One of America’s Favorites – Eggs Sardou

March 2, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Eggs sardou at Red Dog Diner in New Orleans

Eggs Sardou is a Louisiana Creole cuisine dish made with poached eggs, artichoke bottoms, creamed spinach and Hollandaise sauce. It is on the menu of many Creole restaurants in New Orleans, including Antoine’s, where eggs Sardou was invented, and Brennan’s. Eggs Sardou is named for Victorien Sardou, a famous French dramatist of the 19th century, who was a guest in New Orleans when the dish was invented.

Cooked fresh spinach is creamed with a bechamel sauce, a drop or two of Tabasco sauce is added, and pre-cut artichoke bottoms are warmed in a 175°F oven for five to ten minutes. The eggs Sardou are assembled by placing spoonfuls of the warm creamed spinach on a warmed plate. The artichoke bottoms are placed on top of the creamed spinach and the poached eggs are set inside the artichoke bottoms. The assembly is then covered in the Hollandaise sauce. Some cooks omit nutmeg and cloves from the bechamel sauce when using it to cream spinach for eggs Sardou. Eggs Sardou can also be served with truffles, ham and anchovies.

Eggs Sardou should be served at once, while the spinach, artichokes, poached eggs and Hollandaise sauce are still warm. For this reason, a warmed plate or bowl is recommended in most recipes. The garnish, if any, should be something of a color that contrasts well with the yellow Hollandaise sauce that tops the dish. This may be anything from crumbled bacon or a small dice of ham to a simple sprinkle of paprika. If served as an appetizer course, no side dishes are needed. If served at brunch, or as an entree, the side dishes should be such that they do not overpower the muted, carefully blended flavors of the eggs, spinach, and sauce. If wine is to be served, it should be white, preferably a slightly sweet white wine.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Poached Egg

May 6, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A poached egg in a Salad Niçoise

A poached egg is an egg that has been cooked, outside the shell, by poaching (or sometimes steaming), as opposed to simmering or boiling liquid.

This method of preparation is favored for eggs, as it can yield more delicately cooked eggs than cooking at higher temperatures such as with boiling water.

The egg is cracked into a cup or bowl of any size, and then gently slid into a pan of water at approximately 75 Celsius (167 °F) and cooked until the egg white has mostly solidified, but the yolk remains soft. The “perfect” poached egg has a runny yolk, with a hardening crust and no raw white remaining.

Broken into water at the poaching temperature, the white will cling to the yolk, resulting in cooked egg white and runny yolk.

Any given chicken egg contains some egg white that is prone to dispersing into the poaching liquid and cooking into an undesirable foam. To prevent this, the egg can be strained beforehand to remove the thinner component of the egg white. A small amount of vinegar may also be added to the water, as its acidic qualities accelerate the poaching process. Stirring the water vigorously to create a vortex may also reduce dispersion.

A single broken poached egg on 2 pieces of toast

The term “poaching” is used for this method but is actually incorrect. The egg is placed in a cup and suspended over simmering water, using a special pan called an “egg-poacher”. This is usually a wide-bottomed pan with an inner lid, with holes containing a number of circular cups that each hold one egg, with an additional lid over the top. To cook, the pan is filled with water and brought to a simmer, or a gentle boil. The outer lid holds in the steam, ensuring that the heat surrounds the egg completely. The cups are often lubricated with butter in order to effect easy removal of the cooked egg, although non-stick egg poachers are also available.

The result is very similar to the traditional coddled egg, although these steamed eggs are often cooked for longer, and hence are firmer. Eggs so prepared are often served on buttered toast.

Poached eggs are used in the traditional American breakfast/brunch dish Eggs Benedict.

Poached eggs are the basis for many dishes in Louisiana Creole cuisine, such as Eggs Sardou, Eggs Portuguese, Eggs Hussarde and Eggs St. Charles. Creole poached egg dishes are typically served for brunches.

Eggs Benedict, a dish often served for breakfast or brunch.

Several cuisines include eggs poached in soup or broth and served in the soup. In parts of central Colombia, for instance, a popular breakfast item is eggs poached in a scallion/coriander broth with milk, known as changua or simply caldo de huevo (“egg soup”).

The North African dish shakshouka consists of eggs poached in a spicy tomato sauce.

In Italy poached eggs are typically seasoned with grated parmigiano reggiano and butter (or olive oil).

In Korean cuisine, poached eggs are known as suran (수란) and is topped with variety of garnishes such as chili threads, rock tripe threads, and scallion threads.

Turkish dish çılbır consists of poached eggs, yogurt sauce with garlic and butter with red peppers.

