One of America’s Favorites – Danish Pastry

June 19, 2017 at 5:34 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A typical Spandauer-type Danish with apple filling and glazing

A Danish pastry or just Danish (especially in American English) is a multilayered, laminated sweet pastry in the viennoiserie tradition. The concept was brought to Denmark by Austrian bakers and has since developed into a Danish specialty. Like other viennoiserie pastries, such as croissants, they are a variant of puff pastry made of laminated yeast-leavened doughs, creating a layered texture.

Danish pastries were exported with immigrants to the United States, and are today popular around the world.

 

Danish pastry is made of yeast-leavened dough of wheat flour, milk, eggs, sugar and large amounts of butter or margarine.

A yeast dough is rolled out thinly, covered with thin slices of butter between the layers of dough, and then the dough is folded and rolled several times, creating 27 layers. If necessary, the dough is chilled between foldings to ease handling. The process of rolling, buttering, folding and chilling is repeated multiple times to create a multilayered dough that becomes airy and crispy on the outside, but also rich and buttery.

Butter is the traditional fat used in Danish pastry, but in industrial production, less expensive fats are often used, such as hydrogenated sunflower oil (known as “pastry fat” in the UK).

 

In Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, the term for Danish pastry is wienerbrød/wienerbröd, “Viennese bread”. The same etymology is also the origin of the Finnish viineri. Danish pastry is referred to as facturas in some Spanish speaking countries. In Vienna, the Danish pastry, referring to Copenhagen, is called Kopenhagener Plunder or Dänischer Plunder.

 

The origin of the Danish pastry is often ascribed to a strike amongst bakery workers in Denmark in 1850. The strike forced bakery owners to hire workers from abroad, among them several Austrian bakers, who brought along new baking traditions and pastry recipes. The Austrian pastry of Plundergebäck soon became popular in Denmark and after the labour disputes ended, Danish bakers adopted the Austrian recipes, adjusting them to their own liking and traditions by increasing the amount of egg and fat for example. This development resulted in what is now known as the Danish pastry.

One of the baking techniques and traditions that the Austrian bakers brought with them was the Viennese lamination technique. Due to such novelties the Danes called the pastry technique “wienerbrød” and, as mentioned above, that name is still in use in Northern Europe today. At that time, almost all baked goods in Denmark were given exotic names.

 

A cinnamon Danish with chocolate

Danish pastries as consumed in Denmark have different shapes and names. Some are topped with chocolate, pearl sugar, glacé icing and/or slivered nuts and they may be stuffed with a variety of ingredients such as jam or preserves (usually apple or prune), remonce, marzipan and/or custard. Shapes are numerous, including circles with filling in the middle (known in Denmark as “Spandauers”), figure-eights, spirals (known as snails), and the pretzel-like kringles.

 

 

In Sweden, Danish pastry is typically made in the Spandauer-style, often with vanilla custard.

In the UK, various ingredients such as jam, custard, apricots, cherries, raisins, flaked almonds, pecans or caramelized toffee are placed on or within sections of divided dough, which is then baked. Cardamom is often added to increase the aromatic sense of sweetness.

In the US, Danishes are typically given a topping of fruit or sweet baker’s cheese prior to baking. Danishes with nuts on them are also popular there and in Sweden, where chocolate spritzing and powdered sugar are also often added.

In Argentina, they are usually filled with dulce de leche or dulce de membrillo.

 

A slice of an American apple crumb Danish

Danish pastry was brought to the United States by Danish immigrants. Lauritz C. Klitteng of Læsø popularized “Danish pastry” in the US around 1915–1920. According to Klitteng, he made Danish pastry for the wedding of President Woodrow Wilson in December 1915. Klitteng toured the world to promote his product and was featured in such 1920s periodicals as the National Baker, the Bakers’ Helper, and the Bakers’ Weekly. Klitteng briefly had his own Danish Culinary Studio at 146 Fifth Avenue in New York City.

