Healthy Halloween Party Recipes

October 20, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Halloween Party Recipes. Find some Scary, Ghoulish and Healthy Halloween Party Recipes with recipes including Pumpkin Pancakes, Spiced Pumpkin Cookies, and Cheese and Spinach-Stuffed Portobellos. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Halloween Party Recipes
Find healthy, delicious Halloween party recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Pumpkin Pancakes
This healthy whole-grain pumpkin pancake recipe produces fluffy cakes with a beautiful orange hue from pureed pumpkin and light crunch from toasted pecans. If you want to experiment with different types of whole grains, replace up to 1/2 cup of the whole-wheat flour with cornmeal, oats and/or buckwheat flour. Or add extra fiber and omega-3s by adding up to 3 tablespoons of ground flaxseed or chia seeds……..

Spiced Pumpkin Cookies
The deep flavors of molasses, cinnamon, ginger, allspice and nutmeg make these wholesome pumpkin cookies delicious without the addition of butter–and they lend themselves beautifully to the inclusion of whole-wheat flour. They are also the perfect texture for a sandwich cookie–fill them with a slightly sweetened cream cheese frosting……..

Cheese and Spinach-Stuffed Portobellos
Here we take the elements of a vegetarian lasagna filling–ricotta, spinach and Parmesan cheese–and nestle them into roasted portobello mushroom caps. The recipe works best with very large portobello caps; if you can only find smaller ones, buy one or two extra and divide the filling among all the caps. Serve with a tossed salad and a whole-wheat dinner roll or spaghetti tossed with marinara sauce………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Halloween Party Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19878/holidays-occasions/halloween/party-recipes/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

August 6, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Lumpy batter………

To make extra-fluffy pancakes, leave a few lumps in the batter. If you stir your batter just enough to mix all the ingredients but not enough to create a smooth texture your pancakes will end up perfectly fluffy. Enjoy those pancakes!

Healthy Banana Recipes

June 30, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Banana Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Banana Recipes with recipes including Banana Pancakes, Blueberry-Banana Overnight Oats, and Banana Pudding Parfaits. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Banana Recipes
Find healthy, delicious banana recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Two-Ingredient Banana Pancakes
These delicious and unbelievably simple pancakes are best enjoyed right after cooking. With just eggs and a banana, you can have healthy grain-free pancakes with no added sugar. Serve with maple syrup and yogurt or ricotta cheese to add in some protein………..

Blueberry-Banana Overnight Oats
Blueberries, sweet banana and creamy coconut milk combine to turn everyday oatmeal into the best vegan overnight oats! Make up to 4 jars at once to keep in the fridge for quick grab-and-go breakfasts throughout the week………..

Banana Pudding Parfaits
These individual banana puddings contain all of those delicious traditional banana pudding flavors in a healthy little parfait package. This recipe is part of our Juneteenth Family Cookout Menu………………

*Click the link below to get all the Healthy Banana Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19193/ingredients/fruit/banana/

Healthy Apple Recipes

March 20, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Apple Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Apple Recipes including recipes like Apple-Peanut Butter Smoothie, Apple Dutch Baby Pancake, and Apple, Bacon and Sweet Potato Mini Casseroles. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Apple-Peanut Butter Smoothie
Apples and peanut butter are a classic pair-try them blended together in this healthy smoothie recipe……………….

Apple Dutch Baby Pancake
This one-pan puffy oven-baked pancake recipe will wow brunch guests. Make it your own by swapping out the apple for pear slices, or switch up the spices and try cardamom or ginger in place of the cinnamon………………

Apple, Bacon and Sweet Potato Mini Casseroles
These sweet and savory mini casseroles are ready in just an hour. Refrigerate or freeze the leftovers to enjoy later…………………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Apple Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19190/ingredients/fruit/apple/

One of America’s Favorites – Scrambled Eggs

October 26, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Scrambled eggs with grated cheese.

