Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 24, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Oh Nuts……….

Eating nuts on a regular basis may improve your health in many ways, such as by reducing diabetes and heart disease risk, as well as cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This nutritious high-fiber treat may even aid weight loss — despite its high calorie count. Almonds, macadamia nuts, hazelnuts and pecans also appear to be quite heart healthy. And peanuts — which are technically not a nut, but a legume, like beans — seem to be relatively healthy.

One of America’s Favorites – Peanut Butter Cookies

March 22, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 4 Comments
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Peanut butter cookies with peanut chunks

A peanut butter cookie is a type of cookie that is distinguished for having peanut butter as a principal ingredient. The cookie originated in the United States, its development dating back to the 1910s. If crunchy peanut butter is used, the resulting cookie may contain peanut fragments.

 

George Washington Carver (1864-1943), an American agricultural extension educator, from Alabama’s Tuskegee Institute, was the most well known promoter of the peanut as a replacement for the cotton crop, which had been heavily damaged by the boll weevil. He compiled 105 peanut recipes from various cookbooks, agricultural bulletins and other sources. In his 1925 research bulletin called How to Grow the Peanut and 105 Ways of Preparing it for Human Consumption, he included three recipes for peanut cookies calling for crushed or chopped peanuts.

It was not until the early 1930s that peanut butter was listed as an ingredient in the cookies.

Peanut butter fork scored cookies

Early peanut butter cookies were either rolled thin and cut into shapes, or else they were dropped and made into balls; they did not have fork marks. The first reference to the famous criss-cross marks created with fork tines was published in the Schenectady Gazette on July 1, 1932. The Peanut Butter Cookies recipe said: “shape into balls and after placing them on the cookie sheet, press each one down with a fork, first one way and then the other, so they look like squares on waffles.”

Pillsbury, one of the large flour producers, popularized the use of a fork in the 1930s. The Peanut Butter Balls recipe in the 1933 edition of Pillsbury’s Balanced Recipes instructed the cook to press the cookies using fork tines. These early recipes do not explain why the advice is given to use a fork, though. The reason is that peanut butter cookie dough is dense, and unpressed, each cookie will not cook evenly. Using a fork to press the dough is a convenience of tool; bakers can also use a cookie shovel (spatula).

Asian Vegetable and Soba Noodle Salad

March 7, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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I have a recipe for a Asian Vegetable and Soba Noodle Salad to pass along. Some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are Soba, Bell Peppers, Red Cabbage, Jicama, Peanuts, Sesame Oil, Rice Vinegar and more. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Asian Vegetable and Soba Noodle Salad

Ingredients
Preparation time: 25 minutes
Chilling time: 1 hour

5 ounces soba
3/4 cup coarsely sliced fresh red bell pepper
3/4 cup coarsely sliced fresh green bell pepper
1 cup sliced fresh red cabbage
1 cup peeled, matchstick-sliced fresh jicama
3/4 cup coarsely sliced green onions
3/4 cup matchstick-sliced unpeeled cucumber
1/4 cup chopped, unsalted peanuts
1 tablespoon sesame oil
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 cloves fresh garlic, minced
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Directions
Yield: 8 servings
Serving size: 1 cup

1 – Bring a medium pot of water to a boil. Add soba noodles, cover, and cook about 5 minutes until noodles are tender yet firm. Place noodles in strainer and rinse with cool water. In a large salad bowl, place sliced red pepper, green pepper, red cabbage, jicama, green onions, cucumber, and peanuts. Add cooled, drained noodles. In a small mixing bowl, whisk sesame oil, vinegar, minced garlic, soy sauce, and black pepper together. Pour dressing over salad and toss ingredients until they are well distributed. Chill for approximately 1 hour before serving.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 122 calories, Carbohydrates: 19 g, Protein: 4 g, Fat: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Sodium: 222 mg, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/salads/asian-vegetable-and-soba-noodle-salad/

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Inside every issue you’ll find…
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* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
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CHICKEN PAD THAI

