“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Wild Rice Arugula Salad with Maple Glazed Acorn Squash

July 2, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Meatless Monday, PBS | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Wild Rice Arugula Salad with Maple Glazed Acorn Squash. I found this one on many web sites and I’m going with the one from the PBS Recipe web site. The Maple Glazed Acorn Squash and Rice had me sold on the dish! You can find this recipe at the PBS/Recipe website. At the PBS site they have an incredible selection of recipes from all cuisines. So check it out today and don’t forget to Support your local PBS Network! So enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/

Wild Rice Arugula Salad with Maple Glazed Acorn Squash
Combine wild rice, maple glazed acorn squash, pomegranate and goat cheese.

Ingredients
For the Acorn Squash:
1 small acorn squash, halved, cut into 1/4-inch slices and seeds discarded
1 teaspoon maple syrup
Salt
For the Rice:
1/2 cup wild rice
1 1/4 cup water
Pinch of salt
1 teaspoon olive oil
For the Dressing:
1 tablespoon olive oil
Juice from 1 lemon
1 garlic clove, minced
Salt
Freshly ground pepper
For the Assembly:
3 ounces baby or regular arugula
2 tablespoons minced fresh Italian parsley
Seeds from 1/4 pomegranate
1 ounce goat cheese, crumbled

Directions
1 – Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F. On a parchment-lined baking sheet, spread out the slices of acorn squash. Brush both sides of the slices with maple syrup and sprinkle with a few pinches of salt. Transfer to the oven to roast for 20 to 25 minutes, until the squash is tender with a fork. The cook time may depend on the size of your squash so just be sure to check on it.
2 – Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, set over medium heat, combine the rice, water, salt and olive oil. Bring the mixture to an aggressive simmer and then immediately lower to a gentle simmer and cover. Cook the rice until water is evaporated and until the texture is tender, about 10 to 15 minutes. Wild rice depends on the type you end up buying; I’d recommend following the instructions on the back of the bag (it most likely will be similar to these instructions but may vary slightly).
3 – In a small bowl, whisk the dressing ingredients together, along with a few pinches of salt and a few turns of freshly ground pepper.
4 – At this point, you can store all of the components separately and toss everything together before serving. If you want to assemble now, toss the arugula and Italian parsley with the dressing, being sure the leaves are thoroughly coated with the dressing. Add the rice and toss once more. Arrange the slices of acorn squash and top with the pomegranate seeds and goat cheese crumbles.
http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/wild-rice-arugula-salad-maple-glazed-acorn-squash/

10 Power Foods You Should Eat This Winter

December 27, 2017 at 6:29 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its – 10 Power Foods You Should Eat This Winter. Find all the tips and recipes at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

10 Power Foods You Should Eat This Winter
Include these wintertime power foods for diabetes in your meal plan to keep your health on top. Try them in our delicious diabetic recipes!

New Year, New You
Boost your health this season with the freshest winter ingredients. Learn which foods are at their peak during these chilly months, as well as how to pick them, how to cook them, and why they’re healthy. These foods are easy to incorporate into a diabetes meal plan and will tantalize your taste buds all winter long.

 

Brussels Sprouts
These small bulbs grow along stalks and have a taste and texture similar to cabbage. Brussels sprouts take a long time to grow and are best harvested in winter. In the produce aisle, look for sprouts that are green with little yellowing. To prepare this delicate vegetable, use fresh Brussels sprouts (refrigerate them for up to two days); rinse with cool water and remove the outer leaves………

Pomegranate
The edible seeds of a pomegranate are the real fruit of this dry-climate-grown produce. In the United States, pomegranates are typically grown in California and Arizona, where humidity is scarce. The bright red seeds are surrounded by membranes inside and protected by a thick and colorful skin.

