Diabetic Dish of the Week – CREAMY TUNA MAC CASSEROLE

August 13, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week – CREAMY TUNA MAC CASSEROLE. Made using Macaroni Pasta, Cream of Mushroom Soup, Fat Free Sour Cream, Can of Tuna, Shredded Cheddar Cheese, Onions, Egg, Salt and Pepper, Potato Chips, and Paprika. The dish is 29 calories and 19 net carbs per serving. You can find this recipe along with all the other many Diabetic Friendly Recipes at the Diabetic Gourmet website. So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

CREAMY TUNA MAC CASSEROLE

Ingredients

2 (8 oz) packages Skinny Noodles Macaroni
1 (10.75 oz) can condensed cream of mushroom soup
1/2 Cup fat-free sour cream
1 (6 oz) can tuna, drained
1-1/2 Cup shredded cheddar cheese
1/2 Cup chopped onions
1 egg, whisked
Salt and pepper to taste
1/2 Cup finely crushed potato chips
1 pinch paprika

Directions

1 – Pre-heat oven to 400F.
2 – Open packages of Skinny Noodles Macaroni into a colander.
3 – Rinse with warm water and drain well. Pat dry noodles with paper towels.
4 – Heat a nonstick frying pan over medium heat.
5 – Add noodles and dry fry for 3-4 minutes; turn off heat and let sit.
6 – In a large bowl mix all ingredients except potato chips and paprika. Add Skinny Noodles and mix again, add salt and pepper to taste.
7 – Transfer content to a lightly greased 1.5 quart casserole dish, sprinkle top with crushed chips and paprika and cook for 30 – 35 minutes.
8 – Remove from heat and let sit for 10-15 minutes before serving.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 299
Fat: 15 grams
Fiber: 4 grams
Cholesterol: 73 milligrams
Protein: 18 grams
Carbohydrates: 23 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/creamy-tuna-mac-casserole

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One of America’s Favorites – Chips and Dip

February 19, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Chips and dip – crab dip and potato chips

Chips and dip are a food of chips or crisps served with dips. Chips used include potato chips, tortilla chips, corn chips, bean chips, vegetable chips, pita chips, plantain chips and others. Crackers are also sometimes used, as are crudités, which are whole or sliced raw vegetables. Various types of dips are used to accompany various types of chips.

Chips and dip gained significant popularity in the United States during the 1950s, in part due to a Lipton advertising campaign for their French onion dip recipe, sometimes referred to as “California dip”. Specialized trays and serving dishes designed to hold both chips and dip were created during this time. Chips and dip are frequently served during the Super Bowl American football game in the United States. National Chip and Dip Day occurs annually in the U.S. on March 23.

 

 

 

The popularity of chips and dip significantly increased in the United States during the 1950s, beginning circa 1954, due to changes in styles of entertaining in the suburbs and also due to a Lipton advertising campaign based upon using Lipton’s instant dehydrated onion soup mix to prepare dip. The advertising campaign occurred on television and in supermarket display advertising, and promoted mixing the soup mix with sour cream or cream cheese to create a dip, to be served with potato chips or crudités. This dip began to be called California Dip. The advertising campaign realized significant success, and new, similar dip products were quickly developed thereafter. During this time, unique platters designed for chips and dip service were created that allowed for the containment of several types of chips, and service variations were devised that included serving the dip in a bread bowl or hollowed-out fruit.

Chips and dip are a popular food during the annual Super Bowl game in the United States. Eighty-five percent of Americans eat potato chips.

 

 

A bowl of chile con queso served with tortilla chips as an appetizer

Chips and salsa, typically served using tortilla or corn chips, is a common type of chips and dip dish that gained significant popularity in the United States in the late 1980s. Chips and guacamole, also typically served with corn-based chips is another type, as well as chips and bean dip. Seven-layer dip and tortilla chips is another corn-based chip combination, as is chile con queso, an appetizer or side dish of melted cheese and chili pepper typically served in Tex-Mex restaurants as a sauce for nachos.

