Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Bacon Blue Burger

July 3, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – is a Buffalo Bacon Blue Burger. Made using Wild Idea Ground Buffalo and the Wild Idea Buffalo Bacon along with Mustard, Ketchup, Thyme, Salt, Pepper, Blue Cheese, Chokecherry or Plum Preserves and Hamburger Buns. Fantastic combination of ingredients! You can find this recipe or purchase the Ground Buffalo and the Buffalo Bacon along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

Buffalo Bacon Blue Burgers
The quintessential Buffalo Burger, complete with Buffalo Bacon, Blue Cheese and a touch of fruit preserves! This – soon to be new favorite, will have you making it again, and again and again. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

2 – 1 lb. Ground Buffalo
3 – tablespoons olive oil, plus a little more
1/2 – teaspoon mustard
2 – teaspoon ketchup
1/2 – teaspoon thyme
2 – teaspoon salt & pepper
1 – 10 oz. package Buffalo Bacon
6 – ounces blue cheese
½ – cup chokecherry or plum preserves, warmed
6 – hamburger buns

Preparation:

1 – Mix 2 tablespoons olive oil, mustard, ketchup, thyme, salt and pepper together.
2 – Mix above with Ground Buffalo until well incorporated.
3 – Divide into 6 portions and at pat out into bun size patties.
4 – In large skillet over medium high heat, add the other tablespoon of olive oil. Place buffalo bacon in pan and cook until crispy or desired doneness, turning once during cooking time.
5 – Preheat grill to high heat, 500 degrees. Insure grill grates are clean.
6 – Brush burgers with a little oil and place on grill. Close grill lid during grilling time. Grill for 1.5 minutes then turn. Repeat again on each side, grilling for a total of 6 minutes.
7 – After the last turn, top the burgers with blue cheese. Close lid and grill for an additional 3 minutes.
8 – Remove burgers from heat, cover and allow them to rest for a few minutes.
9 – Place Buffalo Blue Burgers on bun, top with crispy bacon and drizzle with a little of the warmed preserves. Delicious!
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/favorite-summertime-recipes

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Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 26, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Bring on the Seasoning…………

Ground Beef alone makes a pretty dull-tasting Hamburger, so make sure the Meat is mixed throughout with at least Salt and Pepper. Other ingredients, like Worcestershire Sauce, Hot Sauce, Grated Onions, or Lipton Onion Soup Mix will improve not only the taste but also the juiciness of your Hamburgers.

Bison Filet Mignon w/ Oven Roasted Cauliflower and Roasted Butternut Squash

January 17, 2019 at 6:33 PM | Posted in bison, Buffalo Gal | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Bison Filet Mignon w/ Oven Roasted Cauliflower and Roasted Butternut Squash

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I Scrambled a couple of Eggs and toasted a couple of slices of Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. Also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. We had a mix of snow, sleet, and rain today. Had a high of 37 degrees. Bitter cold weather moving in over the weekend they say. After Breakfast I did a load of laundry and later cleaned and straightened the Pantry. I hired a an Awning and Roof Company to put braces underneath the top of the Car Port Awning. There’s been 4 houses where the Car Ports have crumbled because of the heavy wet snows. Plus it’s very old so hopefully this will prevent it from collapsing. For Dinner tonight its a Bison Filet Mignon w/ Oven Roasted Cauliflower and Roasted Butternut Squash.

 

 

 


When having Buffalo (Bison) I usually have Wild Idea Buffalo but tonight I tried the Buffalo Gal Bison Filet Mignon Steak. I had a Gift Certificate for Buffalo Gal so I thought I would give it a try. I prepared it the same way as I do the Wild Idea Buffalo. Salt, Pepper, Extra Light Olive Oil, and in a Cast Iron Skillet.

 

 

 

 

 


To prepare it I preheated the oven to 400°. In a Cast Iron Skillet that I sprayed with Pam Cooking Spray and added a tablespoon of Extra Light Olive Oil to, I heated it over medium high heat. When ready I added my Steaks to it. I cooked the Steaks 1 minute each side. I just wanted a light sear on both sides. Then I moved the Skillet on to the preheated Oven and Roasted it for about 4 minutes. Removed the Skillet from the Oven and placed the Steaks on a plate and let them rest for 5 minutes before cutting. Wow, what a juicy and tender Bison Steak! Excellent flavor, I will be having these again!

