Ohio Festivals June 9-11, 2017

June 7, 2017 at 4:51 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

June 9-10, 2017 Annual Pork Rind Heritage Festival – Harrod, Ohio
The Pork Rind Heritage Festival offers family fun, entertainment, and Rudolph Foods’ famous popped pork rinds. The two day event includes live entertainment, corn hole tournaments, a 5K Run, and much more for the whole family. Second weekend in June.

http://www.porkrindfest.com/about/

 

 

June 9-10, 2017 23rd Annual Banana Split Festival – Wilmington, Ohio
Celebrating Wilmington’s claim as the birthplace of the Banana Split in 1907. Music, car show, crafts, games, etc.

http://www.bananasplitfestival.com/

 

 

June 9-11, 2017
Versailles Poultry Days
Versailles, Ohio
The 66th annual event will have chicken dinners, entertainment, Miss Chick and Little Miss Poultry Days contests, rides and games for all ages, two parades, kiddie tractor pull, 5K Run, arts, crafts, flower, and photography shows, and the greatest Ultimate Frisbee Tournament in the world! Attendance: 25,000.

http://www.versaillespoultrydays.com/

 

 

June 9-11, 2017 53rd Strawberry Festival – Bedford, Ohio
Presented by the Bedford Historical Society, the festival will offer plenty of berries with ice cream, entertainment, and a classic car show.

http://www.bedfordohiohistory.org/

 

 

June 10, 2017 Yellow Springs Street Fair – Yellow Springs, Ohio
An all-day festival with entertainment throughout the Village. Over 200 booths. Two Music Stages, a Beer Garden and Street Performers throughout town. For children, Primary Languages will have free crafts along with face painting and cookie decorating with donations going to the Dayton International School.

http://www.yellowspringsohio.org/street-fair/

Advertisements

One of America’s Favorites – Fatback

June 5, 2017 at 5:33 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fatback is a cut of meat from a domestic pig. It consists of the layer of adipose tissue (subcutaneous fat) under the skin of the back, with or without the skin (pork rind). Fatback is “hard fat”, distinct from the visceral fat that occurs in the abdominal cavity and is called “soft fat” and leaf lard.

Like other types of pig fat, fatback may be rendered to make a high quality lard, and is one source of salt pork. Finely

1. fatback

diced or coarsely ground fatback is an important ingredient in sausage making and in some meat dishes.

Fatback is an important element of traditional charcuterie. In several European cultures it is used to make specialty bacon. Containing no skeletal muscle, this bacon is a delicacy.

At one time fatback was Italy’s basic cooking fat, especially in regions where olive trees are sparse or absent, but health concerns have reduced its popularity. However, it provides a rich, authentic flavour for the classic battuto – sautéed vegetables, herbs and flavourings – that forms the basis of many traditional dishes. Today, pancetta is often used instead.

 

Bacon

Salo with the rind on

Fatback is processed into slab bacon by many methods, including brine curing, dry curing, smoking, or boiling. Usually the skin (rind) is left on.

This fatback bacon is widely eaten throughout Europe. In Italy it is called lardo, and notable examples are Valle d’Aosta Lard d’Arnad and Lardo di Colonnata. In Ukraine, Russia, and other countries of the former Soviet Union, it is called salo. In Hungary, where it is called szalonna, it is very popular for campfire cookouts (szalonnasütés). In Germany, where it is called Rückenspeck (back pork fat), it is one of two cuts known as Speck.

 

Pork rinds

Breaded and fried fatback

Fatback is a traditional part of southern US cuisine, soul food and traditional Cuisine of Quebec, where it is used for fried pork rinds (known there as cracklings, or Oreilles de crisse in Quebec), and to flavor stewed vegetables such as leaf vegetables, green beans, and black-eyed peas. A common delicacy is strips of heavily salted and fried fatback. Fatback was extremely popular in the South during the Great Depression because it is an inexpensive piece of meat. In the southwestern United States, fried fatback is known by its Spanish name, chicharrón.

 

In sausages
Fatback is an important ingredient in notable traditional sausages including nduja, cudighi, and cotechino Modena.

 

In Cooking

Homemade lard rendered from fatback

In French cooking, very thinly sliced fatback is used to line the mold when making a terrine or pâté, and thin strips of fatback are inserted under the skin of lean gamebirds for roasting. These techniques are barding and larding, respectively, and in both the fatback is used without the rind. Fatback also is used to make lardons, salt pork, and lard.

 

 

Ohio Festivals June 10-12, 2016

June 8, 2016 at 5:06 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

A lot of great festivals going on in Ohio this week!

 

June 10-11, 2016 Annual Pork Rind Heritage Festival – Harrod, OhioOHIO 2
The Pork Rind Heritage Festival offers family fun, entertainment, and Rudolph Foods’ famous popped pork rinds. The two day event includes live entertainment, corn hole tournaments, a 5K Run, and much more for the whole family. Second weekend in June.

http://www.porkrindfest.com/about/

 
June 10-11, 2016 22nd Annual Banana Split Festival – Wilmington, Ohio
Celebrating Wilmington’s claim as the birthplace of the Banana Split in 1907. Music, car show, crafts, games, etc.

http://www.bananasplitfestival.com/

 
June 10-12, 2016 Versailles Poultry Days – Versailles, Ohio
The 65th annual event will have chicken dinners, entertainment, Miss Chick and Little Miss Poultry Days contests, rides and games for all ages, two parades, kiddie tractor pull, 5K Run, arts, crafts, flower, and photography shows, and the greatest Ultimate Frisbee Tournament in the world! Attendance: 25,000.

