Fish Fillet Sandwich w/ Baked Fries

April 8, 2017 at 5:19 PM | Posted in Alexia Potato Products, Gorton's Seafood | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Fish Fillet Sandwich w/ Baked Fries

 
For Breakfast on this chilly Saturday Morning I Prepared a Cheese Omelet, made with Egg Beater’s Egg Whites and Sargento Reduced Fat Shredded Sharp Cheddar Cheese. I then toasted a couple of slices of Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread, lightly buttered with I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter. Also had the every morning cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Cold out this morning, 32 degrees and light frost. The afternoon it got up into the 60,s and sunny. As it warmed up outside I got the leaf blower out and cleaned the deck and around the driveway. After Lunch I went over to spend the afternoon with Dad. He wasn’t having a very good day. He was having a lot of trouble breathing today. He’s been having more bad days than good lately, just keep praying for his recovery. Back home I did a load of laundry for Mom. For Dinner tonight, it’s a Dinner by the oven tonight! I prepared a Fish Fillet Sandwich w/ Baked Fries.

 

I picked up a bag of the Gorton’s Smart and Crunchy Breaded Fish Fillets at Meijer a while back and had them in the freezer. You bake them from frozen so I didn’t have to thaw them out. To prepare them I preheated the oven on 400 degrees. Then took a small baking pan and sprayed it with Pam Cooking Spray. Laid the Fish Fillets flat in the pan and baked for 24 minutes, I flipped them over after 15 minutes. The Fillets came out perfect! The Breading gave them a nice crunch and they had excellent flavor. They are 190 calories and 25 net carbs per serving which is 2 Fillets. Another great Seafood Product from Gorton’s, and another good one to have in the freezer! Served it a Healthy Life Whole Grain Hamburger Bun along with a slice of Kraft Sharp Cheddar Cheese.

 

For a side I baked up some Alexia Organic Yukon Select Fries. Seasoned them with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn Medley. Baked them at 425 degrees for 16 minutes. They bake up beautifully and seasoned just right, excellent Shoestring Fry! Plus they are only 120 calories and 15 net carbs. For dessert later Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

 

 

 

 

 
Gorton’s Smart and Crunchy Breaded Fish Fillets

100% wild-caught Alaskan Pollock breaded in a panko coating.

Good seafood that’s good for you.
All the classic flavor with half the guilt. Our Smart & Crunchy Fish Fillets have 50% less fat than regular fish fillets and are never fried — so there’s no need to sweat the 190 calories.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 2 fillets (108g)
Servings Per Container: 4
Ingredients:
Alaskan Pollock fillets, breadcrumb coating.
Alaskan Pollock fillets
Breadcrumb coating
Wheat flour, water, palm oil, yellow corn flour, whey, salt, natural flavor, garlic powder, onion powder, sugar, yeast, baking powder (baking soda, sodium aluminum phosphate), beet powder (color), colored with paprika, annatto, and turmeric extracts, xanthan gum, beta carotene (color).
CONTAINS: POLLOCK, WHEAT, MILK.

Amount Per Serving:
Calories 190 Calories from Fat 40
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 4.5g 7%
Saturated Fat 2.5g 13%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.5g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.5g
Cholesterol 30mg 10%
Sodium 470mg 20%
Potassium 180mg 5%
Total Carbohydrate 26g 9%
Dietary Fiber <1g 4%
Sugars 4g
Protein 11g 22%

 
Alexia Organic Yukon Select Fries

Lightly seasoned with sea salt, these Julienne Fries make your everyday French fry wonder where it went wrong.

Ingredients: Organic Potatoes, Organic Canola Oil and/or Organic Sunflower Oil and/or Organic Safflower Oil, Sea Salt, Citric Acid.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 3 oz (84 g)
Per Serving % Daily Value*
Calories 120
Calories from Fat 36
Total Fat 4g 6%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 200mg 8%
Potassium 310mg 9%
Carbohydrates 18g 6%
Dietary Fiber 3g 12%
Sugars 0g
Protein 2g
https://www.alexiafoods.com/products/fries/yukon-gold-julienne-fries

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Seafood of the Week – Fish Fingers

June 3, 2014 at 5:42 AM | Posted in fish, seafood, Seafood of the Week | Leave a comment
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Fried fish fingers

Fried fish fingers

Fish fingers, known as fish sticks in American and Canadian English and by translations of that name in most other languages, are a processed food made using a whitefish, such as cod, haddock or pollock, which has been battered or breaded.

They are commonly available in the frozen food section of supermarkets. They can be baked in the oven, grilled, shallow fried, or deep-fried.

 
The term ‘Fish Fingers’ is first referenced in a recipe given in a British popular magazine in 1900.

The commercialization of fish fingers may be traced to 1953 when the American company Gorton-Pew Fisheries, now known as Gorton’s, had been the first company to introduce a frozen ready-to-cook fish finger, named Gorton’s Fish Sticks, which won the Parents Magazine Seal of Approval.