 

 

 

 

I had purchased a package of Cauliflower from Kroger the other day. We love Cauliflower, I just don’t prepare it near enough. To prepare it I’ll need; McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Peppercorn Medley, and Butter. Then to prepare it Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Spread the cauliflower on a baking sheet and season with salt and pepper. Roast in the oven, turning once with a spatula, until golden brown at the edges and cooked to desired tenderness, about 20 minutes or so. You can drizzle it with melted butter or a light coating of Wing Sauce before serving. Cauliflower is so delicious, even an easy recipe like this!

 


Then for one side I prepared some Roasted Butternut Squash, easy recipe for some delicious Butternut Squash! I purchased 1 small package of Diced Butternut Squash at Kroger. They sell packages of it that they dice up. This is a lot easier than peeling and seeding one yourself, especially if you don’t have a good knife to cut it. I’ll need; 1 package of Diced Butternut Squash, Walnut Pieces, Bacon Pieces, 1 tablespoons Extra Light Olive Oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons McCormick Grinder Sea Salt, and 1 teaspoon McCormick Grinder Peppercorn Medley.

 

 

 

 


To prepare it; Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Place the Squash on a sheet pan and drizzle with the Olive Oil, Salt, and Peppercorn and toss well. Arrange the squash in one layer and roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until the Squash is tender, turning once with a spatula. And done, very easy to prepare. With the small amount of Seasoning and Olive Oil, it really brings out the flavor of Butternut Squash! The Walnuts work perfect with the Squash. What a Meal! For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buffalo Gal Bison Filet Mignon Steaks
Our premium cut. . .so tender you can cut ’em with a fork. Receive 2 (7-9 oz.) steaks. (2 steaks per package, package is over 1 lb.)
Nutrition (6 oz.):
234 calories; 3.2 g fat; 105 mg cholesterol; 91.8 mg sodium

http://www.buffalogal.com/Bison-Filet-Mignon-Steaks-P37.aspx

http://www.buffalogal.com/Default.aspx

 

 

Butternut Squash Health Benefits………
Low in fat, butternut squash delivers an ample dose of dietary fiber, making it an exceptionally heart-friendly choice. It provides significant amounts of potassium, important for bone health, and vitamin B6, essential for the proper functioning of both the nervous and immune systems.

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Spanish Potato Skillet

May 7, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is a Spanish Potato Skillet. If you’re a Potato Lover like myself you’ll love this week’s recipe of Spanish Potato Skillet! White Potatoes, Onions, Eggs, Salt, Pepper, Hot Red Pepper Sauce, and Flat Leaf Parsley make up this Dish. Where’s the Meat? Who cares! It’s from one of my favorite Recipe Sites, the CooksRecipes website which has a huge selection of recipes to please all tastes and cuisines. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Spanish Potato Skillet

Recipe Ingredients:
1 1/3 pounds unpeeled potatoes, such as round reds or long whites (about 4 medium) cut into 1/8-inch thick slices
1/4 cup olive oil
1 large onion, thinly sliced
4 large eggs
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Several drops hot red pepper sauce
Chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley or chives (optional)

Cooking Directions:
1 – Put the potatoes into a large saucepan with enough salted water to cover. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat; cover and simmer for 8 minutes or until the potatoes are tender. Drain well.
2 – Meanwhile, heat half of the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté for 6 to 8 minutes, or until soft and golden; remove from heat.
3 – Beat the eggs, salt, black pepper and hot pepper sauce in a large bowl.
4 – Add the onion and potatoes to the eggs, tossing until mixed well. (It’s okay if some of the potato slices break.)
5 – Preheat the broiler.
6 – Heat the remaining oil in the same skillet over medium-high heat. Spread the potato mixture evenly and press it down lightly. Reduce the heat to medium and cook for about 4 minutes, or until bottom is golden brown, shaking the pan back and forth once or twice.
7 – Place the skillet under the broiler. (If the skillet handle is not oven-proof, wrap it in triple thickness of aluminum foil before placing it in the oven.) Broil 4 to 5 inches from the heat for 2 to 3 minutes or until the eggs are set. Watch carefully! Sprinkle with parsley. Cut into wedges; serve hot or warm.
Makes 4 servings.