Pomegranates are the perfect balance between tart and sweet. Throw these seeds on top of salads, or eat them plain. You can also cook down the seeds and reduce the juice into a delectable syrup perfect for topping off whole wheat pancakes………

Cinnamon
Cinnamon is a kitchen staple that seems to get more popular as the months get colder. Cinnamon provides a hint of spice and warmth to almost any recipe, including pumpkin pie and hot chocolate. In the 1600s, cinnamon was a valuable commodity in the Dutch East India trade, but its use dates back to the Ancient Egyptians.

Bark from cinnamon trees is stripped to reveal an inner bark that is allowed to coil into quills. Quills are then cut and dried. Ceylon cinnamon is commonly grown in Sri Lanka. Cassia cinnamon is similar to Ceylon, but it comes from a darker bark and is much coarser and less fragrant. Cassia cinnamon is the variety typically used by Americans……………..

 

* Click the link below to get all the – 10 Power Foods You Should Eat This Winter
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/food-to-eat/nutrition/10-power-foods-you-should-eat-winter

Fall Harvest: Pomegranates

October 12, 2013 at 8:15 AM | Posted in fruits, vegetables | 2 Comments
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Pomegranates only ripen in warmer climates. They are in season starting in October and are usually available fresh through December.

 

A pomegranate fruit

A pomegranate fruit

The pomegranate /ˈpɒmɨɡrænɨt/, botanical name Punica granatum, is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree growing between 5–8 meters (16–26 ft) tall.
The pomegranate is widely considered to have originated in the vicinity of Iran and has been cultivated since ancient times. Today, it is widely cultivated throughout the Mediterranean region of southern Europe, the Middle East and Caucasus region, northern Africa and tropical Africa, the Indian subcontinent, Central Asia and the drier parts of southeast Asia. Introduced into Latin America and California by Spanish settlers in 1769, pomegranate is also cultivated in parts of California and Arizona.
In the Northern Hemisphere, the fruit is typically in season from September to February. In the Southern Hemisphere, the pomegranate is in season from March to May.
The pomegranate has been mentioned in many ancient texts, notably in Babylonian texts, the Book of Exodus, the Homeric Hymns and the Quran. In recent years, it has become more common in the commercial markets of North America and the Western Hemisphere.
Pomegranates are used in cooking, baking, juices, smoothies and alcoholic beverages, such as martinis and wine.

 

 

The Punica granatum leaves are opposite or sub-opposite, glossy, narrow oblong, entire, 3–7 cm long and 2 cm broad. The flowers are bright red, 3 cm in diameter, with four to five petals (often more on cultivated plants). Some fruitless varieties are grown for the flowers alone. The edible fruit is a berry and is between a lemon and a grapefruit in size, 5–12 cm in diameter with a rounded hexagonal shape, and has thick reddish skin. The exact number of seeds in a pomegranate can vary from 200 to about 1400 seeds, contrary to some beliefs that all pomegranates have exactly the same number of seeds. Each seed has a surrounding water-laden pulp—the edible aril—ranging in color from white to deep red or purple. The seeds are embedded in a white, spongy, astringent membrane.

 

 

Pomegranate in cross section

Pomegranate in cross section

After the pomegranate is opened by scoring it with a knife and breaking it open, the arils (seed casings) are separated from the peel and internal white pulp membranes. Separating the red arils is easier in a bowl of water because the arils sink and the inedible pulp floats. Freezing the entire fruit also makes it easier to separate. Another very effective way of quickly harvesting the arils is to cut the pomegranate in half, score each half of the exterior rind four to six times, hold the pomegranate half over a bowl and smack the rind with a large spoon. The arils should eject from the pomegranate directly into the bowl, leaving only a dozen or more deeply embedded arils to remove.
The entire seed is consumed raw, though the watery, tasty aril is the desired part. The taste differs depending on the subspecies of pomegranate and its ripeness.

