold as turkey ham or turkey bacon, which is considered to be far healthier than pork bacon. Twisted helices of deep-fried turkey meat, sold as “turkey twizzlers”, came to prominence in the UK in 2004, when chef Jamie Oliver campaigned to have them and similar foods removed from school dinners.

Roast turkey

Unlike chicken eggs, turkey eggs are not commonly sold as food due to the high demand for whole turkeys and lower output of eggs as compared with other fowl (not only chickens, but even ducks or quail). The value of a single turkey egg is estimated to be about $3.50 on the open market, substantially more than an entire carton of one dozen chicken eggs.

Turkeys are traditionally eaten as the main course of Thanksgiving dinner feasts in the United States and Canada, and at Christmas dinner feasts in much of the rest of the world[citation needed] (often as stuffed turkey).

Turkey meat has been eaten by indigenous peoples from Mexico, Central America, and the southern tier of the United States since antiquity. In the 15th century, Spanish conquistadores took Aztec turkeys back to Europe.

Turkey was eaten in as early as the 16th century in England. Before the 20th century, pork ribs were the most common food for the North American holidays, as the animals were usually slaughtered in November. Turkeys were once so abundant in the wild that they were eaten throughout the year, the food considered commonplace, whereas pork ribs were rarely available outside of the Thanksgiving–New Year season. While the tradition of turkey at Christmas spread throughout Britain in the 17th century, among the working classes, it became common to serve goose, which remained the predominant roast until the Victorian era.

Turkey with mole is regarded as Mexico’s “national dish”.

Both fresh and frozen turkeys are used for cooking; as with most foods, fresh turkeys are generally preferred, although they cost more. Around holiday seasons, high demand for fresh turkeys often makes them difficult to purchase without ordering in advance. For the frozen variety, the large size of the turkeys typically used for consumption makes defrosting them a major endeavor: a typically sized turkey will take several days to properly defrost.

A roast turkey, a traditional American Thanksgiving meal.

Turkeys are usually baked or roasted in an oven for several hours, often while the cook prepares the remainder of the meal. Sometimes, a turkey is brined before roasting to enhance flavor and moisture content. This is done because the dark meat requires a higher temperature to denature all of the myoglobin pigment than the white meat (very low in myoglobin), so that fully cooking the dark meat tends to dry out the breast. Brining makes it possible to fully cook the dark meat without drying the breast meat. Turkeys are sometimes decorated with turkey frills, paper frills or “booties” that are placed on the end of drumsticks or bones of other cutlets.

In some areas, particularly the American South, they may also be deep fried in hot oil (often peanut oil) for 30 to 45 minutes by using a turkey fryer. Deep frying turkey has become something of a fad, with hazardous consequences for those unprepared to safely handle the large quantities of hot oil required.

Nutrition
When raw, turkey breast meat is 74% water, 25% protein, 1% fat, and contains no carbohydrates (table). In a 100-gram (3+1⁄2-ounce) reference amount, turkey breast supplies 465 kilojoules (111 kilocalories) of food energy, and contains high amounts (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of protein, niacin, vitamin B6, and phosphorus, with moderate content (10–19% DV) of pantothenic acid and zinc.

A 100 gram amount of turkey breast contains 279 mg of tryptophan, a low content compared to other amino acids in turkey breast meat. There is no scientific evidence that this amount of tryptophan from turkey causes

For Thanksgiving in the United States, turkey is traditionally served stuffed or with dressing (on the side), with cranberry sauce and gravy. Common complementary dishes include mashed potatoes, corn on the cob, green beans, squash, and sweet potatoes. Pie is the usual dessert, especially those made from pumpkins, apples, or pecans. It can also be eaten at Christmas in the United States and North America.

Roast turkey served with salad, sauces, sparkling apple juice, and Yule Log cake during a Christmas dinner feast.

For Christmas in the United Kingdom, turkey is traditionally served with winter vegetables, including roast potatoes, Brussels sprouts, and parsnips. Cranberry sauce is the traditional condiment in the northern rural areas of the United Kingdom where wild cranberries grow. In the south and in urban areas, where cranberries until recently were difficult to obtain, bread sauce was used in its place, but the availability of commercial cranberry sauce has seen a rise in its popularity in these areas, too. Sometimes, sausage meat, cocktail sausages, or liver wrapped in bacon is also served (known as bacon rolls or “pigs in blankets”).

Especially during holiday seasons around Thanksgiving and Christmas, stuffing or dressing is traditionally served with turkey. The many varieties include oatmeal, chestnut, sage and onion (flavored bread), cornbread, and sausage are the most traditional. Stuffing is used to stuff the turkey (as the name implies) or may be cooked separately and served as a side dish (dressing).

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 8, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Thawing frozen Turkey…..

It takes approximately 24 hours for every 4 to 5 pounds of whole turkey to thaw in the refrigerator. Once the turkey is thawed, you can keep it in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 additional days before cooking. For more information about thawing a turkey, go to Turkey Basics: Safe Thawing.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 17, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Grilling Chicken………

Searing meat gives beautiful grill marks and adds that mouthwatering barbecue char to chicken. The key to a good sear is dry meat and a hot grill. First, pat the chicken skin with a paper towel to take out as much moisture as possible. A super-hot grill allows the chicken to get a good sear and is less likely to stick. Season chicken breasts with salt and pepper. Clean and lightly oil hot grates. When ready, place the chicken on the grill (if using skin-on chicken, place skin side down on grill). Grill chicken, without turning, 6 to 10 minutes for boneless chicken and 10 to 14 minutes for bone-in. When it’s finished cooking, just like a good steak, chicken needs to rest.

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Swirl and Spice

Appreciation for Food and Wine with Sophistication, Elegance & Finesse

Gluten-Free Finder

Find certified gluten-free restaurants and products

Chicks & Jam

Sticky Winging It Through Life.

Whole and Heavenly Oven

Where healthy meets indulgent

Callywood Farms

Nourish Your Body, Excite Your Taste Buds, and Give Back to the Earth

The Happy Viking

I'm not a Viking woman... but I like the sound of it.

Diabetes Meal Ideas

This I can eat

the muffin anne

Vegan, Mother, Cooker

Home of Malones

A lifestyle blog sharing her tales of motherhood and love for fashion, food, entertainment and travel.

Rochelle's Kitchen London

Simple home cooking for family and friends...

Dinner at the Franzens

Here's what is cooking at our house

Siiri's Blog

The Journey to Self Reliance