https://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/spanish_potato_skillet_recipe.html

Diabetic Dish of the Week – BEEF AND ZUCCHINI APPETIZER MEATBALLS

February 6, 2018 at 6:32 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is – BEEF AND ZUCCHINI APPETIZER MEATBALLS. A combination of Ground Beef and Grated Zucchini along with Salt and Pepper make up these Meatballs. The recipe is from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. I love this site, having Diabetes 2 myself, it’s full of Diabetic Friendly Recipes! You can find Appetizers, Soups, Salads, Entrees, and Dessert recipes. Along with Diabetic News and Diabetes Management. So check it out today! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

 

BEEF AND ZUCCHINI APPETIZER MEATBALLS
Here’s an interesting combination for a meatball. This simple recipe is surprisingly great – and a real crowd-pleaser at parties and holiday get-togethers. It is also keto diet friendly.

NOTES:
Cooking times are for fresh or thoroughly thawed Ground Beef. Ground Beef should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160F. Color is not a reliable indicator of Ground Beef doneness.

Recipe Yield: 4 servings.

Ingredients

1 lb Ground Beef (93% or leaner)
1 cup grated zucchini
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Directions

1 – Preheat oven to 400F.
2 – Combine all ingredients in medium bowl, mixing lightly, but thoroughly.
3 – Shape into 24 meatballs.
4 – Place meatballs, 1-inch apart, on rack in aluminum foil lined broiler pan.
5 – Bake in 400F oven 22 to 25 minutes or until instant-read thermometer inserted into center of meatball registers 160F.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 163
Fat: 8 grams
Unsaturated Fat: 3 grams
Saturated Fat: 3 grams
Fiber: 0.3 grams
Sodium: 225 milligrams
Cholesterol: 75 milligrams
Protein: 23 grams
Carbohydrates: 1 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipe/beef-and-zucchini-appetizer-meatballs

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 23, 2017 at 6:15 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 1 Comment
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Saving time……..

 
Fill a large shaker with 6 parts salt and 1 part pepper for quick and easy seasoning.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 15, 2017 at 6:05 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Hold the salt and pepper……

 
Depending on the ingredients you’re adding, you don’t always know how much salt is going in. Many stocks have high levels of sodium, as do canned beans, vegetables and tomato paste. Taste and adjust with salt and pepper as needed at the end.

Pepper of the Week – Black Pepper

October 1, 2015 at 5:19 AM | Posted in Pepper of the Week | 1 Comment
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Pepper plant with immature peppercorns

Pepper plant with immature peppercorns

After going through the types of Apples list, it’s on to Peppers! Each week I’ll feature a different type of Pepper, through Wiki and various other sites for info. Starting off with Black Pepper. Spice it up!

 

 

Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. When dried, the fruit is known as a peppercorn. When fresh and fully mature, it is approximately 5 millimetres (0.20 in) in diameter, dark red, and, like all drupes, contains a single seed. Peppercorns, and the ground pepper derived from them, may be described simply as pepper, or more precisely as black pepper (cooked and dried unripe fruit), green pepper (dried unripe fruit) and white pepper (ripe fruit seeds).

Black pepper is native to south India, and is extensively cultivated there and elsewhere in tropical regions. Currently Vietnam is the world’s largest producer and exporter of pepper and producing 34% of the world’s Piper nigrum crop as of 2008.

Dried ground pepper has been used since antiquity for both its flavor and as a traditional medicine. Black pepper is the world’s most traded spice. It is one of the most common spices added to European cuisine and its descendants. The spiciness of black pepper is due to the chemical piperine, not to be confused with the capsaicin that gives fleshy peppers theirs. It is ubiquitous in the modern world as a seasoning and is often paired with salt.