The entire seed is consumed raw, though the watery, tasty aril is the desired part. The taste differs depending on the subspecies of pomegranate and its ripeness. The pomegranate juice can be very sweet or sour, but most fruits are moderate in taste, with sour notes from the acidic tannins contained in the aril juice. Pomegranate juice has long been a popular drink in Armenian, Persian and Indian cuisine, and began to be widely distributed in the United States and Canada in 2002.
Grenadine syrup is thickened and sweetened pomegranate juice and is used in cocktail mixing. Before tomatoes (a New World fruit) arrived in the Middle East, grenadine was widely used in many Iranian foods, and is still found in traditional recipes such as fesenjān, a thick sauce made from pomegranate juice and ground walnuts, usually spooned over duck or other poultry and rice, and in ash-e anar (pomegranate soup).

Wild pomegranate seeds are used as a spice known as anardana (from Persian: anar + dana, pomegranate + seed), most notably in Indian and Pakistani cuisine, but also as a substitute for pomegranate syrup in Persian cuisine. Dried whole arils can often be obtained in ethnic Indian subcontinent markets. These seeds are separated from the flesh, dried for 10–15 days and used as an acidic agent for chutney and curry preparation. Ground anardana is also used, which results in a deeper flavoring in dishes and prevents the seeds from getting stuck in teeth. Seeds of the wild pomegranate variety known as daru from the Himalayas are regarded as quality sources for this spice.
Dried pomegranate arils, found in some natural specialty food markets, still contain the seed and residual aril water, maintaining a natural sweet and tart flavor. Dried arils can be used in several culinary applications, such as trail mix, granola bars, or as a topping for salad, yogurt, or ice cream. Chocolate covered arils may be added to desserts and baked items.
In the Caucasus, pomegranate is used mainly as juice. In Azerbaijan, a sauce from pomegranate juice (narsharab) is usually served with fish or tika kabab. In Turkey, pomegranate sauce (Turkish: nar ekşisi) is used as a salad dressing, to marinate meat, or simply to drink straight. Pomegranate seeds are also used in salads and sometimes as garnish for desserts such as güllaç. Pomegranate syrup or molasses is used in muhammara, a roasted red pepper, walnut, and garlic spread popular in Syria and Turkey.
In Greece, pomegranate (Greek: ρόδι, rodi) is used in many recipes, including kollivozoumi, a creamy broth made from boiled wheat, pomegranates and raisins, legume salad with wheat and pomegranate, traditional Middle Eastern lamb kebabs with pomegranate glaze, pomegranate eggplant relish, and avocado-pomegranate dip. Pomegranate is also made into a liqueur, and as a popular fruit confectionery used as ice cream topping, mixed with yogurt, or spread as jam on toast. In Cyprus and Greece, and among the Greek Orthodox Diaspora, ρόδι (Greek for pomegranate) is used to make koliva, a mixture of wheat, pomegranate seeds, sugar, almonds and other seeds served at memorial services.
In Mexico, they are commonly used to adorn the traditional dish chiles en nogada, representing the red of the Mexican flag in the dish which evokes the green (poblano pepper), white (nogada sauce) and red (pomegranate arils) tricolor.

 

Green salad with roast beef, pomegranate vinaigrette, and lemon juice

Green salad with roast beef, pomegranate vinaigrette, and lemon juice

 
In preliminary laboratory research and clinical trials, juice of the pomegranate may be effective in reducing heart disease risk factors, including LDL oxidation, macrophage oxidative status, and foam cell formation. In mice, “oxidation of LDL by peritoneal macrophages was reduced by up to 90% after pomegranate juice consumption…”.
In a limited study of hypertensive patients, consumption of pomegranate juice for two weeks was shown to reduce systolic blood pressure by inhibiting serum angiotensin-converting enzyme. Juice consumption may also inhibit viral infections while pomegranate extracts have antibacterial effects against dental plaque.
Despite limited research data, manufacturers and marketers of pomegranate juice have liberally used evolving research results for product promotion, especially for putative antioxidant health benefits. In February 2010, the FDA issued a Warning Letter to one such manufacturer, POM Wonderful, for using published literature to make illegal claims of unproven antioxidant and anti-disease benefits.