February 28, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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I have a recipe for CHICKEN PAD THAI to pass along. To make this recipe some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are Chicken Breast, Honey, Chili Garlic Sauce, Peanut Butter, Zucchini, Pad Thai Stir-Fry Noodles, Bean Sprouts, Cabbage and more! Another Delicious and Healthy Recipe from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

CHICKEN PAD THAI
Recipe for Chicken Pad Thai with only 9 grams of carbs per serving from our diabetic Thai recipes area. Includes nutritional info for diabetes meal planning.
Peanuts are a low glycemic index food. Their slow digestion causes sugar to gradually be released into the blood, which can have positive effects on blood sugar control.
Substituting plant-based proteins like peanuts for animal proteins and low-quality carbohydrates can reduce diabetes risk by up to 21-percent.
This recipe is also a good source of Vitamin A (109%), Vitamin C (47%), iron (10%) and calcium (7%).

Ingredients

1 pound chicken breast
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon honey
2 teaspoons chili garlic sauce
3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon peanut butter
1/4 cup water
1 medium zucchini, spiralized (about 1 cup)
2 medium carrots, spiralized (about 1 cup)
1 cup cooked pad thai stir-fry noodles
1 cup bean sprouts
1 cup thinly sliced cabbage
1 lime, quartered
1/4 cup unsalted peanuts, crushed
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Directions

1 – Season chicken with pepper, to taste. In large, nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, heat olive oil and cook chicken until fully cooked and juices are clear.
2 – Remove chicken from pan and allow to rest 5 minutes before slicing.
3 – To make sauce: In small bowl, whisk together honey, chili garlic sauce, rice wine vinegar, soy sauce, peanut butter and water.
4 – Add zucchini, carrots, rice noodles and chicken to pan; pour sauce over and toss to coat.
5 – Toss in bean sprouts and cabbage.
6 – Serve with lime wedge, crushed peanuts and cilantro.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 295
Fat: 12 grams
Saturated Fat: 2 grams
Fiber: 4 grams
Sodium: 792 miligrams
Cholesterol: 60 miligrams
Protein: 27 grams
Carbohydrates: 22 grams
Sugars: 9 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipe/chicken-pad-thai

One of America’s Favorites – Mixed Nuts

December 14, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments
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A typical assortment of mixed nuts

Mixed nuts are a snack food consisting of any mixture of mechanically or manually combined nuts. Peanuts (actually a legume), almonds, walnuts, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts (filberts), and pecans are common constituents of mixed nuts. Mixed nuts may be salted, roasted, cooked, or blanched.

In addition to being eaten directly, mixed nuts can be used in cooking, such as for Tunisian farka, tarts, and toffee. Trail mix consists of nuts mixed with raisins and other dry ingredients.

 

 

In Japan, mixed nuts are the second most popular table nuts, behind sweet chestnuts; in the United States, they are second only to peanuts. Mixed nuts have also gained in popularity in the Argentinian market, which imported some $1.9 million in 1997, nearly half from the U.S. During the year 2002, U.S. companies sold $783 million of mixed nuts incorporating four or more varieties, mostly in canned form, representing hundreds of millions of pounds.

The individual nuts that make up mixed nuts are harvested from all over the world. As a Dallas Fed publication supporting free trade puts it,

Mixed nuts from a can

“In the average can of mixed nuts, you might find almonds from Italy, walnuts from China, Brazil nuts from Bolivia, cashews from India, pistachios from Turkey, hazelnuts from Canada—a true international assortment.”

This reality provides an incentive for nut salters to favor free trade for nuts, as opposed to nut farmers, who would generally support trade barriers. In fact, one historical argument for United States salters is that importing nuts can encourage domestic production, since mixed nuts provide a “wagon” on which everyone’s sales ride. For example, cashews are not produced in North America, and it is necessary to import them because mixed nuts are essential to the sale of pecans, which are grown exclusively in North America.

