One of America’s Favorite (…and mine) – Peanut Butter

February 18, 2013 at 9:46 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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"Smooth" peanut butter in a jar

“Smooth” peanut butter in a jar

Peanut butter is a food paste made primarily from ground dry roasted peanuts, popular in North America, Netherlands, United Kingdom, and parts of Asia, particularly the Philippines and Indonesia. It is mainly used as a sandwich spread, sometimes in combination with other spreads such as in the peanut butter and jelly sandwich. The United States and China are leading exporters of peanut butter. Other nuts are used as the basis for similar nut butters.
Peanuts are native to the tropics of the Americas and were mashed to become a pasty substance by the Aztec Native Americans hundreds of years ago. A number of peanut paste products have been used over the centuries, and the distinction between peanut paste and peanut butter is not always clear in ordinary use. Early forms of peanut butter, like the Aztecs’ version, were nothing but a paste made from roasted peanuts. Modern processing machines allow for very smooth products to be made, which often include vegetable oils to aid in its spreadability.
Evidence of peanut butter as it is known today comes from U.S. Patent 306,727, issued in 1884 to Marcellus Gilmore Edson of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, for the finished product of the process of milling roasted peanuts between heated surfaces until the peanuts entered “a fluid or semi-fluid state.” As the peanut product cooled, it set into what Edson explained as being “a consistency like that of butter, lard, or ointment”. Edson’s patent is based on the preparation of a peanut paste as an intermediate to the production the modern product we know as peanut butter; it does show the initial steps necessary for the production of peanut butter. George Washington Carver is often falsely credited with inventing peanut butter and is nearly synonymous with its history in the United States.
Dr. John Harvey Kellogg patented a “Process of Preparing Nut Meal” in 1895 and used peanuts. Kellogg served the patients at his Battle Creek Sanitarium peanut butter.
Dr. Ambrose Straub, a physician in St. Louis, Missouri, pursued a method for providing toothless elderly with protein in the 1890s. His peanut-butter-making machine was patented in 1903.
January 24 is National Peanut Butter Day in the United States.
Peanut butter has a high level of monounsaturated fats and resveratrol. Peanut butter (and peanuts) provides protein, vitamins B3 and E, magnesium, folate, dietary fiber, arginine, and high levels of the antioxidant p-coumaric acid.
For people with a peanut allergy, peanut butter can cause reactions, including anaphylactic shock, which has led to its being banned in some schools.
Peanut butter is a source of incomplete protein. A common combination to provide a complete protein is pairing peanut butter with whole wheat bread, however, the two foods need only be consumed within 24 hours of each other to complete the protein.
The peanut plant is susceptible to the mold Aspergillus flavus which produces a carcinogenic substance called aflatoxin. Since it is impossible to completely remove every instance of aflatoxins, contamination of peanuts and peanut butter is monitored in many countries to ensure safe levels of this carcinogen. In 1990, a study showed that average American peanut butter contained an average of 5.7 parts per billion of aflatoxins, per the U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines of 20 parts per billion.

Some brands of peanut butter may contain a small amount of added partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, which are high in trans fatty acids that are thought to be a cause of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, and stroke; these oils are added to prevent the peanut oil from separating from the ground peanuts. Peanuts and natural peanut butter, i.e., ground, dry roasted peanuts without added oils, do not contain partially hydrogenated oils or trans fats. A U.S. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) survey of commercial peanut butters in the U.S. showed that trans fats were undetectable, i.e., below the detection limit of 0.01% of the sample weight. Some commercial peanut butters being advertised as “natural” have supplanted added partially or fully hydrogenated vegetable oils with palm oil, which provides the same benefit of emulsion. However, a 2006 study supported by the National Institutes of Health and the USDA Agricultural Research Service concluded that palm oil is not a safe substitute for partially hydrogenated fats (trans fats) in the food industry, because palm oil results in adverse changes in the blood concentrations of LDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B just as trans fat does. A 2011 analysis of 23 countries showed that for each kilogram of palm oil added to the diet annually, there was an increase in ischemic heart disease deaths. The increase was much smaller in high-income countries.

