Asian Food Fest 2019 May 11th and 12th – Freedom Way at The Banks, Cincinnati, Ohio

May 9, 2019 at 1:40 PM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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Asian Food Fest 2019
Where: The Banks, Freedom Way between Elm and Walnut streets
When: noon-10 p.m. May 11, noon-8 p.m. May 12
Price: It’s free, the dishes cost $2-$6
Free Admission!

New this year, the Asian Food Fest will be located on Freedom Way between Elm and Walnut Streets!

Features authentic food from mostly all countries from Asia including Vietnam, Philippines, Malaysia, India, Korea, Japan and many more. Chef Hideki Harada and his wife will be serving up some Japanese delights while Pho Lang Thang will be going back to its roots of the first food fest and will be dishing out some Pho!    https://www.asianfoodfest.org/

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One of America’s Favorites – Scrambled Eggs

September 9, 2013 at 8:59 AM | Posted in breakfast, diabetes friendly, Egg Beaters, Eggs, One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Scrambled eggs with fingerling potatoes and bacon

Scrambled eggs with fingerling potatoes and bacon

Scrambled eggs is a dish made from whites and yolks of eggs (usually chicken eggs).
Eggs are poured into a hot greased pan and coagulate almost immediately. The heat is turned down to low and the eggs are constantly stirred as they cook. The pan and the stirring implement, if kept in constant motion, create small and soft curds of egg.
Once the liquid has mostly set, additional ingredients such as ham, herbs, cheese or cream may be folded in over low heat, just until incorporated. The eggs should be slightly undercooked when removed from heat, since the eggs will continue to set. If this technique is followed, the eggs should be moist in texture with a creamy consistency. If any liquid is seeping from the eggs, this is a sign of undercooking or adding under cooked high-moisture vegetables.

 

 

In another “Escoffier” method a double boiler or au Bain Marie is used as the heating source, which does not need adjustment as the direct heating method would. The eggs are directly placed in the cooker and whisked during the heating and not before. Cooking by this method prevents the eggs from browning while being cooked and gives creamy scrambled eggs. This method was used in the “old classical kitchen” and guarantees the eggs are always cooked perfectly, but it is somewhat more time-consuming than the regular method, taking up to 40 minutes to ensure perfect quality.
Scrambled eggs may also be made in a stove by placing the ingredients in a metal bowl and alternately cooking and stirring until the desired consistency is achieved, with the whites, and yellow scrambled together.
It is also possible to make scrambled eggs in a microwave oven, by cooking the eggs for short bursts, stopping regularly to stir. This allows rapid preparation, but care is required to avoid overcooking and the resulting texture may be inferior to a more traditional preparation method.
Scrambled eggs can be made easily sous vide, which gives a much smoother texture more similar to custard and requires only occasionally mixing during cooking.
Another technique for cooking creamy scrambled eggs is to pipe steam into eggs with butter via a steam wand (as found on an espresso machine).

 

 

Scrambled eggs with bacon

Scrambled eggs with bacon

Classical haute cuisine preparation calls for serving scrambled eggs in a deep silver dish. They can also be presented in small croustades made from hollowed-out brioche or tartlets. When eaten for breakfast, scrambled eggs often accompany toast, bacon, smoked salmon, hash browns, pancakes, ham or sausages. Popular condiments served with scrambled eggs include ketchup, hot sauce, and Worcestershire sauce.

 

 

Variations of scrambled egg dishes

* scrambled eggs à l’arlésienne – with zucchini (courgette) pulp and a concentrated garlic-flavored tomato fondue served in hollowed-out courgettes and sprinkled with Parmesan cheese.
* scrambled eggs à l’américaine – with pan-fried smoked bacon, garnished with slices of broiled bacon and small grilled tomato halves.
* egg bhurji – Indian variant of scrambled eggs. Additions include onions, green chili, chopped ginger, turmeric powder and chopped tomatoes. Sprinkled with chopped green coriander and eaten with roti. Another variant of egg bhurji is the Parsi akuri.
* Soy scrambled eggs – mixed with soy sauce and often eaten with congee.
* scrambled eggs with sucuk or pastırma; sucuklu yumurta and pastırmalı yumurta respectively – Scrambled eggs are mixed with Turkish beef sausages, or dried cured beef. It is cooked in a sahan with butter or olive oil. Some tomato can be added. In Turkey and Egypt it is eaten regularly for breakfast.
* scrambled eggs with digüeñes – a variation from Chilean cuisine in which the eggs are fried together with the native fungus Cyttaria espinosae.
* migas – a Tex-Mex dish (not to be confused with the Iberian dish of the same name) consisting of scrambled eggs augmented with strips of corn tortilla, to which vegetables and meat may be added.
* Stir-fried tomato and scrambled eggs – a very common main course in China. It is quickly and easily prepared, and so is a favourite among teens and university students[citation needed]. This is also eaten in the Philippines.
* Onions and scrambled eggs – another variant of scrambled eggs eaten in the Philippines. The onions are either fried first then the egg mixture is poured over them to cook, or the onions are mixed with the egg mixture and then poured over the pan.