 

 

Double-dipping involves taking a bite of a chip and then re-dipping it into a dip, which some people disapprove, while others are indifferent. Double-dipping transfers bacteria from a person’s mouth into a dip, which can then be transferred to other consumer’s mouths.

The behavior of double-dipping involves consuming chips and dip, taking a bite of the chip, and then re-dipping it into a dip. In March 2013, Tostitos, a U.S. brand of tortilla chips and dips, hired the Ketchum communications agency to perform a survey concerning double dipping that polled over 1,000 Americans. The survey found that 46% of male participants double-dip at a party, compared to 32% of females. 54% stated that they would not consume dip after seeing another person double-dip, and 22% stated that they did not care. 25% stated that they would verbally object to a person caught double-dipping.

A study performed by the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Clemson University found that three to six instances of double-dipping “would transfer about 10,000 bacteria from the eater’s mouth to the remaining dip,” which corresponds with “about 50-100 bacteria from one mouth to another, in every bite.” The study concluded with the recommendation that double-dipping should be curtailed, along with tips to prevent it from occurring.

A segment on MythBusters in 2009 tested how much bacteria is transferred during the process of double-dipping, finding that there is a transfer but that it “adds only a few more microbes”.

 

 

Tortilla chips and several salsas

National Chip and Dip Day occurs in the United States annually on March 23. Tostitos-brand tortilla chips, a major U.S. brand, observed the day in 2015 by providing coupons for free dip for interested customers named “Chip”.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Potato Chips

July 11, 2016 at 4:59 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Potato chips

Potato chips

A potato chip (American English) or crisp (British English) is a thin slice of potato that has been deep-fried, baked, kettle-cooked, or popped until crunchy. Potato chips are commonly served as a snack, side dish, or appetizer. The basic chips are cooked and salted; additional varieties are manufactured using various flavorings and ingredients including herbs, spices, cheeses, and artificial additives.

“Crisps”, however, may also refer to many different types of savory snack products sold in the United Kingdom and Ireland, some made from potato, but some made from corn, tapioca, or other cereals, just as other varieties of chips are consumed in the United States.

Potato chips are a predominant part of the snack food market in Western countries. The global potato chip market generated total revenues of US$16.49 billion in 2005. This accounted for 35.5% of the total savory snacks market in that year ($46.1 billion).

 
The earliest known recipe for potato chips is in William Kitchiner’s 1822 cookbook The Cook’s Oracle, a bestseller in England and the United States; its recipe for “Potatoes fried in Slices or Shavings” reads “peel large potatoes, slice them about a quarter of an inch thick, or cut them in shavings round and round, as you would peel a lemon; dry them well in a clean cloth, and fry them in lard or dripping”.

Early recipes for potato chips in the United States are found in Mary Randolph’s Virginia House-Wife (1824), and in N.K.M. Lee’s Cook’s Own Book (1832), both of which explicitly cite Kitchiner.

Nonetheless, a legend associates the creation of potato chips with Saratoga Springs, New York, decades later. By the late 19th century, a popular version of the story attributed the dish to George Crum, a half African, half Native American cook at Moon’s Lake House, who was trying to appease an unhappy customer on August 24, 1853. The customer kept sending his French-fried potatoes back, complaining that they were too thick. Frustrated, he sliced the potatoes razor-thin, fried them until crisp and seasoned them with extra salt. To Crum’s surprise, the customer loved them. They soon became called “Saratoga Chips”, a name that persisted into at least the mid-20th century. A version of this story popularized in a 1973 national advertising campaign by St. Regis Paper Company, which manufactured packaging for chips, said that Crum’s customer was Cornelius Vanderbilt. Crum was renowned as a chef and by 1860 owned his own lakeside restaurant, Crum’s House.