http://www.versaillespoultrydays.com/

 
June 10-12, 2016 52nd Strawberry Festival – Bedford, Ohio
Presented by the Bedford Historical Society, the festival will offer plenty of berries with ice cream, entertainment, and a classic car show.

http://www.bedfordohiohistory.org/

 
June 11, 2016 Yellow Springs Street Fair – Yellow Springs, Ohio
An all-day festival with entertainment throughout the Village. Over 200 booths. Two Music Stages, a Beer Garden and Street Performers throughout town. For children, Primary Languages will have free crafts along with face painting and cookie decorating with donations going to the Dayton International School.

http://www.yellowspringsohio.org/street-fair/

One of America’s Favorites – Pork Rinds

February 15, 2016 at 6:01 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,
Pork Rinds

Pork Rinds

Pork rind is the skin (rind) of a pig. Pork rind is a common ingredient of sausages, which helps to improve their consistency. Fried or roasted pork rind and fat is also a snack. The frying renders much of the fat that is attached to the uncooked rind, causing the cooked product to reduce considerably in size. The product may be known by alternative names, such as pork scratchings or pork crackling in the UK, although the term crackling may also refer to the rind atop a roasted pork joint.

 

 

Often a by-product of the rendering of lard, it is also a way of making even the tough skin of a pig edible. In many ancient cultures, animal fats were the only way of obtaining oil for cooking and it was common in many people’s diet until the industrial revolution made vegetable oils more common and more affordable.

Microwaveable pork rinds are sold in bags that resemble microwaveable popcorn (although not exhibiting the popping sound) and can be eaten still warm. Pickled pork rinds, on the other hand, are often enjoyed refrigerated and cold. Unlike the crisp and fluffy texture of fried pork rinds, pickled pork rinds are very rich and buttery, much like foie gras.

 

A bowl of pork rinds

A bowl of pork rinds

For the large-scale production of commercial pork rinds, frozen, dried pork skin pellets are used. They are first rehydrated in water with added flavouring, and then fried in pork fat at 200-210 degrees Celsius. Cooking makes the rinds expand and float on the oil surface. The rinds are then removed from the fat, flavored and air-dried. Antioxidants may be added to improve stability.

 

 

Like many snack foods, pork rinds are high in sodium and fat, however, they are low in carbohydrates and are sometimes considered an alternative snack food for those following the Atkins diet. According to Men’s Health, a one-ounce (28 g) serving contains nine times the protein and less fat than is found in a serving of potato chips, which are much higher in carbohydrates. They add that 43 percent of pork rind’s fat is unsaturated, and most of that is oleic acid, the same healthy fat found in olive oil. Another 13 percent of its fat content is stearic acid, a type of saturated fat that is considered harmless because it does not raise cholesterol levels. A 60g serving of pork rind contains 29g of fat, 375 kcal and 0.65g of sodium. However, pork rinds are considered an incomplete source of protein because they contain very low amounts of some essential amino acids, including methionine, tryptophan and histidine.

 

 

A pork scratching from a bag

A pork scratching from a bag

Pork rinds, sometimes cracklings, is the American name for fried or roasted skins of pigs, geese or other animals, regardless of the status or amount of pork in the snack. Pieces of fried meat, skin, or membrane produced as a byproduct of rendering lard are also called cracklings. Cracklings consist of either roasted or fried pork rind that has had salt rubbed into it and scored with a sharp knife: “a crackling offers a square of skin that cracks when you bite into it, giving way to a little pocket of hot fat and a salty layer of pork meat.”

Cajun cracklings (or “cracklins”) from Cajun cuisine (called “gratons” in Louisiana French), are fried pieces of pork fat with a small amount of attached skin, flavored after frying with a mixture of peppery Cajun spices.

Pork rinds normally refers to a snack food commercially sold in plastic bags. They are made in a two-step process: pork skin is first rendered and dried, and then fried and puffed. These are also called by the Mexican name, chicharrón, in reference to the popular Mexican food.

Pork rinds sold in the United States are occasionally stained with a pink or purple spot. These edible marks are actually USDA stamps used on the skins to mark that they have been inspected, and graded. They are not harmful.

In 2003, sales of pork rinds experienced rapid growth, but they have dropped “by $31 million since 2004, when they reached $134 million, and now make up barely more than 1 percent of the salty snack market.”
Pork Rinds

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Moosmosis

Exploring an Arts & Sciences Education

The Throwback Chef

vintage recipes tried and shared

Wishing Wells Life

Real Food, Real Creativity, Real Life

Mediterranean Recipes 101

Mediterranean diet is based on the tradtional food that people used to eat in counntries like Italy, Greece, and Spain.

In Dianes Kitchen

Recipes showing step by step directions with pictures and gadget reviews

The World according to Dina

Notes on Seeing, Reading & Writing, Living & Loving in The North

Patriot Mom

Family. Health. Liberty.

Be Unique

Blogging, vlogging and dealing with life

Heathers' Fresh Cooking

Fresh ingredients and great ideas for your table.

Afoodiehousewife

What's cookin' ??

Analiza Gonzales

A blog about cooking, travel, fashion, interior, DIY and family, but mostly cooking

Dians Cooks

A messy kitchen is a sign of happiness

thesimpletimesblog.wordpress.com/

LIVE SIMPLY * LIVE FULLY

The Tiny Potager

Self Sufficiency and Sustainable Living - with a family of six

The Waffle Blog

BECAUSE I JUST CAN'T SEEM TO MAKE UP MY MIND

Miami Cuisine

Simple Recipes / Recetas Simples