Quail Eggs, Turkey Sausage Links, and Whole Grain English Muffin

May 24, 2012 at 10:05 AM | Posted in Bob Evan's, breakfast, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, low calorie, low carb, Turkey Sausage links | 1 Comment
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Had a first for breakfast this morning, Quail Eggs! I picked these up at Jungle Jim’s yesterday. I had always wanted to try them and they had plenty in stock. To open the Egg you have to take a knife and carefully puncture the big part of the Egg at the top. Then remove the top of the Egg so you can pour the Egg out of it’s shell into the skillet. If you fry it, which is what I did, it will fry in about 45 seconds. They are the perfect size for you English Muffin! I’ll try them a differnt way tomorrow for breakfast. I had Bob Evans Turkey Sausage Links and a Healthy Life Whole Grain English Muffin also.

A little background on the Quail Egg!

Quail eggs are considered a delicacy in many countries, including western Europe and North America. In Japanese cuisine, they are sometimes used raw or cooked as tamago in sushi and often found in bento lunches.

In some other countries, quail eggs are considered less exotic. In Colombia and Venezuela, a single hard-boiled quail egg is a common topping on hot dogs and hamburgers, often fixed into place with a toothpick. In the Philippines, kwek-kwek is a popular street food delicacy, which consists of soft-boiled quail eggs dipped in orange-colored batter before being skewered and deep-fried. In Vietnam, bags of boiled quail eggs are sold on street stalls as inexpensive beer snacks.

Quail eggs are often believed to be very high in cholesterol, but evidence shows their cholesterol levels are similar to chicken eggs.

Healthier Quail Eggs

A few other facts about Quail eggs from the Healthier Quail Eggs web site. I left the link to the site at the bottom of the post.

Few foods can claim the nutritional value and of a quail egg. As an enriched source of anti-oxidants, essential fatty acids, and Vitamin B Riboflavin, it’s often the natural food of choice for medical cures, relief from inflammatory diseases and strengthening our immunity systems. These and other food nutrients further contribute to brain development, sexual potency, glowing skin and healthy hair. And it does this with practically no carbs, no bad cholesterol and food spoilage. Now imagine all of this from a product known for its 5-star elegance and cultural exquisiteness.

Quail eggs improve skin color and strengthen hair. That’s why quail eggs are used for egg yolk facial and hair care masks. Its Vitamin B2 Riboflavin provides glowing and healthy skin, while the Vitamins A, B and E give your child shiny and voluminous hair. All this from a 100% natural alternative to harmful hair and skin care chemicals. Quail eggs are also rich in ovomucoidproteins, antioxidants and lysozyme. As a sugar-free, non-processed source of these nutrients, this makes quail eggs ideal for controlling infections and inflammations leading to asthma, allergies, eczema and psoriasis.

As an alkaline forming product, quail eggs have been prescribed as a dietary remedy against tract disorders such as gastritusand ulcers. Along with its enriched source of antioxidants, magnesium, Vitamin B6 and potassium, the quail egg can remove stones formed in the kidneys, liver and gall bladder. They also have the nutrients and properties to help give you the needed energy, resistance from illness, and faster recovery following surgery or from chemotherapy effects and other cancer treatments. Finally, as a low carb, low calorie food, quail eggs are ideal as a non-invasive approach to heart conditions and diabetes treatment. Finally, as a 100% natural source of iron, Vitamin A & B12, quail eggs can greatly benefit those suffering from anemia.

http://healthierquaileggs.com/

Fruit of the Week – Custard Apple

December 12, 2011 at 1:40 PM | Posted in baking, Food, fruits | 1 Comment
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The custard-apple, also called bullock’s heart or bull’s heart, is the fruit of the tree Annona reticulata. This tree is a small deciduous or semi-evergreen tree sometimes reaching 33 ft tall and a native of the tropical New World that prefers low elevations, and a warm,

Cross Section of Custard Apple

humid climate. It also occurs as feral populations in many parts of the world including Southeast Asia, Taiwan, India, Australia, and Africa.