In the 20th century, potato chips spread beyond chef-cooked restaurant fare and began to be mass-produced for home consumption. The Dayton, Ohio-based Mike-sell’s Potato Chip Company, founded in 1910, identifies as the “oldest potato chip company in the United States”. New England-based Tri-Sum Potato Chips, originally founded in 1908 as the Leominster Potato Chip Company, in Leominster, Massachusetts claim to be America’s first potato chip manufacturer. Chips sold in markets were usually sold in tins or scooped out of storefront glass bins and delivered by horse and wagon. The early potato chip bag was wax paper with the ends ironed or stapled together. At first, potato chips were packaged in barrels or tins, which left chips at the bottom stale and crumbled.

Laura Scudder, an entrepreneur in Monterey Park, California, started having her workers take home sheets of wax paper to iron into the form of bags, which were filled with chips at her factory the next day. This pioneering method reduced crumbling and kept the chips fresh and crisp longer. This innovation, along with the invention of cellophane, allowed potato chips to become a mass-market product. Today, chips are packaged in plastic bags, with nitrogen gas blown in prior to sealing to lengthen shelf life, and provide protection against crushing.

Traditional chips were made by the “batch-style” process, where all chips are fried all at once at a low temperature

Kettle-cooked chips

Kettle-cooked chips

and continuously raked to prevent them from sticking together. Industrial advance resulted in a shift to production by a “continuous-style” process, running chips through a vat of hot oil and drying them in a conveyor process. Consumer desire for original style chips resulted in the introduction of traditionally made “kettle-style” chips in the 2000s (known as hand-cooked in the UK/Europe).

 

 

An advertisement for Smith's Potato Crisps

An advertisement for Smith’s Potato Crisps

In an idea originated by the Smiths Potato Crisps Company Ltd, formed in 1920, Frank Smith packaged a twist of salt with his chips in greaseproof paper bags, which were sold around London.

The potato chip remained otherwise unseasoned until an innovation by Joe “Spud” Murphy, the owner of an Irish chip company called Tayto, who in the 1950s developed a technology to add seasoning during manufacture. After some trial and error, Murphy and his employee, Seamus Burke, produced the world’s first seasoned chips: Cheese & Onion, Barbecue, and Salt & Vinegar. This innovation was notable in the food industry. Companies worldwide sought to buy the rights to Tayto’s technique.

The first flavored chips in the United States, barbecue flavor, were being manufactured and sold by 1954. In 1958, Herr’s was the first company to introduce barbecue-flavored potato chips in Pennsylvania.

In the United States, popular potato chip flavorings include sour cream and onion, dill pickle, barbecue, ranch dressing, salt and vinegar, cheddar, and lemon-lime. In the Gulf South, Zapp’s Potato Chips of Gramercy, Louisiana, manufactures kettle-fried chips with regional flavors such as Crawtator, Cajun dill, Voodoo, and Creole onion.

 

 

Pringles potato chips are uniform in size and shape, which allows them to be stacked.

Pringles potato chips are uniform in size and shape, which allows them to be stacked.

Another type of potato chip, notably the Pringles and Lay’s Stax brands, is made by extruding or pressing a dough made from ground potatoes into the desired shape before frying. This makes chips that are uniform in size and shape, which allows them to be stacked and packaged in rigid tubes. In America, the official[citation needed] term for Pringles is potato crisps, but they are rarely referred to as such. Conversely, Pringles may be termed potato chips in Britain, to distinguish them from traditional “crisps”. Munchos, another brand that uses the term potato crisps, has deep air pockets in its chips that give it a curved shape, though the chips themselves resemble regular bagged chips.

An additional variant of potato chips exists in the form of “potato sticks”, also called shoestring potatoes. These are made as extremely thin (2 to 3 mm) versions of the popular French fry, but are fried in the manner of regular salted potato chips. A hickory-smoke-flavored version is popular in Canada, going by the vending machine name “Hickory Sticks”. Potato sticks are typically packaged in rigid containers, although some manufacturers use flexible pouches, similar to potato chip bags. Potato sticks were originally[when?] packed in hermetically sealed steel cans. In the 1960s, manufacturers switched to the less expensive composite canister (similar to the Pringles container). Reckitt Benckiser was a market leader in this category under the Durkee Potato Stix and French’s Potato Sticks names, but exited the business in 2008. In 2014, French’s reentered the market.