 

 

 

Six healthy holiday party foods and recipes

December 18, 2012 at 9:49 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly | Leave a comment
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Came across this article from the West Hartford News on some healthy holiday party foods. I left the web link at the end of the post.
Six healthy holiday party foods and recipes

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

BOSTON – The holidays are here and so is all the festive food. Some of it is naughty but much of it can be nice.

“When party planning during the holidays, it’s important to have variety,” says Stacy Kennedy, MPH, RD, CSO, LDN, a nutritionist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. “Many of the foods we enjoy around the holidays are not only delicious to eat, but they may also contain cancer-fighting nutrients.” Kennedy says it’s easy to include them in any menu when you know what to look for. Here is a list of foods and recipes from Kennedy and her colleagues that belong on anyone’s “nice list.”

Ho-ho hummus

Skip those holiday dips that are buried in excess fat and calories. Kennedy says lighten up by substituting with an easy-to-prepare hummus. This recipe calls for pine nuts, which are rich in protein, zinc, copper and manganese, which are important for a healthy immune system. Legumes, like chickpeas, are a great source of protein and dietary fiber, which can help reduce the risk of cancer and help lower cholesterol.

Go nuts

Dust off that family nutcracker. Recent research finds that walnuts may help prevent kidney and colon cancers. In addition, the study suggests that walnuts are a rich source of antioxidants that may help protect cells from oxidative damage. Walnuts contain essential fatty acids, or the so-called “good fats,” which are known to help reduce blood pressure and boost the immune system. So go nuts with this simple pesto recipe.

Merry mango

Mangoes are naturally sweet and rich in a variety of antioxidants. One of them, lupeol, is thought to rid the body of harmful molecules known as free radicals, which can damage a cell’s DNA, triggering some forms of cancer and other diseases. Studies have indicated that mango pulp may lower the risk of prostate cancer, inflammation, arthritis, and diabetes. This colorful and refreshing mousse recipe will delight dinner guests.

Positively pomegranate

Pomegranates have definitely moved to the top of many people’s “nice list.” They are now found in everything from drinks to desserts and for good reason. Recent research suggests that drinking pomegranate juice may be a delicious way to help prevent prostate cancer, as well as prevent the metastasis and spread of prostate cancer cells. Try this good-for-you dessert that is layered with flavonoids, vitamin C, and other antioxidants.

Magical mixture

Want something magical this holiday? Try making a dip with fresh roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin can spice up many recipes, from muffins to ravioli. “It’s also one of the tastiest ways to enhance the body’s own natural cancer-fighting ability,” says Kennedy. Pumpkins are packed with nutrients called carotenoids, which have been linked to the prevention of colon, prostate, breast, and lung cancer. It’s actually the bright orange color that makes pumpkin rich in nutrients.

Here’s a twist on a classic party-size recipe.

Festive finger food

This appetizer (or snack) is made with winter squash. It’s not only delicious but also a good source of carotenoids. They act to clean out the dangerous free radicals that enter your body from stress or the environment.

Kennedy says don’t be afraid to experiment. Other tips to make this a healthy season – in dips, try substituting sour cream with low-fat plain Greek yogurt, go raw with crudités, add as many colorful foods as possible, get plenty of exercise, and remember, it’s a time for celebration so it’s OK to indulge a little.

 

More nutritious cancer-fighting recipes can be found at www.dana-farber.org/nutrition

.

 

http://www.westhartfordnews.com/articles/2012/12/11/entertainment/doc50c3b3cf8532f405411686.txt

 

Fruit of the Week – Pomegranate

September 6, 2011 at 11:51 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, fruits, low calorie, low carb | 8 Comments
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A pomegranate Punica granatum, is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree growing between five and eight meters tall. The pomegranate is native to the Caucasus, the Himalayas in north Pakistan and Northern India.