Herman Gertner owned a chain of New York City restaurants and had brought Klitteng to New York to sell Danish pastry. Gertner’s obituary appeared in the January 23, 1962 New York Times:

“At one point during his career Mr. Gertner befriended a Danish baker who convinced him that Danish pastry might be well received in New York. Mr. Gertner began serving the pastry in his restaurant and it immediately was a success.”

 

 

National Doughnut Day 2017 in United States of America – Friday, June 2

June 2, 2017 at 11:35 AM | Posted in baking | Leave a comment
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National Doughnut Day was established in 1938 by the Chicago Salvation Army to honor women who served doughnuts to soldiers during World War I. The holiday is traditionally celebrated on the first Friday of June.

 

 

 

* Dunkin’ Donuts: At participating Dunkin’ Donuts, get a free classic doughnut of your choice with the purchase of any beverage all day Friday while supplies last. Go here to find a Dunkin’ Donuts near you.

* Krispy Kreme: Get one free doughnut of your choice, no purchase necessary at participating locations. Go here to learn more and find participating shops.

One of America’s Favorites – Beignet

February 27, 2017 at 6:16 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Potato beignet

Potato beignet

 

Beignet (English pronunciation: /bɛnˈjeɪ/; French: [bɛɲɛ], literally bump), synonymous with the English “fritter”, is the French term for a pastry made from deep-fried choux pastry. Beignets may also be made from other types of dough, including yeast dough.

 

 

 

The tradition of deep-frying fruits for a side dish dates to the time of Ancient Rome, while the tradition of beignets in Europe is speculated to have originated with a heavy influence of Islamic culinary tradition. The term beignet can be applied to two varieties, depending on the type of pastry. The French-style beignet in the United States, has the specific meaning of deep-fried choux pastry. Beignets can also be made with yeast pastry, which might be called boules de Berlin in French, referring to Berliner doughnuts which have a spherical shape (in other words, they do not have the typical doughnut hole) filled with fruit or jam.

In Corsica, beignets made with chestnut flour (Beignets de farine de châtaigne) are known as fritelli.

Donuts (doughnuts) in Quebec and elsewhere in Canada are referred to as both Beigne and Beignet in French.

 

Beignets from Café du Monde in New Orleans

Beignets from Café du Monde in New Orleans

Beignets are commonly known in New Orleans as a breakfast served with powdered sugar on top. They are traditionally prepared right before consumption to be eaten fresh and hot. Variations of fried dough can be found across cuisines internationally; however, the origin of the term beignet is specifically French. In the United States, beignets have been popular within New Orleans Creole cuisine and are customarily served as a dessert or in some sweet variation. They were brought to New Orleans in the 18th century by French colonists, from “the old mother country”, and became a large part of home-style Creole cooking, variations often including banana or plantain – popular fruits in the port city. Today, Café du Monde is a popular New Orleans food destination specializing in beignets with powdered sugar, coffee with chicory, and café au lait. Beignets were declared the official state doughnut of Louisiana in 1986.

 
Preparation
Ingredients used to prepare beignets traditionally include:

* lukewarm water
* granulated sugar
* evaporated milk
* bread flour
* shortening
* oil or lard, for deep-frying
* confectioners’ sugar

 

One of America’s Favorites – Monkey Bread

December 19, 2016 at 5:51 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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monkey-bread

Monkey bread, also called monkey puzzle bread, sticky bread, African coffee cake, golden crown, pinch-me cake, and pluck-it cake is a soft, sweet, sticky pastry served in the United States for breakfast or as a treat. It consists of pieces of soft baked dough sprinkled with cinnamon. It is often served at fairs and festivals.

 

 

 
The origin of the term “monkey bread” comes from the pastry being a finger food, the consumer would pick apart the bread as a monkey would.

 

another-image-of-monkey-bread
Recipes for the bread first appeared in American women’s magazines and community cookbooks in the 1950s, but the dish is still virtually unknown outside the United States. The bread is made with pieces of sweet yeast dough (often frozen), which are baked in a cake pan at high heat after first being individually covered in melted butter, cinnamon, sugar, and chopped pecans. It is traditionally served hot so that the baked segments can be easily torn away with the fingers and eaten by hand.