 

Because they are relatively inexpensive, peanuts are typically a major ingredient in mixed nuts, although they are viewed as less fancy than other nuts; often “deluxe mixed nuts” are advertised as containing no peanuts. Alrifai, a brand in the Middle East, Identifies the expensive nuts as kernels. In 2006, a batch of “deluxe” mixed nuts was recalled because peanuts had crept into the mix. The move was not to save face: peanuts are the ingredient of mixed nuts most commonly associated with life-threatening food allergies.

Less than 50% peanuts

Less dramatically, some mixed nuts advertise themselves to contain “less than 50% peanuts”. For a 60 Minutes segment that originally aired in 1997, Andy Rooney tested such a 12-ounce (340 g) can of Planters brand nuts, pleading boredom on a Saturday. He determined that “there was a tiny fraction less than six ounces of peanuts . . . amazing precision for a nut factory.” Later, in 2004, a cockeyed.com How much is inside? episode estimated that the peanut weight percentage in two such 11.5 oz cans was, in fact, a little over 50%.

Besides peanuts, cashews are usually the next least expensive nut, and in deluxe mixes they tend to be the most common ingredient. Hazelnuts and Brazil nuts are also “relatively cheap”, while pecans are the most expensive ingredient.

 

There are two different ways the nuts can be processed. The first is dry roasting, where heat is applied indirectly to the products. It is important that the nuts or seeds are stirred constantly to avoid over- and under-cooking. This method requires no additional ingredients. The second is oil frying, where the nuts go into preheated oil for a certain amount of time. There are various oil roasting methods from continuous, batch and curtain fryers. The ultimate impact on the nuts can vary; both methods are recommended by studies.

 

Percent composition by weight is a serious matter in the U.S., where mixed nuts have been regulated by the Food and Drug Administration since 1977. Up to that point, the phrase “mixed nuts” had been legally meaningless. A 1964 Consumer Reports investigation of 124 cans of mixed nuts, representing 31 brands bought in 17 American cities, determined that most mixed nuts of the time were mostly peanuts, often 75%; peanutless brands were usually dominated by cashews. Many cans bore misleading labels or were underfilled. Consumer Reports concluded, “What’s needed of course is a Federal standard of identity…”, detailing a list that of requirements that, with the exception of their desire to limit broken nuts, anticipated the 1977 rules.

On March 15, 1977, the FDA promulgated a new standard of identity for mixed nuts in 42 FR 14475. The present standard, as modified by 58 FR 2885, Jan. 6, 1993, requires that mixed nuts must contain at least four different varieties of tree nuts or peanuts. (Products with three or fewer varieties are now commonly labelled as simply “mixes”.) The container volume must be at least 85% filled, and the label must state whether any peanuts are unblanched or of the Spanish variety.

The most detailed section deals with weight percentages:

Brazil nuts ride on top of peanuts

“Each such kind of nut ingredient when used shall be present in a quantity not less than 2 percent and not more than 80 percent by weight of the finished food.”
Furthermore, if a variety X exceeds 50%, the label must conspicuously state “contains up to 60% X”, and so on in 10% increments up to 80%. (The first example given by the FDA is “contains up to 60% pecans”.) When testing mixed nuts for compliance, the FDA samples at least 24 pounds to reduce sampling error.

Modifying words like “fancy” or “choice” have not historically carried any legal meaning in the United States, and they remain absent from the current regulations. In a 1915 federal case against “fancy mixed nuts” that were argued by competitors to be an inferior grade, U. S. v. 25 Bags of Nuts, N. J. No. 4329 (1915), the court declined to accept a trade standard. The ruling said

“It seems to me that until the Department establishes a set standard of quality… it would be altogether unsafe… to make them amenable to such a vague and indefinite standard as I understand the Government seeks to establish by the testimony of men engaged in the business of handling nuts.”
Nutritional Benefits
A Harvard University Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Dr. Frank Hu, reports that recent studies found daily nut-eaters were less likely to die of cancer, heart disease and respiratory disease.