A 1974 study found that peanut oil caused relatively heavy clogging of arteries in Rhesus monkeys. Robert Wissler of the University of Chicago reported that diets high in peanut oil combined with cholesterol intake clogged the arteries of Rhesus monkeys more than butterfat. However, subsequent work has cast serious doubt on those findings. Wissler’s monkeys were being fed 20 times higher than normal dietary quantities of cholesterol in addition to peanut oil. When a similar 1988 study was performed without abnormal doses of cholesterol, no artery-clogging effect was seen. In fact, peanut oil has been found to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol without reducing HDL (good) cholesterol.
Peanut butter can harbor Salmonella and cause salmonellosis, as in the Salmonella outbreak in the United States in 2007. In 2009, due to mishandling and apparent criminal negligence at a single Peanut Corporation of America factory in Blakely, Georgia, Salmonella was found in 46 states in peanut-butter-based products such as crackers, peanut-butter cookies, and dog treats. It had claimed at least nine human lives as of 17 March 2009 and made at least 691 people sick in the United States.

 
Peanut butter is included as an ingredient in many recipes, especially cookies and candies. Its flavor combines well with other flavors,

Peanut butter cookies

Peanut butter cookies

such as chocolate, oatmeal, cheese, cured meats, savory sauces, and various types of breads and crackers.
In addition to jelly, in a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, peanut butter is said by some to combine well with pickles, mayonnaise, olives, onion, horseradish, bacon, Marmite, or Vegemite in a sandwich. Elvis is said to have liked sandwiches made with peanut butter, banana and bacon while Hemingway is said to have liked thick onion slices in a peanut butter sandwich.
A flavorful, appealing snack for children is called “Ants on a Log”; a celery stick is the “log”, and raisins arranged in a row along a base of peanut butter are the “ants”.

Plumpy’nut is a peanut butter-based food used to fight malnutrition in famine stricken countries. A single pack contains 500 calories, can be stored unrefrigerated for 2 years, and requires no cooking or preparation.
By placing a medium amount of peanut butter inside the opening of a hollow sturdy chew toy, it is easy to create a toy that will keep a dog occupied for as long as an hour. Most dogs enjoy the challenge of reaching the peanut butter with their tongue and extracting it.
A common, simple outdoor bird feeder can be made by coating a pine cone once with peanut butter, then again with birdseed.
The oils found in peanut butter are known to allow chewing gum to be removed from hair.
A slang term for peanut butter in World War II was “monkey butter“.
In Dutch peanut butter is called pindakaas (peanut cheese), because the name butter was protected in the Netherlands when peanut butter came on the market in 1948. The word kaas, cheese, was already being used in another product (leverkaas, Leberkäse) that has no cheese in it.
In the 1960s, collectible glasses related to characters from the Oz Books were sold as promotions with “Oz, the Wonderful Peanut Spread.”[citation needed] The product was forced to rename itself a peanut butter when the USDA informed the company that, under food laws, a “peanut spread” has a lower peanut percentage than a “peanut butter.”

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It was a PBJ Lunch Today

March 24, 2012 at 12:02 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads | 4 Comments
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I love Peanut Butter! My favorite is Jif Smooth Reduced Fat Peanut Butter. I love eating it by the spoonful, spreading it on Apples or Celery, or my favorite a PBJ Sandwich. In this case the “J” stands for Jam. I used Jif Smooth Reduced Fat Peanut Butter and then topped it with Smucker’s Sugar free Blackberry Jam. If you’ve never tried any of the Smucker’s Sugarless Jams and Jellies your missing out! I put everything on a couple of Toasted Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread slices. I had a couple of slices of a Gala Apple on the side.

Love that Peanut Butter!

March 8, 2012 at 11:38 AM | Posted in Food, snacks | Leave a comment
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My one snack/food weak point is Peanut Butter! As I was enjoying my daily tablespoon of Jif Reduced Peanut Butter I was wondering about the origin of Peanut Butter. So here’s a little background on one of my favorites Peanut Butter.