It has been cultivated in the Caucasus since ancient times, and today, is widely cultivated throughout Iran, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Iraq, Egypt, China, Burma, Saudi Arabia, Israel, Jordan, the drier parts of southeast Asia, the Mediterranean region of Southern Europe, and tropical Africa. Introduced into Latin America and California by Spanish settlers in 1769, pomegranate is now cultivated in parts of California and Arizona for juice production.

In the Northern Hemisphere, the fruit is typically in season from September to February. In the Southern Hemisphere, it is in season from March to May.

The pomegranate is a very ancient fruit, mentioned in the Homeric Hymns and the Book of Exodus. It has, in recent years, reached mainstream prominence in the commercial markets of North America and the Western Hemisphere.

The Punica granatum leaves are opposite or sub-opposite, glossy, narrow oblong, entire, 3–7 cm long and 2 cm broad. The flowers are bright red, 3 cm in diameter, with four to five petals (often more on cultivated plants). Some fruitless varieties are grown for the flowers alone. The edible fruit is a berry and is between a lemon and a grapefruit in size, 5–12 cm in diameter with a rounded hexagonal shape, and has thick reddish skin and around 600 seeds. Each seed has a surrounding water-laden pulp—the edible aril—ranging in color from white to deep red or purple. The seeds are embedded in a white, spongy, astringent pulp.

Punica granatum is grown as a fruit crop plant, and as ornamental trees and shrubs in parks and gardens. Mature specimens can develop sculptural twisted bark multi-trunks and a distinctive overall form. Pomegranates are drought-tolerant, and can be grown in dry areas with either a Mediterranean winter rainfall climate or in summer rainfall climates. In wetter areas, they can be prone to root decay from fungal diseases. They are tolerant of moderate frost, down to about −10°C (14°F).[citation needed] Insect pests of the pomegranate can include the pomegranate butterfly Virachola isocrates and the leaf-footed bug Leptoglossus zonatus. Pomegranate grows easily from seed, but is commonly propagated from 25–50 cm hardwood cuttings to avoid the genetic variation of seedlings. Air layering is also an option for propagation, but grafting fails.

Punica granatum nana is a dwarf variety of Punica granatum popularly planted as a ornamental plant in gardens and larger containers, and used as a bonsai specimen tree. It could well be a wild form with a distinct origin. The only other species in the genus Punica is the Socotran pomegranate (Punica protopunica) , which is endemic to the island of Socotra. It differs in having pink (not red) flowers and smaller, less sweet fruit.

After opening the pomegranate by scoring it with a knife and breaking it open, the arils (seed casings) are separated from the peel and internal white pulp membranes. Separating the red arils is easier in a bowl of water, because the arils sink and the inedible pulp floats. Freezing the entire fruit also makes it easier to separate. Another very effective way of quickly harvesting the arils is to cut the pomegranate in half, score each half of the exterior rind four to six times, hold the pomegranate half over a bowl and smack the rind with a large spoon. The arils should eject from the pomegranate directly into the bowl, leaving only a dozen or more deeply embedded arils to remove.

The entire seed is consumed raw, though the watery, tasty aril is the desired part. The taste differs depending on the subspecies of pomegranate and its ripeness. The pomegranate juice can be very sweet or sour, but most fruits are moderate in taste, with sour notes from the acidic tannins contained in the aril juice. Pomegranate juice has long been a popular drink in Persian and Indian cuisine, and began to be widely distributed in the United States and Canada in 2002.

Grenadine syrup is thickened and sweetened pomegranate juice used in cocktail mixing. Before tomatoes (a new-world fruit) arrived in the Middle East, grenadine was widely used in many Iranian foods, and is still found in traditional recipes such as fesenjān, a thick sauce made from pomegranate juice and ground walnuts, usually spooned over duck or other poultry and rice, and in ash-e anar (pomegranate soup).