One of America’s Favorites – Tarts

September 26, 2016 at 4:59 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Blueberry tart

Blueberry tart

A tart is a baked dish consisting of a filling over a pastry base with an open top not covered with pastry. The pastry is usually short crust pastry; the filling may be sweet or savoury, though modern tarts are usually fruit-based, sometimes with custard. Tartlet refers to a miniature tart; an example would be egg tarts. The categories of ‘tart’, ‘flan’, ‘quiche’, and ‘pie’ overlap, with no sharp distinctions.

 

 

 
The French word tarte can be translated to mean either pie or tart, as both are mainly the same with the exception of a pie usually covering the filling in pastry, while flans and tarts leave it open.

Tarts are thought to have either come from a tradition of layering food, or to be a product of Medieval pie making. Enriched dough (i.e. short crust) is thought to have been first commonly used in 1550, approximately 200 years after pies. In this period, they were viewed as high-cuisine, popular with nobility, in contrast to the view of a commoners pie. While originally savory, with meat fillings, culinary tastes led to sweet tarts to prevail, filling tarts instead with fruit and custard.Early medieval tarts generally had meat fillings, but later ones were often based on fruit and custard.

An early tart was the Italian crostata, dating to at least the mid-15th century. It has been described as a “rustic free-form version of an open fruit tart”.

 
Tarts are typically free-standing with firm pastry base consisting of dough, itself made of flour, thick filling, and perpendicular sides while pies may have softer pastry, looser filling, and sloped sides, necessitating service from the pie plate.

 

 

Apple Tart

Apple Tart

There are many types of tarts, with popular varieties including Treacle tart, meringue tart, tarte tatin and Bakewell tart. Another popular tart flavor is jam tarts, which may be different colors depending on the flavor of the jam used to fill them.

Tarte Tatin is an upside-down tart, of apples, other fruit, or onions.

Savoury tarts include quiche, a family of savory tarts with a mostly custard filling; German Zwiebelkuchen ‘onion tart’, and Swiss cheese tart made from Gruyere.

 

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Sweet Potato & Turkey Pastries

March 4, 2016 at 5:52 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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For this week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week, a Sweet Potato & Turkey Pastries. An easily prepared pastry recipe! Break out the Crock Pot for this healthy and delicious Sweet Potato & Turkey Pastries. You’ll use JENNIE-O® Boneless OVEN READY™ Turkey, Mashed Sweet Potatoes, Green Peas, and Gravy. You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O website along with all their other delicious recipes and cooking tips. Enjoy! http://www.jennieo.com/

 

 

Sweet Potato & Turkey Pastries

Ingredients
1 (2 to 2 ½-pound) package JENNIE-O® Boneless OVEN READY™ TurkeySweet Potato & Turkey Pastries
1 cup gravy, made according to package directions
½ (21-ounce) package HORMEL® COUNTRY CROCK® Mashed Sweet Potatoes
½ cup frozen green peas, thawed
1 (17.3-ounce) package ready-rolled puff pastry, thawed according to package directions
1 egg, lightly beaten or ¼ cup egg substitute
Directions
1 – In slow cooker, cook turkey as specified on the package. Always cook to well- done, 165°F. as measured by a meat thermometer. Let rest 10 minutes. Dice turkey. Place half in large bowl. Refrigerate reaming for another use.

2 – Heat oven to 375°F. Mist baking sheet with cooking spray; set aside. In large bowl, combine turkey, gravy, potatoes and peas.

3 – Cut each sheet puff pastry into 9 equal pieces. Place 1 tablespoon turkey mixture on one corner of one piece of pastry. Fold pastry over to enclose filling making a triangular shape. Press edges together with fork. Place on baking sheet. Brush with egg. Repeat with remaining filling, pastry and egg. Bake 25 minutes or until golden brown. Makes 18.