 

The six variants of pepper

The six variants of pepper

Varieties

Black pepper
Black pepper is produced from the still-green, unripe drupes of the pepper plant. The drupes are cooked briefly in hot water, both to clean them and to prepare them for drying. The heat ruptures cell walls in the pepper, speeding the work of browning enzymes during drying. The drupes are dried in the sun or by machine for several days, during which the pepper around the seed shrinks and darkens into a thin, wrinkled black layer. Once dried, the spice is called black peppercorn. On some estates, the berries are separated from the stem by hand and then sun-dried without the boiling process.

Once the peppercorns are dried, pepper spirit and oil can be extracted from the berries by crushing them. Pepper spirit is used in many medicinal and beauty products. Pepper oil is also used as an ayurvedic massage oil and used in certain beauty and herbal treatments.

White pepper
“White pepper” redirects here. For the Ween album, see White Pepper.

White pepper grains
White pepper consists of the seed of the pepper plant alone, with the darker-colored skin of the pepper fruit removed. This is usually accomplished by a process known as retting, where fully ripe red pepper berries are soaked in water for about a week, during which the flesh of the pepper softens and decomposes. Rubbing then removes what remains of the fruit, and the naked seed is dried. Sometimes alternative processes are used for removing the outer pepper from the seed, including removing the outer layer through mechanical, chemical or biological methods.

Ground white pepper is often used in cream sauces, Chinese and Thai cuisine, and dishes like salad, light-colored sauces and mashed potatoes, where black pepper would visibly stand out. White pepper has a slightly different flavor from black pepper, due to the lack of certain compounds present in the outer fruit layer of the drupe, but not found in the seed. A slightly sweet version of white pepper from India is sometimes called safed golmirch (Hindi), shada golmorich (Bengali), or safed golmirch.

Green pepper
Green pepper, like black, is made from the unripe drupes. Dried green peppercorns are treated in a way that retains the green color, such as treatment with sulphur dioxide, canning or freeze-drying. Pickled peppercorns, also green, are unripe drupes preserved in brine or vinegar. Fresh, unpreserved green pepper drupes, largely unknown in the West, are used in some Asian cuisines, particularly Thai cuisine. Their flavor has been described as spicy and fresh, with a bright aroma. They decay quickly if not dried or preserved.

Wild pepper
Wild pepper grows in the Western Ghats region of India. Into the 19th century, the forests contained expansive wild pepper vines, as recorded by the Scottish physician Francis Buchanan (also a botanist and geographer) in his book A journey from Madras through the countries of Mysore, Canara and Malabar (Volume III). However, deforestation resulted in wild pepper growing in more limited forest patches from Goa to Kerala, with the wild source gradually decreasing as the quality and yield of the cultivated variety improved. No successful grafting of commercial pepper on wild pepper has been achieved to date.

Orange pepper and red pepper
Orange pepper or red pepper usually consists of ripe red pepper drupes preserved in brine and vinegar. Ripe red peppercorns can also be dried using the same color-preserving techniques used to produce green pepper.

Pink pepper and other plants used as pepper
Pink pepper from Piper nigrum is distinct from the more-common dried “pink peppercorns”, which are actually the fruits of a plant from a different family, the Peruvian pepper tree, Schinus molle, or its relative the Brazilian pepper tree, Schinus terebinthifolius. A pink peppercorn (French: baie rose, “pink berry”) is a dried berry of the shrub Schinus molle, commonly known as the Peruvian peppertree. As they are members of the cashew family, they may cause allergic reactions including anaphylaxis for persons with a tree nut allergy.

The bark of Drimys winteri (“Canelo” or “Winter’s Bark”) is used as a substitute for pepper in cold and temperate regions of Chile and Argentina where it is easily available.

In New Zealand the seeds of Kawakawa (Macropiper excelsum), a relative of black pepper, are sometimes used as pepper and the leaves of Pseudowintera colorata (mountain horopito) are another replacement for pepper.

Several plants in the United States are used also as pepper substitutes, such as Lepidium campestre, Lepidium virginicum, shepherd’s purse, horseradish, and field Pennycress.

 

Black and white peppercorns

Black and white peppercorns

Pepper is native to South Asia and Southeast Asia and has been known to Indian cooking since at least 2000 BCE. J. Innes Miller notes that while pepper was grown in southern Thailand and in Malaysia, its most important source was India, particularly the Malabar Coast, in what is now the state of Kerala Peppercorns were a much-prized trade good, often referred to as “black gold” and used as a form of commodity money. The legacy of this trade remains in some Western legal systems which recognize the term “peppercorn rent” as a form of a token payment made for something that is in fact being given.