In India, fried eggs are most commonly called “poached,” but are sometimes also known as bullseyes, as a reference to “bullseye” targets, or “half-boil” in Southern India, indicating that they are partly cooked. These eggs are “poached” in name only and so do not share the same preparation method as poached eggs in other countries.

 

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Sweet Potato Turkey Bacon ‘Toast’

February 9, 2018 at 6:29 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is – Sweet Potato Turkey Bacon ‘Toast’. Made using JENNIE-O® Lower Sodium Turkey Bacon made with Sea Salt along with Sweet Potatoes, WHOLLY® SIMPLY AVOCADO™ dip, Poached Eggs, and Spices. Only 120 calories and 8 net carbs per serving. You can find this recipe along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

 

Sweet Potato Turkey Bacon ‘Toast’
Who needs bread to have toast? Sweet potatoes are the base of this fall-themed snack. Topped with JENNIE-O® Lower Sodium Turkey Bacon made with Sea Salt, avocado dip and a poached egg, this recipe makes a nutritious breakfast or brunch that’s sure to impress.

INGREDIENTS
2 large sweet potatoes
1 teaspoon kosher salt
6 slices JENNIE-O® Lower Sodium Turkey Bacon made with Sea Salt
1 (8-ounce) package WHOLLY® SIMPLY AVOCADO™ dip
6 poached eggs, kept warm, if desired
1 tablespoon smoked paprika or Aleppo pepper

DIRECTIONS
1) Slice sweet potatoes into 6 ½-inch slices. Place on parchment paper-lined baking sheet or jellyroll pan in a single layer. Lightly spray with cooking spray and sprinkle with salt. Bake 20 minutes, flipping half way through.
2) Cook turkey bacon as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Set aside.
30 Top sweet potatoes slices with avocado, bacon slices, and poached egg. Sprinkle with smoked paprika.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING
Calories 120
Protein 4g
Carbohydrates 12g
Fiber 4g
Sugars 3g
Fat 6g
Cholesterol 10mg
Sodium 440mg
Saturated Fat 1g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1206-sweet-potato-turkey-bacon-toast

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Pronto Poach Vegetable MONDAY

December 4, 2017 at 6:26 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is a – Pronto Poach Vegetable. Poached Egg Italian Style,  Vegetables, and Seasoned Yogurt make up this week’s Recipe. It’s from the CooksRecipes website. Check out the Cooks site for any recipe you may be looking for. They have Recipes to please all tastes and cuisines. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

Pronto Poach Vegetable

An economical, fast and easy main dish of poached eggs served over Italian-style vegetables and topped with seasoned yogurt.

Recipe Ingredients:

1 (10-ounce) package frozen Italian-style vegetables with sauce
2/3 cup water
4 large eggs
1/4 cup plain low-fat yogurt
1/2 teaspoon Italian salad dressing mix

Cooking Directions:

1 – Microwave vegetables according to package directions. Set aside. Keep warm while poaching eggs.

2 – Pour water into l-quart bowl or baking dish. Break and slip in eggs. Gently prick yolks with tip of knife or wooden pick. Cover with plastic wrap. Cook on full power about 1-1/2 to 3 minutes. If necessary, let stand, covered, until whites are completely set and yolks begin to thicken but are not hard, about 1 to 2 minutes. Lift out with slotted spoon. Drain in spoon or on paper towels. Trim any rough edges, if desired.

3 – Spoon 3/4 cup of the reserved vegetables on each of 2 serving plates. Top each with 2 of the poached eggs. Stir together yogurt and salad dressing mix until well blended. Spoon 1 tablespoon of the yogurt mixture over each egg.

Makes 2 servings.

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/pronto_poach_vegetale_recipe.html

One of America’s Favorites – Boiled Eggs

August 24, 2015 at 5:03 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Boiled eggs

Boiled eggs

Boiled eggs are eggs (typically chicken eggs) cooked by immersion in boiling water with their shells unbroken. (Eggs cooked in water without their shells are known as poached eggs, while eggs cooked below the boiling temperature, either with or without the shell, are known as coddled eggs.) Hard-boiled eggs are either boiled long enough for the egg white and then the egg yolk to solidify, or they are left in hot water to cool down, which will gradually solidify them, while a soft-boiled egg yolk, and sometimes even the white, remains at least partially liquid.

The egg timer was so-named due to its common usage in timing the boiling of eggs. Boiled eggs are a popular breakfast food in many countries around the world.