Nutritional InformationJennie O Make the Switch
Calories 320 Fat 17g
Protein 14g Cholesterol 20mg
Carbohydrates 28g Sodium 670mg
Fiber 2g Saturated Fat 4.5g
Sugars 6g

http://www.jennieo.com/recipes/731-Sweet-Potato-and-Turkey-Pastries

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 30, 2015 at 5:57 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When baking cakes and cookies, the ingredients should always be at room temperature. For pastry, it is just the opposite-the ingredients should be cold.

Maize Dishes – Battered Sausage and Cachapa

January 18, 2015 at 6:42 AM | Posted in Maize Dishes | Leave a comment
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1 – Battered Sausage

A battered sausage, sliced in half after cooking

A battered sausage, sliced in half after cooking

Battered sausages are a type of cuisine, found all across the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand, They are similar in concept to a corn dog (a hot dog sausage coated in a thick layer of cornmeal batter) but normally are not served on a stick. In Australia, it may be referred to as a sav in batter (savaloy is a type of sausage). This may also have given rise to the local expression “fair suck of the sav”. In New Zealand, they can be found either with or without a stick inserted (similar to a corn dog). If served with the stick, it is referred to as a hot dog and usually dipped in a generous amount of tomato sauce and consumed immediately. In Australia, this variant may also be referred to as a Pluto Pop or a Dagwood Dog. They consist of a pork sausage dipped in batter (usually the same batter used to batter fish, as they are primarily sold from fish and chip shops), and usually served with chips.

There are 750 calories in a typical battered sausage and chips, but this varies greatly.

 

2 – Cachapa

Cachapa

Cachapa

Cachapas are a traditional Venezuelan and Colombian dish made from corn. Like arepas, they are popular at roadside stands. They can be made like pancakes of fresh corn dough, or wrapped in dry corn leaves and boiled (cachapa de hoja). The most common varieties are made with fresh ground corn mixed into a thick batter and cooked on a budare, like pancakes; the cachapa is slightly thicker and lumpier because of the pieces from corn kernels.

Cachapas are traditionally eaten with Queso de Mano (hand[made] cheese), a soft, mozzarella-like cheese, and occasionally with fried pork chicharrón on the side. Cachapas can be very elaborate, some including different kinds of cheese, milky cream, or jam. They can be prepared as an appetizer, generally with margarine, or as a full breakfast with hand cheese and fried pork.

In Costa Rica, chorreadas are similar.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Pigs in Blankets

February 3, 2014 at 9:53 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites, Pillsbury | Leave a comment
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American-style pigs in a blanket

American-style pigs in a blanket

Pigs in blankets (also known as Wesley Dogs in parts of the US, and kilted sausages in Scotland[citation needed] refers to a variety of different sausage-based foods in the United States, United Kingdom, Denmark, Australia, Ireland, Germany, Belgium, Russia, Canada, and Japan. They are typically small in size and can be eaten in one or two bites. For this reason, they are usually served as an appetizer or hors d’oeuvre or are accompanied by other dishes in the ‘main course’ section of a meal. In the West, especially in the United States and Canada, the bite-sized variety of pigs in a blanket is a common hors d’oeuvre served at cocktail parties and is often accompanied by a mustard or aioli dipping sauce.
Pigs in a blanket are usually different from sausage rolls, which are a larger, more filling item served for breakfast and lunch in parts of Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and, more rarely, the United States and Canada.

 

 

 

In the United States, the term “pigs in a blanket” often refers to hot dogs, Vienna sausages, cocktail or breakfast/link sausages wrapped in biscuit dough, pancake, or croissant dough, and baked. The dough is sometimes homemade, but canned dough is most common. They are somewhat similar to a sausage roll or (by extension) a baked corn dog. They are served as an appetizer, a children’s dish, or as a breakfast entree. A common variation is to stuff the hot dog or sausage with cheese before wrapping it in dough.
At breakfast or brunch, the term “pigs in a blanket” refers to sausage links with pancake wrapped around it.
In regions heavily influenced by Polish immigrants, such as northern Pennsylvania, the southern tier of New York, and northeastern Ohio, the term usually refers instead to stuffed cabbage rolls, such as the Polish gołąbki.
In much of central and southeast Texas (including Austin and Houston) the term “kolache” has been widely misappropriated to describe a variety of dough-wrapped breakfast goods, including sausages of several types wrapped in both biscuit and croissant dough.[citation needed] It would seem that the term “klobasnek” is more technically correct for this variety; perhaps[tone] “kolache” was deemed easier to pronounce and was therefore seized upon by local merchants. They can be found in virtually every doughnut shop, and at least one “kolache-themed” chain is currently in operation.
The American Farm Bureau Foundation’s Dates to Celebrate Agriculture calendar includes a “National Pigs-in-a-Blanket Day” to be observed every April 24.

