“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – BROCCOLI WITH ASIAN TOFU

December 9, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is – BROCCOLI WITH ASIAN TOFU. Made using Tofu, Lite Soy Sauce, Sesame Oil, Brown Sugar, Ginger Root, Broccoli, Peanut Oil, Crushed Red Pepper, Garlic, and Sesame Seeds. Tofu done right! You can find this recipe along with all the other Diabetic Friendly Recipes at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. Check out soon to find Delicious and Healthy Diabetic Friendly Recipes. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

BROCCOLI WITH ASIAN TOFU
Ingredients

1 pkg (16 oz) firm tofu, drained
2 Tbsp lite soy sauce
1 tsp sesame oil (optional)
1/2 Tbsp brown sugar
1 Tbsp fresh ginger root, finely chopped or shredded (or 1 tsp ground ginger)
1 lb fresh broccoli, rinsed and cut into individual spears
1 Tbsp peanut oil or vegetable oil
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper
4 Tbsp garlic, peeled and thinly sliced (about 8 cloves)
1 Tbsp sesame seeds (optional)
Cooking spray

Directions

1 – Slice tofu into eight pieces. Place on a plate or flat surface covered with three paper towels. Top with four more paper towels. Top with another flat plate or cutting board. Press down evenly and gently to squeeze out moisture. Throw away paper towels. Replace with fresh paper towels and press again. (The more liquid you remove, the more sauce the tofu will absorb.)
2 – Place tofu in a bowl just big enough to hold all eight pieces lying on their widest side without overlapping.
In a small bowl, stir to thoroughly combine soy sauce, sesame oil, brown sugar, and ginger into a marinade, and stir thoroughly. Pour over tofu. Carefully turn the tofu several times to coat well. 3 3 – Set aside.
4 РMeanwhile, heat a large nonstick saute pan coated with cooking spray. Add broccoli and saut̩ for about 5 minutes, until it turns bright green and becomes tender and crispy. Remove broccoli from pan and set aside.
5 – Heat a grill pan or flat saute pan over high heat. Drain tofu, reserving marinade. Place on grill pan to heat for about 3 minutes. Gently turn. Heat the second side for 3 minutes.
6 – At the same time, in the saute pan over medium-low heat, warm the peanut oil, crushed red pepper, and garlic until the garlic softens and begins to turn brown, about 30 seconds to 1 minute. 7 – Add broccoli and reserved marinade, and gently mix until well-coated.
8 – Place two slices of tofu on each plate with one-quarter of the broccoli and marinade mixture. Sprinkle with sesame seeds (optional).
NOTES:
Optional: Delicious served on top of brown rice or Asian-style noodles (soba or udon).

Recipe Yield: Yield: 4 servings “Serving size: 2 slices tofu, with broccoli and marinade mixture
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/broccoli-with-asian-tofu

Nut of the Week – Peanuts

February 13, 2012 at 2:09 PM | Posted in baking, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, nuts | Leave a comment
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The peanut, or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), is a species in the legume or “bean” family (Fabaceae). The peanut was probably first

Peanut leaves and freshly dug pods

cultivated in the valleys of Peru. It is an annual herbaceous plant growing 1.0 to 1.6 ft tall. The leaves are opposite, pinnate with four leaflets (two opposite pairs; no terminal leaflet), each leaflet 1⅜ to 2¾ in long and ⅜ to 1 inch broad. The flowers are a typical peaflower in shape, 0.8 to 1.6 in ¾ to 1½ in across, yellow with reddish veining. Hypogaea means “under the earth”, after pollination, the flower stalk elongates causing it to bend until the ovary touches the ground. Continued stalk growth then pushes the ovary underground where the mature fruit develops into a legume pod, the peanut – a classical example of geocarpy. Pods are 1.2 to 2.8 in long, containing 1 to 4 seeds.

Peanuts are known by many other local names such as earthnuts, ground nuts, goober peas, monkey nuts, pygmy nuts and pig nuts. Despite its name and appearance, the peanut is not a nut, but rather a legume.

The domesticated peanut is an amphidiploid or allotetraploid, meaning that it has two sets of chromosomes from two different species, thought to be A. duranensis and A. ipaensis. These likely combined in the wild to form the tetraploid species A. monticola, which gave rise to the domesticated peanut. This domestication might have taken place in Paraguay or Bolivia, where the wildest strains grow today. Many pre-Columbian cultures, such as the Moche, depicted peanuts in their art.

Archeologists have dated the oldest specimens to about 7,600 years, found in Peru. Cultivation spread as far as Mesoamerica where the Spanish conquistadors found the tlalcacahuatl (Nahuatl = ‘peanut,’ whence Mexican Spanish, cacahuate and French, cacahuète) being offered for sale in the marketplace of Tenochtitlan (Mexico City). The plant was later spread worldwide by European traders.