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – BISON CURRY

June 17, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | 1 Comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is a Bison Curry. To make this delicious dish you’ll be needing Wild Idea Ground Buffalo, Olive Oil, Red Curry Paste, Water, Onion, Mini Red Peppers, Fish Sauce, Coconut Milk, Cilantro, Lemongrass Paste, Peanuts, Basil, and Jasmine Rice. One special Curry! You can find this recipe and purchase the Wild Idea Ground Buffalo along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wide Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

BISON CURRY
The flavors in curry can take you to faraway places right in your own kitchen. This super easy recipe will have you on a culinary journey in a snap! Approved by Dan & Jill. 😉

Ingredients:

1 – pound Ground Buffalo Meat
2 – tablespoons olive oil
3 – tablespoons red curry paste
3 – tablespoons water
1 – onion, chopped
5 – mini red peppers, sliced
2 – tablespoons fish sauce
1 – can coconut milk
½ – cup cilantro, chopped
2 – slices fresh ginger (or a pinch of ginger)
2 – teaspoons lemongrass paste
Chopped peanuts
Cilantro and/or fresh basil, chopped
Jasmine or Basmati rice

Preparation:

1 – In a heavy skillet or wok, over medium high heat add oil and crumble in the ground buffalo meat. Push around the pan occasionally to brown.
2 – Halfway through browning the meat, mix the curry paste with the water and drizzle over the meat.
3 – Add the chopped onion and stir to incorporate and continue to cook until the meat is nicely browned and onions are al dente.
4 – Add the sliced red peppers and stir to incorporate.
5 – Deglaze with the fish sauce, then add the coconut milk, lemongrass paste and ginger.
6 – Reduce the heat to medium low and simmer until desired consistency is achieved. If curry gets too thick, add a little water.
7 – To serve, place a scoop of rice in the center of a bowl and add the curry. Garnish with chopped peanuts, cilantro and/or basil leaves.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/bison-curry

One of America’s Favorites – Peanut Butter

February 3, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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“Smooth” peanut butter in a jar

Peanut butter is a food paste or spread made from ground, dry-roasted peanuts. It often contains additional ingredients that modify the taste or texture, such as salt, sweeteners, or emulsifiers. Peanut butter is popular in many countries. The United States is a leading exporter of peanut butter and itself consumes $800 million of peanut butter annually.

Peanut butter is served as a spread on bread, toast, or crackers, and used to make sandwiches (notably the peanut butter and jelly sandwich). It is also used in a number of breakfast dishes and desserts, such as peanut-flavored granola, smoothies, crepes, cookies, brownies, or croissants. It is similar to other nut butters such as cashew butter and almond butter.

The two main types of peanut butter are crunchy (or chunky) and smooth (or creamy). In crunchy peanut butter, some coarsely-ground peanut fragments are included to give extra texture. The peanuts in smooth peanut butter are ground uniformly, creating a creamy texture.

In the US, food regulations require that any product labelled “peanut butter” must contain at least 90% peanuts; the remaining <10% usually consists of “…salt, a sweetener, and an emulsifier or hardened vegetable oil which prevents the peanut oil from separating”. In the US, no product labelled as “peanut butter” can contain “artificial sweeteners, chemical preservatives, natural or artificial coloring additives.” Some brands of peanut butter are sold without emulsifiers that bind the peanut oils with the peanut paste, and so require stirring after separation. Most major brands of peanut butter add white sugar, but there are others that use dried cane syrup, agave syrup, or coconut palm sugar.

Organic and artisanal peanut butters are available, but their markets are small.

A tractor being used to complete the first stage of the peanut harvesting process

Production process
Planting and harvesting
Due to weather conditions, peanuts are usually planted in spring. The peanut comes from a yellow flower which bends over and infiltrates the soil after blooming and wilting, and the peanut starts to grow in the soil. Peanuts are harvested from late August to October, while the weather is clear. This weather allows for dry soil so that when picked, the soil does not stick to the stems and pods. The peanuts are then removed from vines and transported to a peanut shelling machine for mechanical drying. After cropping, the peanuts are delivered to warehouses for cleaning, where they are stored unshelled in silos.