 

 

 

Christmas Dinner in the UK - pigs in blankets at top right of plate

Christmas Dinner in the UK – pigs in blankets at top right of plate

In the United Kingdom, “pigs in blankets” refers to small sausages (usually Chipolatas) wrapped in bacon. They are a traditional accompaniment to roast turkey for Christmas dinner. They are also known as Tiger tails in The Westcountry. Pigs in blankets can be accompanied with devils on horseback, an appetizer of prunes, or less commonly dates, wrapped in bacon.

 

 

 

The name can also refer to klobasnek (a kind of kolache filled with sausage or ham slices). The German Würstchen im Schlafrock (“sausage in a dressing gown”) uses sausages wrapped in puff pastry or, more rarely, pancakes. Cheese and bacon are sometimes present.
In Russia, this dish is named Сосиска в тесте (Sosiska v teste, “sausage in dough”).
In Israel, Moshe Ba’Teiva (Moses in the ark) is a children’s dish consisting of a hot dog rolled in a ketchup-covered sheet of puff pastry or phyllo dough and baked.
In Denmark, they have a dish similar to the British-style dish known as the “Pølse i svøb” which means “Sausage in blanket”. The American-style Pigs in a blanket are known as “Pølsehorn”, meaning “Sausage horns”.
In Finland, pigs in blanket is known as “nakkipiilo”, which means “hidden sausage” if it is translated freely.
In Mexico, the sausage is wrapped in tortilla and deep fried in vegetable oil. The name “salchitaco” comes from the fusion of the words “salchicha”(sausage) and taco (sausage taco).

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s my favorite way to make a Pig in the Blanket, from http://www.pillsbury.com/recipes/crescent-dogs/b19c6c07-bad8-45b5-8a4e-e604f30baa98?p=1  When I make these I use Hillshire Farms Turkey Lil Smokies and the Pillsbury Reduced Fat Crescent Rolls.

 

 

Crescent Dogs

Ingredients:
8 hot dogs
4 slices (3/4 oz each) American cheese, each cut into 6 strips
1 can (8 oz) Pillsbury® refrigerated crescent dinner rolls

Directions:

1 – Heat oven to 375°F. Slit hot dogs to within 1/2 inch of ends; insert 3 strips of cheese into each slit.
2 – Separate dough into triangles. Wrap dough triangle around each hot dog. Place on ungreased cookie sheet, cheese side up.
3 – Bake at 375°F. for 12 to 15 minutes or until golden brown.
Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Sandwich Calories290 ( Calories from Fat200), % Daily Value Total Fat23g23% (Saturated Fat9g,9% Trans Fat2g2% ), Cholesterol35mg35%; Sodium810mg810%; Total Carbohydrate13g13% (Dietary Fiber0g0% Sugars4g4% ), Protein9g9% ; % Daily Value*: Vitamin A2%; Vitamin C0%; Calcium6%; Iron6%;
Exchanges:1 Starch; 0 Fruit; 0 Other Carbohydrate; 0 Skim Milk; 0 Low-Fat Milk; 0 Milk; 0 Vegetable; 0 Very Lean Meat; 0 Lean Meat; 1 High-Fat Meat; 2 1/2 Fat;
Carbohydrate Choices:1
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Mincemeat Pie

January 1, 2014 at 9:20 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Recently I had posted a recipe for a low-calorie Mince Pie and now I’ve got a Buffalo Mincemeat Pie from Jill O’Brien and Wild Idea Buffalo. Enjoy and Happy New Year!