The orange-veined, yellow-petaled, pea-like flower of the Arachis hypogaea is borne in axillary clusters above ground. Following self-pollination, the flowers fade and wither. The stalk at the base of the ovary, called the pedicel, elongates rapidly, and turns downward to bury the fruits several inches in the ground, where they complete their development. The entire plant, including most of the roots, is removed from the soil during harvesting. The fruits have wrinkled shells that are constricted between pairs of the one to four (usually two) seeds per pod.

Peanuts grow best in light, sandy loam soil. They require five months of warm weather, and an annual rainfall of 20 to 39 in or the equivalent in irrigation water.

The pods ripen 120 to 150 days after the seeds are planted. If the crop is harvested too early, the pods will be unripe. If they are harvested late, the pods will snap off at the stalk, and will remain in the soil. They need an acidic soil to grow preferably with 5.9-7 pH

Thousands of peanut cultivars are grown, with four major cultivar groups being the most popular: Spanish, Runner, Virginia, and Valencia. There are also Tennessee red and white groups. Certain cultivar groups are preferred for particular uses because of differences in flavor, oil content, size, shape, and disease resistance. For many uses the different cultivars are interchangeable. Most peanuts marketed in the shell are of the Virginia type, along with some Valencias selected for large size and the attractive appearance of the shell. Spanish peanuts are used mostly for peanut candy, salted nuts, and peanut butter. Most Runners are used to make peanut butter.

The various types are distinguished by branching habit and branch length. There are numerous varieties of each type of peanut. There are two main growth forms, bunch and runner. Bunch types grow upright, while runner types grow near the ground.

Each year new cultivars of peanuts are bred and introduced. Introducing a new cultivar may mean change in the planting rate, adjusting the planter, harvester, dryer, cleaner, sheller, and method of marketing.

While peanuts are nutritional as an everyday food, during expeditions on foot into the wilderness, especially regions of sub-zero temperatures like the South and North Poles, having peanuts has been the deciding factor between life and death. After learning from the mistakes of other adventurers, especially the tragically ill-prepared Discovery and Terra Nova expeditions to the South Pole led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Captain Oates from 1901 to 1912 (during which the majority of the expedition died), where starvation and lack of the proper amount of calories needed to keep from freezing were a constant danger, adventurers had to decide on a type of food that was dense, portable, high in protein and calories and could be eaten at any time without preparation. Subsequent

Roasted peanuts as snack food

expeditions thus settled on peanut butter as the ideal foodstuff, freeing explorers from the transport and kindling of cooking fuel (a near-impossibility in the frigid polar winds), and high enough in protein and calories to fuel the party and keep them from freezing to death in the harsh weather and freezing nighttime temperatures. Peanut butter was further favored for speed and ease of use because it could be eaten while walking if necessary.

Peanut oil is often used in cooking, because it has a mild flavor and a relatively high smoke point. Due to its high monounsaturated content, it is considered more healthy than saturated oils, and is resistant to rancidity. There are several types of peanut oil including: aromatic roasted peanut oil, refined peanut oil, extra virgin or cold pressed peanut oil and peanut extract. In the United States, refined peanut oil is exempt from allergen labeling laws.

Peanut flour is lower in fat than peanut butter, and is popular with chefs because its high protein content makes it suitable as a flavor enhancer. Peanut flour is used as a gluten-free solution.

Boiled peanuts are a popular snack in the southern United States, as well as in India, China and Ghana.

In the U.S., peanuts are used in candies, cakes, cookies, and other sweets. They are also enjoyed roasted and salted. Peanut butter is one of the most popular peanut-based foods in the U.S., and for four hundred years, recipes for peanut soup have been present in the South, Virginia in particular. In some southern portions of the U.S., peanuts are boiled for several hours until soft and moist. Peanuts are also deep fried, shell and all.

Peanuts are rich in nutrients, providing over 30 essential nutrients and phytonutrients. Peanuts are a good source of niacin, folate, fiber, magnesium, vitamin E, manganese and phosphorus. They also are naturally free of trans-fats and sodium, and contain about 25% protein (a higher proportion than in any true nut).

Recent research on peanuts and nuts in general has found antioxidants and other chemicals that may provide health benefits. New research shows peanuts rival the antioxidant content of many fruits. Roasted peanuts rival the antioxidant content of blackberries and strawberries, and are far richer in antioxidants than carrots or beets. Research conducted by a team of University of Florida scientists, published in the journal Food Chemistry, shows that peanuts contain high concentrations of antioxidant polyphenols, primarily a compound called p-coumaric acid, and that roasting can increase peanuts’ p-coumaric acid levels, boosting their overall antioxidant content by as much as 22%.

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