A larger variant (about 1 cm thick) made with dehydrated potatoes is marketed as Andy Capp’s Pub Fries, using the theme of a long-running British comic strip, which are baked and sold in a variety of flavors. Walkers make a similar product (using the Smiths brand) called “Chipsticks” which are sold in ready-salted and salt and vinegar flavors.

Americans’ appetite for crispy snacks gave birth to the packaged, flavored corn chips, with such brands as Fritos,

Flavored corn chips such as Fritos are an outgrowth of traditional fried tortilla chips.

Flavored corn chips such as Fritos are an outgrowth of traditional fried tortilla chips.

CC’s, and Doritos dominating the market.[citation needed] “Swamp chips” are similarly made from a variety of root vegetables, such as parsnips, rutabagas, and carrots. Japanese-style variants include extruded chips, like products made from rice or cassava. In South Indian snack cuisine, an item called happla in Kannada/vadam in Tamil, is a chip made of an extruded rice-sago or multigrain base that has been around for many centuries.

Many other products might be called “crisps” in Britain, but would not be classed as “potato chips” because they are not made with potato or are not chipped (for example, Wotsits, Quavers, Skips, Hula Hoops, and Monster Munch).

Kumara (sweet potato) chips are eaten in Korea, New Zealand, and Japan; parsnip, beetroot, and carrot crisps are available in the United Kingdom. India is famous for a large number of localized ‘chips shops’, selling not only potato chips, but also other varieties such as plantain chips, tapioca chips, yam chips, and even carrot chips. Plantain chips, also known as chifles or tostones, are also sold in the Western Hemisphere from Canada to Chile. In the Philippines, banana chips can be found sold at local stores. In Kenya, chips are made from arrowroot and casava. In the United Kingdom, Sweden, Finland, and Australia, a new variety of Pringles made from rice has been released and marketed as lower in fat than its potato counterparts.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 27, 2014 at 5:26 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 3 Comments
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Homemade Potato Chips….

 

Salt homemade potato chips by putting them in a paper bag with salt and shaking. This way, the salt is evenly distributed and the paper absorbs the excess grease. Save calories wherever you can!

Provolone Buffalo Burger w/ Reduced fat Potato Chips and a side of Peaches

June 3, 2013 at 5:21 PM | Posted in Aunt Millie's, Wild Idea Buffalo | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Provolone Buffalo Burger w/ Reduced fat Potato Chips and a side of Peaches

 

 

A beautiful day out today! About 71 degrees and sunny , a perfect day. I was able to get the 4 wheeler out for a while and got around to cleaning the shed , finally! For dinner I went light, not much of an appetite today. I prepared a 1/4 lb. buffalo Burger topped with Provolone Cheese with sides of Light Potato Chips and Sliced Peaches.

 
I used my favorite burger, Wild Idea Buffalo 1/4 Buffalo Burger. I seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. IBuffalo burger 001 then pan fried it in Canola Oil about 3 1/2 minutes per side. Buffalo gets done rather quickly due to it’s so lean. I topped it with a slice of Sargento Ultra Thin Provolone Cheese and served it on a Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bun.

 
For sides for my Buffalo Burger I had some Ruffles Light Wavy Chips, 80 calories and 17 carbs per serving and I had a small bowl of Del Monte No Sugar Added Sliced Peaches. For dessert/snack later a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of jolly Time Pop Corn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalowild Idea Burgers
4 – 1/4-Lb Buffalo Burgers
Prepare for a whole new level of burger. Conveniently pre-made into one-quarter pound patties that are ever so grillable. Dinner ready. Each pack is 1 pound with 4 – 1/4 Lb patties.

Also available: Buy a Burger Bundle and receive 10 packages for the price of 9.
$12.50

 
http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/collections/a-la-carte/products/4-1-4-lb-ready-made-buffalo-burgers-1-lb-pack

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