There was a glut of herring in the United Kingdom after World War II. Clarence Birdseye test marketed herring fish fingers, a product he had discovered in the US, under the name ‘herring savouries’. These were tested in Southampton and South Wales against ‘cod sticks’, a comparably bland product used as a control. Shoppers, however, confounded expectations by showing an overwhelming preference for the cod.

 

 

Baked fish fingers on baking paper

Baked fish fingers on baking paper

The fish used may be either fillets cut to shape or minced/ground fish reformed to shape. Those made entirely from fillets are generally regarded as the higher quality products and will typically have a prominent sign on the box stating that the fish is 100% fillet. Minced fish is more commonly used in store brand economy products. They may have either batter or breadcrumbs around the outside as casing, although the coating is normally breadcrumbs.

In addition to white fish, fish fingers are sometimes made with salmon.

A commercially available variant of fish fingers is “Omega 3” fish fingers, which are high in omega-3 fatty acids.

 

 

Baked Pollock

July 9, 2013 at 9:54 AM | Posted in baking, fish | Leave a comment
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Baked Pollock

 

Ingredients

16 oz Pollock fillets
½ c. mushrooms, sliced
2 lg. scallions, chopped
1 t. sea salt
½ t. pepper
2 T white wine
2 t. lemon juice
¼ c. grated low fat cheddar cheese
¼ c. dry Italian style bread crumbs
2 T Blue Bonnet Light, melted

 

 

Directions

Prepare a baking dish with non-fat cooking spray. Sprinkle mushrooms and green onions over the bottom of the dish. Place the fish in a single layer over the mushrooms and scallions. Season the fish with salt and pepper and sprinkle wine and lemon juice over all. Top with grated cheese and sprinkle with bread crumbs. Pour melted butter evenly over the topping.
Cover and bake at 400° for 7 minutes. Uncover and bake another 5 minutes or until topping is golden brown.

Fish of the Week – Pollock

July 9, 2013 at 9:51 AM | Posted in Ball Park Smoked Turkey Franks, fish | Leave a comment
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Pollock (alternatively spelled pollack; pronounced /ˈpɒlək/) is the common name used for either of the two species of marine fish in

Pollock

Pollock

the Pollachius (“P.”) genus. Both P. pollachius and P. virens are commonly referred to as pollock. Other names for P. pollachius include the Atlantic pollock, European pollock, lieu jaune, and lythe; while P. virens is sometimes known as Boston blues (distinct from bluefish), coalfish (or coley), silver bills or saithe.

 

There are currently two recognized species in this genus:

* Pollachius pollachius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Pollack)
* Pollachius virens (Linnaeus, 1758) (Saithe)

 

 

Both species can grow to 3 ft 6 in (1.07 m) and can weigh up to 46 lb (21 kg). The fish has a strongly-defined, silvery lateral line running down the sides. Above the lateral line, the color is a greenish black. The belly is white. It can be found in water up to 100 fathoms (180 m) deep over rocks, and anywhere in the water column. Pollock are a “whitefish”.

 

One member of the genus Gadus is also commonly referred to as pollock. This is the Alaska pollock or walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) including the form known as the Norwegian pollock. While related (they are also members of the family Gadidae) to the above pollock species, they are not members of the Pollachius genus. Alaska pollock generally spawn in late winter and early spring in the southeastern Bering Sea. The Alaska pollock is a significant part of the commercial fishery in the Gulf of Alaska.

 

Atlantic pollock is largely considered to be a whitefish, although it is a fairly strongly flavored one. Traditionally a popular source of food in some countries, such as Norway, in the United Kingdom it has previously been largely consumed as a cheaper and versatile alternative to cod and haddock in the West Country, elsewhere being known mostly for its traditional use as “Pollack for puss / coley for the cat.” However, in recent years pollock has become more popular due to over-fishing of cod and haddock. It can now be found in most supermarkets as fresh fillets or prepared freezer items. For example, when minced, it is the primary component of fish fingers and popcorn fish.
It is often the common ingredient used to create imitation crab meat.
Because of its slightly gray color, pollock is often prepared, as in Norway, as fried fish balls, or if juvenile sized, breaded with oatmeal and fried, as in Shetland. Year-old fish are traditionally split, salted and dried over a peat hearth in Orkney, where their texture becomes wooden and somewhat phosphorescent. The fish can also be salted and smoked and achieve a salmon-like orange color (although it is not closely related to the salmon), as is the case in Germany where the fish is commonly sold as Seelachs or sea salmon. In Korea, pollock may be repeatedly frozen and melted to create hwangtae, half-dried to create ko-da-ri, or fully dried and eaten as book-o.
In 2009, U.K. supermarket Sainsbury’s renamed pollock ‘Colin’ in a bid to boost ecofriendly sales of the fish as an alternative to cod. The supermarket also suggested some shoppers may be too embarrassed to ask for the species under its proper title, due to its reputation as an inferior fish, and its similarity to a popular English swear word (bollocks). Sainsbury’s, which said the new name was derived from the French for cooked pollock (colin), launched the product under the banner “Colin and chips can save British cod.”

 

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