The ancient history of black pepper is often interlinked with (and confused with) that of long pepper, the dried fruit of closely related Piper longum. The Romans knew of both and often referred to either as just “piper”. In fact, it was not until the discovery of the New World and of chili peppers that the popularity of long pepper entirely declined. Chili peppers, some of which when dried are similar in shape and taste to long pepper, were easier to grow in a variety of locations more convenient to Europe.

Before the 16th century, pepper was being grown in Java, Sunda, Sumatra, Madagascar, Malaysia, and everywhere in Southeast Asia. These areas traded mainly with China, or used the pepper locally. Ports in the Malabar area also served as a stop-off point for much of the trade in other spices from farther east in the Indian Ocean. Following the British hegemony in India, virtually all of the black pepper found in Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa was traded from Malabar region.

 

Black pepper grains

Black pepper grains

Pepper gets its spicy heat mostly from piperine derived both from the outer fruit and the seed. Black pepper contains between 4.6% and 9.7% piperine by mass, and white pepper slightly more than that. Refined piperine, by weight, is about one percent as hot as the capsaicin found in chili peppers. The outer fruit layer, left on black pepper, also contains important odor-contributing terpenes including pinene, sabinene, limonene, caryophyllene, and linalool, which give citrusy, woody, and floral notes. These scents are mostly missing in white pepper, which is stripped of the fruit layer. White pepper can gain some different odours (including musty notes) from its longer fermentation stage. The aroma of pepper is attributed to rotundone (3,4,5,6,7,8-Hexahydro-3α,8α-dimethyl-5α-(1-methylethenyl)azulene-1(2H)-one), a sesquiterpene originally discovered in the tubers of cyperus rotundus, which can be detected in concentrations of 0.4 nanograms/L in water and in wine: rotundone is also present in marjoram, oregano, rosemary, basil, thyme, and geranium, as well as in some Shiraz wines.

 

Herb and Spice of the Week – Pepper

March 5, 2015 at 6:33 AM | Posted in Herb and Spice of the Week | Leave a comment
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Black and white peppercorns

Black and white peppercorns

Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. The fruit, known as a peppercorn when dried, is approximately 5 millimetres (0.20 in) in diameter, dark red when fully mature, and, like all drupes, contains a single seed. Peppercorns, and the ground pepper derived from them, may be described simply as pepper, or more precisely as black pepper (cooked and dried unripe fruit), green pepper (dried unripe fruit) and white pepper (ripe fruit seeds).

 

 

Black pepper is native to south India, and is extensively cultivated there and elsewhere in tropical regions. Currently Vietnam is the world’s largest producer and exporter of pepper, producing 34% of the world’s Piper nigrum crop as of 2008.

Dried ground pepper has been used since antiquity for both its flavour and as a traditional medicine. Black pepper is the world’s most traded spice. It is one of the most common spices added to European cuisine and its descendants. The spiciness of black pepper is due to the chemical piperine, not to be confused with the capsaicin that gives fleshy peppers theirs. It is ubiquitous in the modern world as a seasoning, and is often paired with salt.

 

The 6 variants of Pepper

The 6 variants of Pepper

Black pepper
Black pepper is produced from the still-green unripe drupes of the pepper plant. The drupes are cooked briefly in hot water, both to clean them and to prepare them for drying. The heat ruptures cell walls in the pepper, speeding the work of browning enzymes during drying. The drupes are dried in the sun or by machine for several days, during which the pepper around the seed shrinks and darkens into a thin, wrinkled black layer. Once dried, the spice is called black peppercorn. On some estates, the berries are separated from the stem by hand and then sun-dried without the boiling process.

Once the peppercorns are dried, pepper spirit & oil can be extracted from the berries by crushing them. Pepper spirit is used in many medicinal and beauty products. Pepper oil is also used as an ayurvedic massage oil and used in certain beauty and herbal treatments.