 

 
Buffalo Mincemeat PieWild Idea Buffalo Buffalo Mincemeat Pie
By: Jill O’Brien

 

 

Mincemeat Pie with Cilantro Yogurt Sauce

Serves 8 to 12 entrée or 46 Petite Pies (which are great for hors d’oeuvres)

Note: This recipe is a main dish pie. Do not let the length of this recipe detour you. Although there is a little work involved ahead of time, it is fairly easy and is a perfect make a head dish that will fill your house with delicious aromatic aromas.

 

 

Mincemeat Ingredients:

2 tsp. cumin
2 tsp. cardamom
2 tsp. ginger
2 tsp. black pepper
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. cinnamon
½ tsp. allspice
½ tsp. cayenne
½ tsp. turmeric
½ tsp. cloves
1 Tb. olive oil
1 2 lb. pkg. Ready to use Buffalo Stew Meat, rinse & pat dry
1 onion, chopped
1 Tb. garlic, chopped
3 Tb. lemon juice
½ cup raisins
2 apples, peeled & chopped
½ cup bourbon (Buffalo Trace)
1 cup apple cider
1 Tb. molasses

 

Directions:

 

* Mix all dry spices together and set aside.
* Heat oil in heavy stock pot over medium high heat.
* Add stew meat and stir, cook for 3 minutes.
* Add onion and spices, stirring to incorporate. Cook for 5 minutes.
* Add garlic, lemon juice, raisins and apples and stir to incorporate.
* Add bourbon and then cider. Stir to incorporate and bring to a boil.
* Reduce heat to medium low, cover and simmer for 30 minutes.
* Remove cover and continue to cook until most (but not all) of the liquids are removed.
* Place ingredients into food processor and pulse puree until meat is finely minced.
* Cover & set aside.
* Pie Crust

Makes, 1 double pie crust. This is a heartier crust that stands up nicely to the mincemeat.

 

 

Ingredients:

2 cups unbleached flour
1 cup whole wheat flour
1 tsp. salt
2 tsp. sugar
1½ sticks butter, cut into small pieces
3 eggs, beaten

 

 

Directions:
* Place dry ingredients in a mixer and incorporate.
* Add butter pieces at a time.
* Add eggs slowly.
* Remove dough from mixer onto floured surface and lightly dust.
* Divide dough into 2 parts and roll out slightly between floured parchment papers.
* Line 8” deep pie pan with rolled pastry, dough should hangover the edge.
* Fill with mincemeat, spreading around evenly.
* Top with remaining pastry round, pinching top & bottom pastry together, pulling any excess off. Create pie edge with fingers or fork.
* With remaining pastry roll out and cut into leave patterns and place on top of pie.
* Cut 3 slits into top of pie pastry.
* Bake pie in a 375* oven for 1 hour, crust should be golden brown. Or refrigerate and bake at a later time.

* Serve pie with Cilantro Yogurt Sauce. Super Delicious!

 

 

 

Cilantro Yogurt Sauce

Makes 1 ½ cups

Ingredients:

1 cup whole milk or low-fat vanilla yogurt
2 cups fresh cilantro, chopped
¼ cup fresh mint leaves
1 jalapeno, seeded
2 tablespoons garlic, chopped
1 teaspoon cumin
1 tablespoon lemon juice
½ teaspoon salt
½ cup cucumber, finely chopped

 

Directions:
Place all ingredients except cucumbers into blender and puree. Fold in cucumbers if desired. Keep refrigerated, but pull ½ hour before serving.

This sauce is great on many things and keeps for 1 week in refrigerator.

 

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2013/buffalo-mincemeat-pie/

 

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Stew Meat
Stew Meat – 2 Lb
Flavorful, healthy and incredibly easily. Pre-cut from our buffalo roasts, the ready to use stew meat is super convenient! Great for soups, stews, or stroganoff. 2 lb. Package (Also available in 1 lb. pack)

 

 

http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/collections/a-la-carte/products/2-lb-stew-meat

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