The fruits are variable in shape, oblong, or irregular. The size ranges from 2.8 in to 4.7 in. When ripe, the fruit is brown or yellowish, with red highlights and a varying degree of reticulation, depending on variety. The flavor is sweet and pleasant, akin to the taste of ‘traditional’ custard.

The custard apple is believed to be a native of the West Indies but it was carried in early times through Central America to southern Mexico. It has long been cultivated and naturalized as far south as Peru and Brazil. It is commonly grown in the Bahamas and occasionally in Bermuda and southern Florida.

Apparently it was introduced into tropical Africa early in the 17th century and it is grown in South Africa as a dooryard fruit tree. In India the tree is cultivated, especially around Calcutta, and runs wild in many areas. It has become fairly common on the east coast of Malaya, and more or less throughout southeast Asia and the Philippines though nowhere particularly esteemed. Eighty years ago it was reported as thoroughly naturalized in Guam. In Hawaii it is not well known.

The custard apple tree needs a tropical climate but with cooler winters than those of the west coast of Malaya. It flourishes in the coastal lowlands of Ecuador; is rare above 5,000 ft (1,500 m). In Guatemala, it is nearly always found below 4,000 ft (1,220 m). In India, it does well from the plains up to an elevation of 4,000 ft (1,220 m); in Ceylon, it cannot be grown above 3,000 ft (915 m). Around Luzon in the Philippines, it is common below 2,600 ft (800 m). It is too tender for California and trees introduced into

custard apple

Palestine succumbed to the cold. In southem Florida the leaves are shed at the first onset of cold weather and the tree is dormant all winter. Fully grown, it has survived temperatures of 27º to 28ºF (-2.78º to 2.22ºC) without serious harm. This species is less drought-tolerant than the sugar apple and prefers a more humid atmosphere.

The custard apple has the advantage of cropping in late winter and spring when the preferred members of the genus are not in season. It is picked when it has lost all green color and ripens without splitting so that it is readily sold in local markets. If picked green, it will not color well and will be of inferior quality. The tree is naturally a fairly heavy bearer. With adequate care, a mature tree will produce 75 to 100 lbs (34-45 kg) of fruits per year. The short twigs are shed after they have borne flowers and fruits.

In India, the fruit is eaten only by the lower classes, out-of-hand. In Central America, Mexico and the West Indies, the fruit is appreciated by all. When fully ripe it is soft to the touch and the stem and attached core can be easily pulled out. The flesh may be scooped from the skin and eaten as is or served with light cream and a sprinkling of sugar. Often it is pressed through a sieve and added to milk shakes, custards or ice cream.

The leaves have been employed in tanning and they yield a blue or black dye. A fiber derived from the young twigs is superior to the bark fiber from Annona squamosa. Custard apple wood is yellow, rather soft, fibrous but durable, moderately close-grained, with a specific gravity of 0.650. It has been used to make yokes for oxen.

The leaf decoction is given as a vermifuge. Crushed leaves or a paste of the flesh may be poulticed on boils, abscesses and ulcers. The unripe fruit is rich in tannin; is dried, pulverized and employed against diarrhea and dysentery. The bark is very astringent and the decoction is taken as a tonic and also as a remedy for diarrhea and dysentery. In severe cases, the leaves, bark and green fruits are all boiled together for 5 minutes in a liter of water to make an exceedingly potent decoction. Fragments of the root bark are packed around the gums to relieve toothache. The root decoction is taken as a febrifuge.

Fruit of the Week – Bitter Gourd

November 28, 2011 at 12:55 PM | Posted in dessert, Food, fruits | 2 Comments
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Momordica charantia, called bitter melon or bitter gourd in English, is a tropical and subtropical vine of the family Cucurbitaceae,

Bitter melon fruit, cleaned and sliced for cooking.

widely grown in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean for its edible fruit, which is among the most bitter of all fruits. There are many varieties that differ substantially in the shape and bitterness of the fruit. This is a plant of the tropics, but its original native range is unknown.

This herbaceous, tendril-bearing vine grows to 5 meters. It bears simple, alternate leaves 4–12 cm across, with 3–7 deeply separated lobes. Each plant bears separate yellow male and female flowers. In the Northern Hemisphere, flowering occurs during June to July and fruiting during September to November.

The fruit has a distinct warty exterior and an oblong shape. It is hollow in cross-section, with a relatively thin layer of flesh surrounding a central seed cavity filled with large flat seeds and pith. The fruit is most often eaten green, or as it is beginning to turn yellow. At this stage, the fruit’s flesh is crunchy and watery in texture, similar to cucumber, chayote or green bell pepper, but bitter. The skin is tender and edible. Seeds and pith appear white in unripe fruits; they are not intensely bitter and can be removed before cooking.