Peanut Butter

Peanut butter is a food paste made primarily from ground dry roasted peanuts, popular in North America, Netherlands, United Kingdom, and parts of Asia, particularly the Philippines and Indonesia. It is mainly used as a sandwich spread, sometimes in combination as in the peanut butter and jelly sandwich. The United States and China are leading exporters of peanut butter. Other nuts are used as the basis for similar nut butters.

Peanuts are native to the tropics of the Americas and were mashed to become a pasty substance by the Aztec Native Americans hundreds of years ago. A number of peanut paste products have been used over the centuries, and the distinction between peanut paste and peanut butter is not always clear in ordinary use. Early forms of peanut butter, like the Aztecs’ version, were nothing but pure roasted peanut paste. It may have been harder to work with and spread than regular peanut butter, less creamy and less sweet. Vegetable oil was also later added to most brands to aid in its spreadability, but with new modern processing machines being invented, the peanut butter was already significantly smoother than it had been.

Peanut butter was invented and reinvented many times during history. Peanuts were known as early as 950 B.C. and originated in South America. The ancient Incas used peanuts and were known to have made it into a paste-like substance. As a crop peanuts emigrated from South America to Africa by early explorers and then traveled by trade into Spain who then traded the product to the American colonies. The first commercial peanut crop was grown in Virginia in the early to mid 1840’s and in North Carolina beginning around 1818.

Evidence of peanut butter as it is known today comes from U.S. Patent 306,727, issued in 1884 to Marcellus Gilmore Edson of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, for the finished product of the process of milling roasted peanuts between heated surfaces until the peanuts entered “a fluid or semi-fluid state.” As the peanut product cooled, it set into what Carter explained as being “a consistency like that of butter, lard, or ointment.” Edson’s patent is based on the preparation of a peanut paste as an intermediate to the production the modern product we know as peanut butter, it does show the initial steps necessary for the production of peanut butter. George Washington Carver is often credited with inventing peanut butter and is nearly synonymous with its history in the United States.

Dr. Ambrose Straub, a physician in St. Louis, Missouri, pursued a method for providing toothless elderly with protein in the 1890s. His peanut-butter-making machine was patented in 1903.

January 24 is National Peanut Butter Day in the United States.

Peanut butter has a high level of monounsaturated fats and resveratrol. Peanut butter (and peanuts) provide protein, vitamins B3 and E, magnesium, folate, dietary fiber, arginine, and high levels of the antioxidant p-coumaric acid.

A slang term for peanut butter in World War II was “monkey butter“.

In Dutch peanut butter is called pindakaas (peanut cheese), because the name butter was protected in the Netherlands when peanut butter came on the market in 1948. The word kaas, cheese, was already being used in another product (leverkaas) that has no cheese in it. In the 1960s, collectible glasses related to characters from the Oz Books were sold as promotions with “Oz, the Wonderful Peanut Spread.” The product was forced to rename itself a peanut butter when the USDA informed the company that, under food laws, a “peanut spread” has a lower peanut percentage than a “peanut butter.”

My Weakness Jif Peanut Butter!

March 8, 2012 at 11:34 AM | Posted in snacks | 1 Comment
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A little history on my favorite snack maker!

In 1958, original Jif® Creamy Peanut Butter was introduced, and quickly became a favorite. Moms recognized Jif peanut butter‘s superior fresh-roasted peanut taste and made Jif peanut butter a delicious addition to recipes for every meal.