White pepper
White pepper consists of the seed of the pepper plant alone, with the darker-colored skin of the pepper fruit removed. This is usually accomplished by a process known as retting, where fully ripe red pepper berries are soaked in water for about a week, during which the flesh of the pepper softens and decomposes. Rubbing then removes what remains of the fruit, and the naked seed is dried. Sometimes alternative processes are used for removing the outer pepper from the seed, including removing the outer layer through mechanical, chemical or biological methods.

Ground white pepper is often used in cream sauces, Chinese and Thai cuisine, and dishes like salad, light-colored sauces and mashed potatoes, where black pepper would visibly stand out. White pepper has a slightly different flavor than black pepper, due to the lack of certain compounds present in the outer fruit layer of the drupe, but not found in the seed. A slightly sweet version of white pepper from India is sometimes called Safed Golmirch (Hindi), Shada golmorich (Bengali), or Safed Golmirch (Punjabi).
Green pepper
Green pepper, like black, is made from the unripe drupes. Dried green peppercorns are treated in a way that retains the green color, such as treatment with sulphur dioxide, canning or freeze-drying. Pickled peppercorns, also green, are unripe drupes preserved in brine or vinegar. Fresh, unpreserved green pepper drupes, largely unknown in the West, are used in some Asian cuisines, particularly Thai cuisine. Their flavor has been described as spicy and fresh, with a bright aroma. They decay quickly if not dried or preserved.

Wild pepper
Wild pepper grows in the Western Ghats region of India. Into the 19th Century, the forests contained expansive wild pepper vines, as recorded by the Scottish physician Francis Buchanan, (also a botanist and geographer) in his book, A journey from Madras through the countries of Mysore, Canara and Malabar (Volume III). However, deforestation resulted in wild pepper growing in more limited forest patches from Goa to Kerala, with the wild source gradually decreasing as the quality and yield of the cultivated variety improved. No successful grafting of commercial pepper on wild pepper has been achieved to date.

Orange pepper and red pepper
Orange pepper or red pepper usually consists of ripe red pepper drupes preserved in brine and vinegar. Ripe red peppercorns can also be dried using the same color-preserving techniques used to produce green pepper.

Pink pepper and other plants used as pepper
Pink pepper from Piper nigrum is distinct from the more-common dried “pink peppercorns”, which are actually the fruits of a plant from a different family, the Peruvian pepper tree, Schinus molle, or its relative the Brazilian pepper tree, Schinus terebinthifolius. A pink peppercorn (French: baie rose, “pink berry”) is a dried berry of the shrub Schinus molle, commonly known as the Peruvian peppertree. As they are members of the cashew family, they may cause allergic reactions including anaphylaxis for persons with a tree nut allergy.

 

Pepper before ripening

Pepper before ripening

The bark of Drimys winteri (“Canelo” or “Winter’s Bark”) is used as a substitute for pepper in cold and temperate regions of Chile and Argentina where it is easily available.

In New Zealand the seeds of Kawakawa (Macropiper excelsum), a relative of black pepper, are sometimes used as pepper and the leaves of Pseudowintera colorata (mountain horopito) are another replacement for pepper.

Several plants in the United States are used also as pepper substitutes, such as Lepidium campestre, Lepidium virginicum, shepherd’s purse, horseradish, and field Pennycress.

 
Like many eastern spices, pepper was historically both a seasoning and a folk medicine. Long pepper, being stronger, was often the preferred medication, but both were used. Black Pepper (or perhaps long pepper) was believed to cure illness such as constipation, diarrhoea, earache, gangrene, heart disease, hernia, hoarseness, indigestion, insect bites, insomnia, joint pain, liver problems, lung disease, oral abscesses, sunburn, tooth decay, and toothaches. Various sources from the 5th century onward also recommend pepper to treat eye problems, often by applying salves or poultices made with pepper directly to the eye. There is no current medical evidence that any of these treatments has any benefit; pepper applied directly to the eye would be quite uncomfortable and possibly damaging. Nevertheless, black pepper, either powdered or its decoction, is widely used in traditional Indian medicine and as a home remedy for relief from sore throat, throat congestion, cough etc.

Pepper is known to cause sneezing. Some sources say that piperine, a substance present in black pepper, irritates the nostrils, causing the sneezing; Few, if any, controlled studies have been carried out to answer the question.