As the fruit ripens, the flesh becomes tougher, more bitter, and too distasteful to eat. On the other hand, the pith becomes sweet and intensely red; it can be eaten uncooked in this state, and is a popular ingredient in some southeast Asian salads.

When the fruit is fully ripe it turns orange and mushy, and splits into segments which curl back dramatically to expose seeds covered

China phenotype

in bright red pulp.

Bitter melon comes in a variety of shapes and sizes. The China phenotype is 20–30 cm long, oblong with bluntly tapering ends and pale green in color, with a gently undulating, warty surface. The bitter melon more typical of India has a narrower shape with pointed ends, and a surface covered with jagged, triangular “teeth” and ridges. It is green to white in color. Between these two extremes are any number of intermediate forms. Some bear miniature fruit of only 6–10 cm in length, which may be served individually as stuffed vegetables. These miniature fruit are popular in India and elsewhere in Southeast Asia.

Bitter melon is generally consumed cooked in the green or early yellowing stage. The young shoots and leaves of the bitter melon may also be eaten as greens.

Bitter melon is often used in Chinese cooking for its bitter flavor, typically in stir-fries (often with pork and douchi), soups, and also as tea. It has also been used in place of hops as the bittering ingredient in some Chinese beers.

It is very popular throughout South Asia. In Northern India, it is often prepared with potatoes and served with yogurt on the side to offset the bitterness, or used in sabji. In North Indian cuisine it is stuffed with spices and then cooked in oil. In Southern India it is used in the dishes thoran/thuvaran (mixed with grated coconut), theeyal (cooked with roasted coconut) and pachadi (which is considered a medicinal food for diabetics). Other popular recipes include preparations with curry, deep fried with peanuts or other ground nuts, and pachi pulusu, a soup with fried onions and other spices.In Tamil Nadu a special preparation in Brahmins’ cuisine called ‘pagarkai pitla’.

In Pakistan and Bangladesh, bitter melon is often cooked with onions, red chili powder, turmeric powder, salt, coriander powder, and a pinch of cumin seeds. Another dish in Pakistan calls for whole, unpeeled bitter melon to be boiled and then stuffed with cooked ground beef, served with either hot tandoori bread, naan, chappati, or with khichri (a mixture of lentils and rice).

Bitter melon is a significant ingredient in Okinawan cuisine, and is increasingly used in mainland Japan. It is popularly credited with

A small green bitter melon

Okinawan life expectancies being higher than the already long Japanese ones.

In Indonesia, bitter melon is prepared in various dishes, such as gado-gado, and also stir fried, cooked in coconut milk, or steamed.

In Vietnam, raw bitter melon slices consumed with dried meat floss and bitter melon soup with shrimp are popular dishes. Bitter melons stuffed with ground pork are served as a popular summer soup in the South. It is also used as the main ingredient of “stewed bitter melon”. This dish is usually cooked for the Tết holiday, where its “bitter” name is taken as a reminder of the poor living conditions experienced in the past.

In the Philippines, bitter melon may be stir-fried with ground beef and oyster sauce, or with eggs and diced tomato. The dish pinakbet, popular in the Ilocos region of Luzon, consists mainly of bitter melons, eggplant, okra, string beans, tomatoes, lima beans, and other various regional vegetables altogether stewed with a little bagoong-based stock.

In Nepal, bitter melon is prepared as a fresh pickle called achar. For this the bitter gourd is cut into cubes or slices and sautéed covered in oil and a sprinkle of water. When it is softened and reduced, it is minced in a mortar with a few cloves of garlic, salt and a red or green pepper. It is also sauteed to golden-brown, stuffed, or as a curry on its own or with potatoes.

In Trinidad and Tobago, bitter melons are usually sauteed with onion, garlic and scotch bonnet pepper until almost crisp.

Bitter melon has been used in various Asian and African traditional medicine systems for a long time.in Turkey it has been used as a folk remedy for a variety of ailments, particularly stomach complaints. The fruit is broken up and soaked in either olive oil or honey.

In 1962, Lolitkar and Rao extracted from the plant a substance, which they called charantin, which had hypoglycaemic effect on normal and diabetic rabbits. Another principle, active only on diabetic rabbits, was isolated by Visarata and Ungsurungsie in 1981. Bitter melon has been found to increase insulin sensitivity. In 2007, a study by the Philippine Department of Health determined that a daily dose of 100 mg per kilogram of body weight is comparable to 2.5 mg/kg of the anti-diabetes drug glibenclamide taken twice per day. Tablets of bitter melon extract are sold in the Philippines as a food supplement and exported to many countries.