Jif has introduced several new varieties over the years. In 1974, Jif Extra Crunchy peanut butter made its debut and proved to be a success with adults and children alike. In 1991, we introduced Simply Jif peanut butter, our product with low-sodium and less sugar than regular peanut butter. Shortly after, we responded to the demand for a reduced fat product with delicious fresh-roasted peanut taste with the launch of Jif Reduced Fat peanut butter spread. In 2004, the sweet combination of peanut butter and honey made its way into the Jif portfolio as Jif with Honey was debuted. Jif Natural peanut butter spread was launched in 2009. It is made from five simple ingredients and is now offered in both creamy and crunchy varieties. Soon after, Jif Omega-3 peanut butter was launched with the same great taste as regular Jif peanut butter. Jif Omega-3 peanut butter is an excellent source of Omega-3 DHA & EPA combined per serving. Most recently, Jif has made it easy to take the peanuttiest peanut butter with you anywhere with Jif To Go™, the perfect portable snack.

http://www.jif.com/

Nut of the Week – Peanuts

February 13, 2012 at 2:09 PM | Posted in baking, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, nuts | Leave a comment
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The peanut, or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), is a species in the legume or “bean” family (Fabaceae). The peanut was probably first

Peanut leaves and freshly dug pods

cultivated in the valleys of Peru. It is an annual herbaceous plant growing 1.0 to 1.6 ft tall. The leaves are opposite, pinnate with four leaflets (two opposite pairs; no terminal leaflet), each leaflet 1⅜ to 2¾ in long and ⅜ to 1 inch broad. The flowers are a typical peaflower in shape, 0.8 to 1.6 in ¾ to 1½ in across, yellow with reddish veining. Hypogaea means “under the earth”, after pollination, the flower stalk elongates causing it to bend until the ovary touches the ground. Continued stalk growth then pushes the ovary underground where the mature fruit develops into a legume pod, the peanut – a classical example of geocarpy. Pods are 1.2 to 2.8 in long, containing 1 to 4 seeds.

Peanuts are known by many other local names such as earthnuts, ground nuts, goober peas, monkey nuts, pygmy nuts and pig nuts. Despite its name and appearance, the peanut is not a nut, but rather a legume.

The domesticated peanut is an amphidiploid or allotetraploid, meaning that it has two sets of chromosomes from two different species, thought to be A. duranensis and A. ipaensis. These likely combined in the wild to form the tetraploid species A. monticola, which gave rise to the domesticated peanut. This domestication might have taken place in Paraguay or Bolivia, where the wildest strains grow today. Many pre-Columbian cultures, such as the Moche, depicted peanuts in their art.

Archeologists have dated the oldest specimens to about 7,600 years, found in Peru. Cultivation spread as far as Mesoamerica where the Spanish conquistadors found the tlalcacahuatl (Nahuatl = ‘peanut,’ whence Mexican Spanish, cacahuate and French, cacahuète) being offered for sale in the marketplace of Tenochtitlan (Mexico City). The plant was later spread worldwide by European traders.

The orange-veined, yellow-petaled, pea-like flower of the Arachis hypogaea is borne in axillary clusters above ground. Following self-pollination, the flowers fade and wither. The stalk at the base of the ovary, called the pedicel, elongates rapidly, and turns downward to bury the fruits several inches in the ground, where they complete their development. The entire plant, including most of the roots, is removed from the soil during harvesting. The fruits have wrinkled shells that are constricted between pairs of the one to four (usually two) seeds per pod.

Peanuts grow best in light, sandy loam soil. They require five months of warm weather, and an annual rainfall of 20 to 39 in or the equivalent in irrigation water.

The pods ripen 120 to 150 days after the seeds are planted. If the crop is harvested too early, the pods will be unripe. If they are harvested late, the pods will snap off at the stalk, and will remain in the soil. They need an acidic soil to grow preferably with 5.9-7 pH

Thousands of peanut cultivars are grown, with four major cultivar groups being the most popular: Spanish, Runner, Virginia, and Valencia. There are also Tennessee red and white groups. Certain cultivar groups are preferred for particular uses because of differences in flavor, oil content, size, shape, and disease resistance. For many uses the different cultivars are interchangeable. Most peanuts marketed in the shell are of the Virginia type, along with some Valencias selected for large size and the attractive appearance of the shell. Spanish peanuts are used mostly for peanut candy, salted nuts, and peanut butter. Most Runners are used to make peanut butter.