Shelling
Shelling must be conducted carefully lest the seeds be damaged during the removal of the shell. The moisture of the unshelled peanuts is controlled to avoid excessive frangibility of the shells and kernels, which in turn, reduces the amount of dust present in the plant. After, the peanuts are sent to a series of rollers set specifically for the batch of peanuts, where they are cracked. After cracking, the peanuts go through a screening process where they are inspected for contaminants.

Roasting
The dry roasting process employs either the batch or continuous method. In the batch method, peanuts are heated in large quantities in a revolving oven at about 800 °F (427 °C). Next, the peanuts in each batch are uniformly held and roasted in the oven at 320 °F (160 °C) for about 40 to 60 minutes. This method is good to use when the peanuts differ in moisture content. In the continuous method, a hot air roaster is employed. The peanuts pass through the roaster whilst being rocked to permit even roasting. A photometer indicates the completion of dry roasting. This method is favored by large manufacturers since it can lower the rate of spoilage and requires less labor.

Cooling
After dry roasting, peanuts are removed from the oven as quickly as possible and directly placed in a blower-cooler cylinder. There are suction fans in the metal cylinder that can pull a large volume of air through, so the peanuts can be cooled more efficiently. The peanuts will not be dried out because cooling can help retain some oil and moisture. The cooling process is completed when the temperature in the cylinder reaches 86 °F (30 °C).

Blanching
After the kernels have been cooled down, the peanuts will undergo either heat blanching or water blanching to remove the remaining seed coats. Compared to heat blanching, water blanching is a new process. Water blanching first appeared in 1949.

Heat blanching
Peanuts are heated by hot air at 280 °F (138 °C) for not more than 20 minutes in order to soften and split the skins. After that, the peanuts are exposed to continuous steam in a blanching machine. The skins are then removed using either bristles or soft rubber belts. After that, these skins are separated and blown into waste bags. Meanwhile, the hearts of peanuts are segregated through inspection.

Water blanching
After the kernels are arranged in troughs, the skin of the kernel is cracked on opposite sides by rolling it through sharp stationary blades. While the skins are removed, the kernels are brought through a one-minute hot water bath and placed on a swinging pad with canvas on top. The swinging action of the pad rubs off the skins. Afterward, the blanched kernels are dried for at least six hours by hot air at 120 °F (49 °C).

After blanching, the peanuts are screened and inspected to eliminate the burnt and rotten peanuts. A blower is also used to remove light peanuts and discolored peanuts are removed using a color sorting machine.

Grinding
After blanching the peanuts are sent to grinding to be manufactured into peanut butter. The peanuts are then sent through two sizes of grinders. The first grinder produces a medium grind, and the second produces a fine grind. At this point, salt, sugar and a vegetable oil stabilizer are added to the fine grind to produce the peanut butter. This adds flavor and allows the peanut butter to stay as a homogenous mixture. Chopped peanuts may also be added at this stage to produce “chunky” peanut butter.

Packaging

A jar of commercial “creamy” peanut butter

Before packaging, the peanut butter must first be cooled in order to be sealed in jars. The mixture is pumped into a heat exchanger in order to cool it to about 120 °F (49 °C). Once cool, the peanut butter is pumped into jars and vacuum sealed. This vacuum sealing rids the container of oxygen so that oxidation cannot occur, preserving the food. The jars are then labelled and set aside until crystallization occurs. The peanut butter is then packaged into cartons distributed to retailers, where they are stored at room temperature and sold to consumers.

A 2012 article stated that “China and India are the first and second largest producers, respectively”, of peanuts. The United States of America “…is the third largest producer of peanuts (Georgia and Texas are the two major peanut-producing states)” and “more than half of the American peanut crop goes into making peanut butter.”