 

 

There are variations both in desired doneness and in the method of how eggs are boiled, and a variety of kitchen gadgets for eggs exist. These variations include:

Baked eggs
Baking eggs in an oven instead of boiling in water. Baked eggs (350 °F (177 °C) for 1/2 hour in a muffin tin, cool in ice water) are identical to boiled eggs but the shells peel easier.
Starting temperature
Room temperature (for more even cooking and to prevent cracking) or from a refrigerator; eggs may be left out overnight to come to room temperature.
Preparation
Some pierce the eggs beforehand with an egg piercer to prevent cracking. There is much debate on this subject. Ekelund et al. in Why eggs should not be pierced claimed that pricking caused egg white proteins to be damaged and was therefore to be discouraged. Others recommend against this,[note 1] or add vinegar to the water (as is sometimes done with poached eggs) to prevent the white from billowing in case of cracking. For this purpose, table salt can also be used.
Placing in water
There are various ways to place the eggs in the boiling water and removing: one may place the eggs in the pan prior to heating, lower them in on a spoon, or use a specialized cradle to lower them in. A cradle is also advocated as reducing cracking, since the eggs do not then roll around loose. To remove, one may allow the water to cool, pour off the boiling water, or remove the cradle.
Steaming
Eggs are taken straight from the refrigerator and placed in the steamer at full steam. The eggs will not crack due to sudden change in temperatures. At full steam, “soft-boiled” eggs are ready in 6 minutes, “hard-boiled” eggs at 8 minutes. As the eggs are cooked by a steam source, there is no variation of water temperature and hence cooking time, no matter how many eggs are placed in the steamer.
Cooking time
There is substantial variation, with cooking time being the primary variable affecting doneness (soft-boiled vs. hard-boiled). It usually varies from 15–17 minutes for large hard-boiled eggs, 1–4 minutes for large soft-cooked eggs and 12 minutes for the best results. Depending on altitude above sea level and humidity densities in a given climate, one may require extended amounts of time to reach the soft-boiled stage, and in fact, may never reach a fully hard stage.
Cooking temperature
In addition to cooking at a rolling boil (at 100 °C (212 °F)), one may instead add the egg before a boil is reached, remove water from heat after a boil is reached, or attempt to maintain a temperature below boiling, the latter all variants of coddling.
Cooling
After eggs are removed from heat, some cooking continues to occur, particularly of the yolk, due to residual heat, a phenomenon called carry over cooking, also seen in roast meat. For this reason some allow eggs to cool in air or plunge them into cold water as the final stage of preparation. If time is limited, adding a few cubes of ice will quickly reduce the temperature for easy handling.
Service

A boiled egg, presented in an eggcup

A boiled egg, presented in an eggcup

Boiled eggs may be served loose, in an eggcup, in an indentation in a plate (particularly a presentation platter of deviled eggs), cut with a knife widthwise, cut lengthwise, cut with a knife or tapped open with a spoon at either end, or peeled (and optionally sliced, particularly if hard-boiled, either manually or with an egg slicer).

 

 

The Blumenthal method
Chef Heston Blumenthal, after “relentless trials”, published a formula for “the perfect boiled egg” that explains how much water to use, how much time to cook and how much time to rest the egg.

Soft-boiled eggs are not recommended for people who may be susceptible to salmonella, such as very young children, the elderly, and those with weakened immune systems. To avoid the issue of salmonella, eggs can be pasteurised in shell at 57C for an hour and 15 minutes. The eggs can then be soft-boiled as normal.

Serving
Soft-boiled eggs are commonly served in egg cups, where the top of the egg is cut off with a knife, spoon, spring-loaded egg topper, or egg scissors, using a teaspoon to scoop the egg out. Other methods include breaking the eggshell by tapping gently around the top of the shell with a spoon. Soft-boiled eggs can be eaten with toast cut into strips, which are then dipped into the runny yolk. In the United Kingdom and Australia, these strips of toast are known as “soldiers”.

In Southeast Asia, especially countries like Malaysia, Singapore and the Philippines, a variation of soft-boiled eggs known as half-boiled eggs are commonly eaten at breakfast. The major difference is that, instead of the egg being served in an egg cup, it is cracked into a bowl to which dark or light soy sauce and/or pepper are added. The egg is also cooked for a shorter period of time resulting in a runnier egg instead of the usual gelatin state and is commonly eaten with Kaya toast.

Boiled eggs are also an ingredient in various Philippine dishes, such as embutido, pancit, relleno, galantina, and many others.

In Japan, soft-boiled eggs are commonly served alongside ramen. The eggs are typically steeped in a mixture of soy sauce, mirin, and water after being boiled and peeled. This provides the egg a brownish color that would otherwise be absent from boiling and peeling the eggs alone. Once the eggs have finished steeping, they are served either in the soup or on the side.