The various types are distinguished by branching habit and branch length. There are numerous varieties of each type of peanut. There are two main growth forms, bunch and runner. Bunch types grow upright, while runner types grow near the ground.

Each year new cultivars of peanuts are bred and introduced. Introducing a new cultivar may mean change in the planting rate, adjusting the planter, harvester, dryer, cleaner, sheller, and method of marketing.

While peanuts are nutritional as an everyday food, during expeditions on foot into the wilderness, especially regions of sub-zero temperatures like the South and North Poles, having peanuts has been the deciding factor between life and death. After learning from the mistakes of other adventurers, especially the tragically ill-prepared Discovery and Terra Nova expeditions to the South Pole led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Captain Oates from 1901 to 1912 (during which the majority of the expedition died), where starvation and lack of the proper amount of calories needed to keep from freezing were a constant danger, adventurers had to decide on a type of food that was dense, portable, high in protein and calories and could be eaten at any time without preparation. Subsequent

Roasted peanuts as snack food

expeditions thus settled on peanut butter as the ideal foodstuff, freeing explorers from the transport and kindling of cooking fuel (a near-impossibility in the frigid polar winds), and high enough in protein and calories to fuel the party and keep them from freezing to death in the harsh weather and freezing nighttime temperatures. Peanut butter was further favored for speed and ease of use because it could be eaten while walking if necessary.

Peanut oil is often used in cooking, because it has a mild flavor and a relatively high smoke point. Due to its high monounsaturated content, it is considered more healthy than saturated oils, and is resistant to rancidity. There are several types of peanut oil including: aromatic roasted peanut oil, refined peanut oil, extra virgin or cold pressed peanut oil and peanut extract. In the United States, refined peanut oil is exempt from allergen labeling laws.

Peanut flour is lower in fat than peanut butter, and is popular with chefs because its high protein content makes it suitable as a flavor enhancer. Peanut flour is used as a gluten-free solution.

Boiled peanuts are a popular snack in the southern United States, as well as in India, China and Ghana.

In the U.S., peanuts are used in candies, cakes, cookies, and other sweets. They are also enjoyed roasted and salted. Peanut butter is one of the most popular peanut-based foods in the U.S., and for four hundred years, recipes for peanut soup have been present in the South, Virginia in particular. In some southern portions of the U.S., peanuts are boiled for several hours until soft and moist. Peanuts are also deep fried, shell and all.

Peanuts are rich in nutrients, providing over 30 essential nutrients and phytonutrients. Peanuts are a good source of niacin, folate, fiber, magnesium, vitamin E, manganese and phosphorus. They also are naturally free of trans-fats and sodium, and contain about 25% protein (a higher proportion than in any true nut).

Recent research on peanuts and nuts in general has found antioxidants and other chemicals that may provide health benefits. New research shows peanuts rival the antioxidant content of many fruits. Roasted peanuts rival the antioxidant content of blackberries and strawberries, and are far richer in antioxidants than carrots or beets. Research conducted by a team of University of Florida scientists, published in the journal Food Chemistry, shows that peanuts contain high concentrations of antioxidant polyphenols, primarily a compound called p-coumaric acid, and that roasting can increase peanuts’ p-coumaric acid levels, boosting their overall antioxidant content by as much as 22%.

Sugar-Free Peanut Butter Cookies

February 13, 2012 at 2:05 PM | Posted in baking, diabetes, diabetes friendly, nuts | 2 Comments
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Sugar-Free Peanut Butter Cookies

Ingredients

2 cups smooth natural peanut butter
2 cups granular no-calorie sucralose sweetener (e.g., Splenda ®)
2 large eggs

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly grease a baking sheet.
Thoroughly mix together the peanut butter, sucralose, and eggs in a bowl. Drop mixture by spoonfuls onto the prepared baking sheet.
Bake in the preheated oven until center appears dry, about 8 minutes.