Nutritional profile
In a 100 gram amount, smooth peanut butter supplies 588 Calories and is composed of 50% fat, 25% protein, 20% carbohydrates (including 6% dietary fiber), and 2% water (table).

Peanut butter is a rich source (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of dietary fiber, vitamin E, pantothenic acid, niacin, and vitamin B6 (table, USDA National Nutrient Database). Also high in content are the dietary minerals manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, and copper (table). Peanut butter is a moderate source (10–19% DV) of thiamin, iron, and potassium (table).

Both crunchy/chunky and smooth peanut butter are sources of saturated (primarily palmitic acid, 21% of total fat) and monounsaturated fats, mainly oleic acid as 47% of total fat, and polyunsaturated fat (28% of total fat), primarily as linoleic acid).

Peanut allergy
For people with a peanut allergy, peanut butter can cause a variety of possible allergic reactions, including life-threatening anaphylaxis. This potential effect has led to banning peanut butter, among other common foods, in some schools.

Symptoms
* Shortness of breath
* Wheezing
* Tightening of the throat
* Itching
* Skin reactions such as hives and swelling
* Digestive problems

Peanut butter cookies, a popular type of cookie made from peanut butter and other ingredients

As an ingredient
Peanut butter is included as an ingredient in many recipes: peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, peanut butter cookies, and candies where peanut is the main flavor, such as Reese’s Pieces, or various peanut butter and chocolate treats, such as Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and the Crispy Crunch candy bar.

Peanut butter’s flavor combines well with other flavors, such as oatmeal, cheese, cured meats, savory sauces, and various types of breads and crackers. The creamy or crunchy, fatty, salty taste pairs very well with complementary soft and sweet ingredients like fruit preserves, bananas, apples, and honey. The taste can also be enhanced by similarly salty things like bacon (see peanut butter, banana and bacon sandwich), especially if the peanut butter has added sweetness.

One snack for children is called “Ants on a Log”, with a celery stick acting as the “log”. The groove in the celery stick is filled with peanut butter and raisins arranged in a row along the top are “ants”.

Plumpy’nut is a peanut butter-based food used to fight malnutrition in famine-stricken countries. A single pack contains 500 calories, can be stored unrefrigerated for 2 years, and requires no cooking or preparation.

As animal food
Peanut butter inside a hollow chew toy is a method to occupy a dog with a favored treat. A common outdoor bird feeder is a coating of peanut butter on a pine cone with an overlying layer of birdseed.

Healthy Chicken Stir Fry Recipes

October 6, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Chicken Stir Fry Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Chicken Stir Fry Recipes with recipes including; Kung Pao Chicken with Bell Peppers, Chicken-Peanut Stir-Fry, and Sweet and Sour Chicken with Brown Rice. These are just 3 of recipes you’ll find at the EatingWell website! Be sure to check it out daily for all the Delicious and Healthy Recipes. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/


Healthy Chicken Stir Fry Recipes
Find healthy, delicious chicken stir fry recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Kung Pao Chicken with Bell Peppers
Here’s an easy chicken recipe you’ll definitely want to add to your dinner repertoire. A quick marinade tenderizes the chicken and infuses flavor in this healthy version of a take-out favorite. Adding a little oil to finish the marinade coats the chicken and helps keep it from sticking to the pan………………..

Chicken-Peanut Stir-Fry
There’s no need to order take-out when you can make this delicious meal at home. Using a ready-made broccoli slaw mix means there’s less vegetable prep time, so this chicken stir-fry with citrus-peanut sauce will be on your table that much faster………………

Sweet and Sour Chicken with Brown Rice
In about the time it takes to order and pick up Chinese takeout, you can make this much healthier version of sweet & sour chicken. Our version loses all the saturated fat that comes from deep-frying, along with the extra sugar and salt. If you prefer, use tofu instead of chicken, and use your favorite vegetables; just be sure to cut them into similar-size pieces so they all cook at about the same rate……………………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Chicken Stir Fry Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19372/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/stir-fry/

Fresh Citrus and Mint Smoked Turkey

November 30, 2018 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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From the Jennie – O Turkey website its a recipe for Fresh Citrus and Mint Smoked Turkey. This is one kicked up Turkey Recipe! Using JENNIE-O® All Natural* Turkey Breast. Topped with a combination of Oranges, Peanuts, Herbs, and Spices! Just looking at the Photo of this makes your mouth water! You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes. So Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

Fresh Citrus and Mint Smoked Turkey
These herbs might sound fit for a cocktail, but they can add a bright, refreshing flavor to your turkey as well. Go from mixologist to chef and spritz up your next meal! This turkey tonic will be gobbled right up.