Other compounds in bitter melon have been found to activate the AMPK, the protein that regulates glucose uptake (a process which is impaired in diabetics

Bitter melon also contains a lectin that has insulin-like activity due to its non-protein-specific linking together to insulin receptors. This lectin lowers blood glucose concentrations by acting on peripheral tissues and, similar to insulin’s effects in the brain, suppressing appetite. This lectin is likely a major contributor to the hypoglycemic effect that develops after eating bitter melon.

Two compounds extracted from bitter melon, α-eleostearic acid (from seeds) and 15,16-dihydroxy-α-eleostearic acid (from the fruit) have been found to induce apoptosis of leukemia cells in vitro. Diets containing 0.01% bitter melon oil (0.006% as α-eleostearic acid) were found to prevent azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

Researchers at Saint Louis University claims that an extract from bitter melon, commonly eaten and known as karela in India, causes a chain of events which helps to kill breast cancer cells and prevents them from multiplying.

Bitter melon has been used in traditional medicine for several other ailments, including dysentery, colic, fevers, burns, painful menstruation, scabies and other skin problems. It has also been used as abortifacient, for birth control, and to help childbirth.

Adobo – Filipino Cuisine

August 12, 2011 at 12:37 PM | Posted in chicken, Food | 2 Comments
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Adobo is the name of a popular dish and cooking process in Philippine cuisine that involves meat or seafood marinated in a sauce of vinegar and garlic, browned in oil, and simmered in the marinade.

Although it has a name taken from the Spanish, the cooking method is indigenous to the Philippines. When the Spa

Chicken Adobo

nish conquered the Philippines in the late 16th century and early 17th century, they encountered an indigenous cooking process which involved stewing with vinegar, which they then referred to as adobo, which is the Spanish word for seasoningor marinade. Dishes prepared in this manner eventually came to be known by this name, with the original term for the dish now lost to history.

While the adobo dish and cooking process in Filipino cuisine and the general description adobo in Spanish cuisine share similar characteristics, they refer to different things with different cultural roots. While the Philippine adobo dish can be considered adobo in the Spanish sense—a marinated dish—the Philippine usage is much more specific. Typically, pork or chicken, or a combination of both, is slowly cooked in vinegar, crushed garlic, bay leaf, black peppercorns, and soy sauce then often browned in the oven or pan-fried afterward to get the desirable crisped edges.

Adobo has been called the quintessential Philippine stew, served with rice both at daily meals and at feasts. It is commonly packed for Filipino mountaineers and travelers because it keeps well without refrigeration. Its relatively long shelf-life is due to one of its primary ingredients, vinegar, which inhibits the growth of bacteria.

Outside of the home-cooked dish, the essence of adobo has been developed commercially and adapted to other foods. A number of successful local Philippine snack products usually mark their items “adobo flavored.” This assortment includes, but is not limited to nuts, chips, noodle soups, and corn crackers.

Filipino Chicken Adobo

Ingredients

o 1 (3 1/2 lb) whole chickens ( one whole chicken, with all the parts is my favorite, but legs and thighs also are really great)
o 1 -2 cinnamon sticks
o 3 tablespoons peppercorns ( can adjust if desired)
o 6 garlic cloves, crushed ( adjust to taste, but sometimes  go extra and use an entire bulb)
o 3 bay leaves
o 1 cup soy sauce
o 1 cup distilled white vinegar or 1 cup rice vinegar or 1 cup coconut vinegar
o 3/4 cup white sugar
o 2 cups water ( adjust up or down as mentioned)

Directions

1. Place the liquid ingredients in a pot, starting with about half the amount of sugar. Taste and adjust the seasonings, the vinegar flavor will lessen during cooking, but if it is too sweet or too tart it’s easier to adjust the sugar now than trying to adjust the other flavors at the end of the cooking to your preference.
2. Add the cinnamon stick, peppercorns, garlic, bay leaves and chicken. If you don’t want the seasonings in the final dish you can wrap them up in cheesecloth, but usually they’re all left loose. Pack the chicken fairly tightly in the pot and if the chicken is not covered in liquid add water, often I add about 2 cups of water. The water can also help make the flavor less intense if the vinegar is too strong.
3. Simmer on medium low for about 1 hour, or until the chicken is cooked through. I often leave it until the chicken is pretty much falling off the bones. Add water if you would like to thin out the sauce during cooking. This can also be done in a slow cooker that you start in the morning and leave on low for 6 hours. The meat will fall off the bone, but that just makes it easier to get at it all!
4. Serve over rice with the sauce. One other addition I have made, though not traditional I believe is red pepper flakes (about 1 tsp) to the seasonings.

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