 

 

Hard-boiled eggs are boiled for longer than soft-boiled eggs, long enough for the yolk to solidify. They can be eaten warm or cold. Hard-boiled eggs are the basis for many dishes, such as egg salad, Cobb salad and Scotch eggs, and may be further prepared as deviled eggs.

Hard-boiled eggs are commonly sliced, particularly for use in sandwiches. For this purpose specialized egg slicers exist, to ease slicing and yield even slices.

There are several theories as to the proper technique of hard-boiling an egg. One method is to bring water to a boil and cook for ten minutes. Another method is to bring the water to a boil, but then remove the pan from the heat and allow eggs to cook in the gradually cooling water. Over-cooking eggs will typically result in a thin green iron(II) sulfide coating on the yolk. This reaction occurs more rapidly in older eggs as the whites are more alkaline. Immersing the egg in cold water after boiling is a common method of halting the cooking process to prevent this effect. It also causes a slight shrinking of the contents of the egg.

Hard-boiled eggs should be used within two hours if kept at room temperature or can be used for a week if kept refrigerated and in the shell.

 

 

A boiled egg, presented in an eggcup

A boiled egg, presented in an eggcup

Hard-boiled eggs can vary widely in how easy it is to peel away the shells. In general, the fresher an egg before boiling, the more difficult it is to separate the shell cleanly from the egg white. As a fresh egg ages, it gradually loses both moisture and carbon dioxide through pores in the shell; as a consequence, the contents of the egg shrink and the pH of the albumen becomes more basic. Albumen with higher pH (more basic) is less likely to stick to the egg shell, while pockets of air develop in eggs that have lost significant amounts of moisture, also making eggs easier to peel. Adding baking soda to the boiling water can help make it easier to peel the eggs. Keeping the cooked eggs soaked in water helps keep the membrane under the egg shell moisturized for easy peeling. Peeling the egg under running water is another effective method of removing the shell. Starting the cooking in hot water also makes the egg easier to peel. Another method: after plunging the eggs in cold water when they’re done, place them back in the hot water they were boiled in for 20 seconds, then return them to the cold water. The theory is that the shells expand and contract, loosening their bond.

 

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Shakshouka

June 29, 2015 at 5:26 AM | Posted in Meatless Monday, PBS | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is a Shakshouka. It’s from the PBS Recipe website. Find all your recipes here of all cuisines and tastes. http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/

 

 

Shakshouka

Shakshouka is a Tunisian recipe of eggs poached in tomato sauce.
IngredientsPBS3
3 Tbsp olive oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
2 large cloves garlic, finely chopped
About 8 tomatoes, preferably roma paste tomatoes but any will do (or about 2 x 14 oz can of chopped tomatoes)
2 tsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp ground caraway
2 tsp paprika (can be smoked paprika for added flavor)
1/8 tsp cayenne pepper (optional, or add more if you like it spicy)
1/2 tsp salt (more, to taste)
1/4 tsp black pepper
4 large pasture-raised eggs
2 to 3 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley (for garnish)
Directions
1 – Place a large skillet on medium heat and sauté the chopped onions in the olive oil for about 5 minutes, or until soft. Add the chopped garlic and continue cooking for another 2 minutes. Add all the spices, stir, and cook for another minute.
2 – Chop the tomatoes (preferably removing the seeds) and add them into the skillet, cooking for about 10 to 15 minutes, or until the sauce has started to thicken. If the sauce if too thick, add about 1/4 cup of water, stir, and cook for another couple minutes. You don’t want your sauce to be too thick, so that the eggs will poach well. On the other hand, you don’t want it to be too liquidey or the flavors will be diluted. Taste the sauce and add more salt, if needed.
3 – Once your sauce is just right, carefully crack the 4 eggs on top of the sauce, leaving a space between each one. (If there’s room, you might be able to fit an additional 2 or 3 eggs into the sauce). Put a lid on the skillet, and allow the eggs to cook for about 5 minutes, checking them often so that the yolk reaches the state that you prefer. (In Tunisia, the yolk is usually soft, but if you prefer a cooked yolk, simply cook it a bit longer).
4 – Once the eggs are cooked to your liking, remove the skillet from heat, and sprinkle the chopped parsley on top of the eggs. Serve hot, with a good slice of bread to soak up all the delicious tomato sauce.

 

http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/shakshouka-2/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 11, 2014 at 5:19 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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The fresher the egg, the better it is for poaching. The white will be firmer and will help keep the yolk from breaking. In addition, salt, lemon juice, and vinegar will make eggs coagulate faster. Add a dash of one of these ingredients to the poaching liquid to help keep their shape.

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