INGREDIENTS
⅓ cup paprika
¼ cup sugar
2 tablespoons cayenne
2 tablespoons salt, if desired
4 teaspoons black pepper
3 pounds JENNIE-O® All Natural* Turkey Breast
1½ cups packed fresh mint leaves
¼ cup olive oil
2 cloves garlic
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon lemon zest
3 oranges, segmented
peanuts, chopped and toasted, if desired

DIRECTIONS
1) In large bowl, mix rub ingredients: paprika, sugar, cayenne, salt and pepper. Coat turkey breast evenly with rub. Cover with plastic wrap and let marinate in the refrigerator, 8 hours to overnight. Preheat smoker to 300°F. Smoke until well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Slice turkey breast
2) To make mint pesto: Combine mint, olive oil, garlic, balsamic vinegar and lemon juice and zest in food processor and pulse until smooth.
3) Peel orange and cut into segments. Heat large skillet on medium-high heat. When pan is hot, add a single layer of nuts. Do not add any oil or cooking spray – the nuts have enough oils on their own to cook. Stir frequently until nuts turn golden brown. Remove from pan. To assemble, top turkey with orange segments, a drizzle of mint pesto, and toasted peanuts.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 360
Protein 32g
Carbohydrates 18g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 12g
Fat 17g
Cholesterol 100mg
Sodium 650mg
Saturated Fat 4g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1140-fresh-citrus-and-mint-smoked-turkey

One of America’s Favorites – Caramel Apple

October 15, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Caramel apple with peanuts

Caramel apples or taffy apples are created by dipping or rolling apples-on-a-stick in hot caramel, sometimes then rolling them in nuts or other small savories or confections, and allowing them to cool. Generally, they are called caramel apples when only caramel is applied and taffy apples for when there are further ingredients such as peanuts applied.

For high-volume production of caramel apples, a sheet of caramel can be wrapped around the apple, followed by heating the apple to melt the caramel evenly onto it. This creates a harder caramel that is easier to transport but more difficult to eat. Caramel apple production at home usually involves melting pre-purchased caramel candies for dipping or making a homemade caramel from ingredients like corn syrup, brown sugar, butter, and vanilla. Homemade caramel generally results in a softer, creamier coating.

Bags of caramels are commonly sold during the Autumn months in America for making caramel apples.

In recent years, it has become increasingly popular to decorate caramel apples for holidays like Halloween. Methods used to do this include applying sugar or salt to softened caramel, dipping cooled, hardened apples in white or milk chocolate, or painting designs onto finished caramel apples with white chocolate colored with food coloring.

Classically, the preferred apples for use in caramel apples are tart, crisp apples such as Granny Smith or Fuji apples. Softer, grainy-textured apples can also be used, but are not preferred.

In addition to caramel apples, manufacturers and consumers have started to coat apples in chocolate syrup, peanut butter, etc. and adding toppings such as crushed peanuts, pretzels, mini M&Ms, Reese’s Pieces, coconut flakes, and mini chocolate chips. Candy apple shops and candy apple bars have started to pop up in bigger cities, at weddings and parties to allow people to enjoy the apple with the dipping sauces and toppings they prefer.

* I always think of these around the Halloween Season. When I was growing up my Grandparents owned a small neighborhood store. Every Halloween Season my Grandmother would just make endless amounts of Caramel Apple with crushed Peanuts on them. So Good!!

 

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