Wild pomegranate seeds are used as a spice known as anardana (from Persian: anar+dana, pomegranate+seed), most notably in Indian and Pakistani cuisine, but also as a substitute for pomegranate syrup in Persian cuisine. Dried whole arils can often be obtained in ethnic Indian subcontinent markets. These seeds are separated from the flesh, dried for 10–15 days and used as an acidic agent for chutney and curry preparation. Ground anardana is also used, which results in a deeper flavoring in dishes and prevents the seeds from getting stuck in teeth. Seeds of the wild pomegranate variety known as daru from the Himalayas are regarded as quality sources for this spice.

Dried pomegranate arils, found in some natural specialty food markets, still contain the seed and residual aril water, maintaining a natural sweet and tart flavor. Dried arils can be used in several culinary applications, such as trail mix, granola bars, or as a topping for salad, yogurt, or ice cream. Chocolate covered arils, also available in gourmet food stores like Trader Joes, may be added to desserts and baked items.

In the Caucasus, pomegranate is used mainly as juice. In Azerbaijan a sauce from pomegranate juice (narsharab) is usually served with fish or tika kabab. In Turkey, pomegranate sauce, (Turkish: nar ekşisi) is used as a salad dressing, to marinate meat, or simply to drink straight. Pomegranate seeds are also used in salads and sometimes as garnish for desserts such as güllaç. Pomegranate syrup or molasses is used in muhammara, a roasted red pepper, walnut, and garlic spread popular in Syria and Turkey.

In Greece, pomegranate (Greek: ρόδι, rodi) is used in many recipes, including kollivozoumi, a creamy broth made from boiled wheat, pomegranates and raisins, legume salad with wheat and pomegranate, traditional Middle Eastern lamb kebabs with pomegranate glaze, pomegranate eggplant relish, and avocado-pomegranate dip. Pomegranate is also made into a liqueur and popular fruit confectionery used as ice cream topping or mixed with yogurt or spread as jam on toast. In Cyprus as well as in Greece and among the Greek Orthodox Diaspora, ρόδι is used to make kolliva, a mixture of wheat, pomegranate seeds, sugar, almonds and other seeds served at memorial services.

In preliminary laboratory research and clinical trials, juice of the pomegranate may be effective in reducing heart disease risk factors, including LDL oxidation, macrophage oxidative status, and foam cell formation. In an article published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2000, researchers detailed an experiment in which healthy adult men and unhealthy mice consumed pomegranate juice daily. After two weeks, the healthy men experienced increased antioxidant levels, which resulted in a ninety percent drop in LDL cholestoral oxidation. In the mice, “oxidation of LDL by peritoneal macrophages was reduced by up to 90% after pomegranate juice consumption…”

Chamomile-Pomegranate Tea

September 6, 2011 at 11:46 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, fruits, low calorie, low carb | 1 Comment
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Chamomile-Pomegranate Tea

Ingredients

4 chamomile tea bags
3 cup cold water , boiling
1 cup pomegranate juice
1/3 cup SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener, granulated
4 mint sprigs , sprigs (to garnish, optional)

Directions

1 Place tea bags in a large heat-proof measuring cup or pitcher; pour boiling water over tea bags. Steep 1 hour, or until cooled to room temperature. Remove and discard tea bags.
2 Add pomegranate juice and SPLENDA® Granulated Sweetener or SPLENDA® Packets, stirring until SPLENDA® dissolves. Serve over ice; garnish with mint sprigs.
Additional Information
Pomegranate juice has powerful antioxidants, so this punch is both relaxing and healthy.

Nutrition Facts
Makes 4 servings
Serving Size: 8 floz
Amount Per Serving
Calories     42.9
Total Carbs     10.7 g
Dietary Fiber     0 g
Sugars     8.5 g
Total Fat     0 g
Saturated Fat     0 g
Unsaturated Fat     0 g
Potassium     0 mg
Protein     0.2 g
Sodium     14.6 mg

http://www.dlife.com/diabetes/diabetic-recipes/Chamomile_Pomegranate-Tea/r3071161.html

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