Piperine is under study for its potential to increase absorption of selenium, vitamin B, beta-carotene and curcumin as well as other nutrients. As a folk medicine, pepper appears in the Buddhist Samaññaphala Sutta, chapter five, as one of the few medicines allowed to be carried by a monk.

Pepper contains phytochemicals, including amides, piperidines, pyrrolidines and trace amounts of safrole which may be carcinogenic in laboratory rodents.

Piperine is under study for a variety of possible physiological effects, although this work is preliminary and mechanisms of activity for piperine in the human body remain unknown.

 
Pepper gets its spicy heat mostly from piperine derived both from the outer fruit and the seed. Black pepper contains between 4.6% and 9.7% piperine by mass, and white pepper slightly more than that. Refined piperine, by weight, is about one percent as hot as the capsaicin found in chili peppers. The outer fruit layer, left on black pepper, also contains important odour-contributing terpenes including pinene, sabinene, limonene, caryophyllene, and linalool, which give citrusy, woody, and floral notes. These scents are mostly missing in white pepper, which is stripped of the fruit layer. White pepper can gain some different odours (including musty notes) from its longer fermentation stage. The aroma of pepper is attributed to rotundone (3,4,5,6,7,8-Hexahydro-3α,8α-dimethyl-5α-(1-methylethenyl)azulene-1(2H)-one), a sesquiterpene originally discovered in the tubers of cyperus rotundus, which can be detected in concentrations of 0.4 nanograms/L in water and in wine: rotundone is also present in marjoram, oregano, rosemary, basil, thyme, and geranium, as well as in some Shiraz wines.

Pepper loses flavor and aroma through evaporation, so airtight storage helps preserve its spiciness longer. Pepper

Handheld pepper mills

Handheld pepper mills

can also lose flavor when exposed to light, which can transform piperine into nearly tasteless isochavicine. Once ground, pepper’s aromatics can evaporate quickly; most culinary sources recommend grinding whole peppercorns immediately before use for this reason. Handheld pepper mills or grinders, which mechanically grind or crush whole peppercorns, are used for this, sometimes instead of pepper shakers that dispense pre-ground pepper. Spice mills such as pepper mills were found in European kitchens as early as the 14th century, but the mortar and pestle used earlier for crushing pepper have remained a popular method for centuries as well.

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Bison Carpaccio

December 24, 2014 at 6:33 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Another delicious sounding appetizer recipe for the Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week, Bison Carpaccio. It’s from Jill O’Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo. http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

 

Bison Carpaccio *pronunciation: car-paht-cho
Wild Idea Buffalo premium, 100% grass-fed bison steaks turns this very simple to make, tasty appetizer into a fabulous showstopper! My preparation may make a few chefs gasp, as I sear the meat while still partially frozen, but it works perfectly, especially for preparing ahead when entertaining.

 
Ingredients:
2 – 10oz. Wild Idea Buffalo New York Strip SteaksBison Carpaccio
¼ – cup olive oil
1 – teaspoon salt
1 – teaspoon black pepper
2 – green onions, sliced
2 – tablespoons capers
2 – lemon wedges
sea salt and fresh cracked pepper

 

Preparation:
1) Remove partially thawed steaks (firm inside, softer outside) from their packaging, rinse under cold water, pat dry and trim all visible fat away from steaks.
2) On a plate rub steaks with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Allow steaks to rest for 15 minutes.
3) Turn exhaust fan on high and heat a heavy skillet, over high heat, the hottest heat you have. Place oiled steaks in hot pan and sear for 30 second on each side.
4) Remove steaks from the pan and place on a cutting board. Allow steaks to cool before slicing. Slice steaks into thin slices.
5) To plate, circle sliced onions an inch or two inside the plates parameter and arrange sliced steaks over the onions. Cover with plastic wrap until you are ready to serve. Right before serving, squeeze with lemon wedges and sprinkle with sea salt, a crack of black pepper and capers.

Serve with thin crinkle cut potato chips or the thinnest potato chips available. They make for a great vehicle to ones mouth.

 

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2014/appetizer-recipes-to-the-holiday-party-rescue/

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