Nutritional Information
Sugar-Free Peanut Butter Cookies

Servings Per Recipe: 24

Amount Per Serving

Calories: 145

Total Fat: 11.7g
Cholesterol: 18mg
Sodium: 62mg
Total Carbs: 6.7g
Dietary Fiber: 1.5g
Protein: 6g

Enon Apple Butter Festival – Enon, Ohio

October 4, 2011 at 10:55 AM | Posted in baking, dessert, Festivals, Food, grilling | Leave a comment
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Enon Apple Butter Festival

October 8 & 9, 2011

Saturday 10am – 6pm

Sunday 11am-5pm

2011 marks the festival’s 34th year and the 13th year for our new downtown site. RAIN, SHINE or SNOW!!

The Enon Community Historical Society sponsors the annual Enon Apple Butter Festival as a community service project.

What will you see, smell and hear at the Festival?

Food, Food and More Food – Pork Chops, Hot Dogs, Chicken Noodles, Apple Dumplings, Walking Tacos, Funnel cakes, Sausages, Hamburgers, Peanuts in the shell and by the bag, Shaved Ice and of course APPLE BUTTER. Food vendors are required to setup in booths and cook the products on site. Food trailers are not allowed on the grounds.

Crafts and Gifts – All Craft booths are judged by the committee and are of homemade quality. Manufactured crafts are not allowed in the festival.

Demonstrations – The Enon Community Historical Society volunteers demonstrate the Apple Butter production by cooking all apple butter sold over a fire in copper kettles. Cider by the cup, 25 cents, is available at the Historical Society’s booth.

Music and Entertainment – Music from the past adds to the festival atmosphere throughout the entire festival. Greenon High School band and choir entertain the public on Saturday at the Opening Ceremony.


http://www.enonhistory.com/AppleButterFestival.html

Top 25 Diabetic Snacks

July 15, 2011 at 10:19 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, snacks | Leave a comment
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Another interesting article from  http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com This one on everyone’s favorite Snacks! I’ll be showing one of the top rated ones each day.So if your going to snack make it one of these. Hope you find it interesting.

Top 25 Diabetic Snacks

by Marsha McCulloch, R.D., L.D., and Laura Marzen, R.D., L.D.
Stomach grumbling or blood glucose a bit low? Reach for one of our top 25 consumer-tasted and dietitian-approved snacks. Diabetic Living’s dietitians scoured the supermarkets to find the most nutritious packaged snacks, and a panel of taste-testers (including people with diabetes) ranked the treats. From chips and dip to cookies and popcorn, see which snacks were awarded the Diabetic Living What to Eat Seal of Approval.

How These Snacks Made the List

Selecting smart between-meal munchies is simple if you’re satisfied with a basic banana or apple. But sometimes our taste buds scream for something a little more fun and flavorful.

How we chose the best snacks:
1. Diabetic Living’s dietitians scoured the supermarkets to find the most nutritious packaged snacks in 25 different categories.
2. In a rigorous taste test, an average of 50 people, including people with diabetes, sampled each snack (with the brand concealed), picking the best among three choices in each category.
3. Based on their ratings, we’ve awarded the top 25 snacks the Diabetic Living What to Eat Seal of Approval.

Read on to see all the winners and honorable mentions. At the end, get a FREE two-page guide featuring the winners that you can print at home!

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/food-to-eat/nutrition/top-diabetic-snacks/?page=1

Best Nut Butter

Winner: Simply Jif Creamy Peanut Butter (jif.com)

Why it won: Peanut butter is the quintessential snack, and this variety has less sodium and sugar than regular peanut butter and a really smooth, peanutty flavor. Plus, it’s a good source of vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant.

Taste-tester’s quote: “I like the creamy feel and good peanut flavor.”

Nutrition facts per 2 tablespoons:

* 190 cal.
* 6 g carb.
* 16 g total fat (3 g sat. fat)
* 8 g pro.
* 65 mg sodium
* 2 g fiber

Honorable mention:

* Smucker’s Natural Peanut Butter
* Arrowhead Mills Almond Butter

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