Scrambled eggs is a dish made from whites and yolks of eggs (usually chicken eggs) stirred or beaten together, typically with salt and butter and variable other ingredients, and then gently heated in a pan while being stirred.

Only eggs are necessary to make scrambled eggs, but nearly always salt is used, and very often other ingredients such as water, milk, butter, cream or in some cases creme fraiche or grated cheese may be added. The eggs are cracked into a bowl; with some salt, and the mixture is stirred or whisked. More consistent and far quicker results are obtained if a small amount of thickener such as cornstarch, potato starch or flour is added; this enables much quicker cooking with reduced risk of overcooking, even when less butter is used.

The mixture can be poured into a hot pan containing melted butter or oil, where it starts coagulating. The heat is turned down and the eggs are stirred as they cook. This creates small, soft curds of egg. Unlike pancake or omelette scrambled egg is virtually never browned.

Once the liquid has mostly set, additional ingredients such as ham, herbs, cheese or cream may be folded in over low heat, just until incorporated. The eggs are usually slightly undercooked when removed from heat, since the eggs will continue to set. If any liquid is seeping from the eggs (syneresis), this is a sign of undercooking, overcooking or adding undercooked high-moisture vegetables.

Scrambled eggs with bacon and pancakes

Variations
* English style. In English style the scrambled eggs are stirred very thoroughly during cooking to give a soft, fine texture
* American style – In American style the eggs are scooped in towards the middle of the pan as they set, giving larger curds.
* Scrambled eggs can be made easily sous-vide, which gives the traditional smooth creamy texture and requires only occasionally mixing during cooking.
* Another technique for cooking creamy scrambled eggs is to pipe steam into eggs with butter via a steam wand (as found on an espresso machine).
* Scrambled eggs can also be cooked in a Microwave oven.

 

Classical haute cuisine preparation calls for serving scrambled eggs in a deep silver dish. They can also be presented in small croustades made from hollowed-out brioche or tartlets. When eaten for breakfast, scrambled eggs often accompany toast, bacon, smoked salmon, hash browns, cob, pancakes, ham or sausages. Popular condiments served with scrambled eggs include ketchup, hot sauce, and Worcestershire sauce.

 

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!              

September 9, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Flip those Pancakes…………………….

When making Pancakes – Squeeze round pancakes on an oiled skillet. Watch for bitty bubbles around the edges for a hint at the optimal turn time. Use a spatula to gently peek at the bottom and if it’s lightly browned, give it a flip. Enjoy those Cakes!

Kitchen Hint of the Day! MONDAY

July 27, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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If they bubble flip those pancakes………………

Squeeze round pancakes on an oiled skillet. Watch for small bubbles around the edges for a hint at the optimal turn time. Use a spatula to gently peek at the bottom and if it’s lightly browned, give it a flip. Enjoy those cakes!

One of America’s Favorites – Quick Bread

April 20, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Banana bread is a type of quick bread

Quick bread is any bread leavened with leavening agents other than yeast or eggs. An advantage of quick breads is their ability to be prepared quickly and reliably, without requiring the time-consuming skilled labor and the climate control needed for traditional yeast breads.

Quick breads include many cakes, brownies and cookies—as well as banana bread, beer bread, biscuits, cornbread, muffins, pancakes, scones, and soda bread.

“Quick bread” most probably originated in the United States at the end of the eighteenth century. Before the creation of quick bread, baked goods were leavened either with yeast or by mixing dough with eggs. “Fast bread” is an alternate name.

The discovery or rediscovery of chemical leavening agents and their widespread military, commercial, and home use in the United States dates back to 1846 with the introduction of commercial baking soda in New York, by Church and Dwight of “Arm & Hammer” fame. This development was extended in 1856 by the introduction of commercial baking powder in Massachusetts, although perhaps the best known form of baking powder is “Calumet”, first introduced in Hammond, Indiana and West Hammond, Illinois (later Calumet City, Illinois) in 1889. Both forms of food-grade chemical leaveners are still being produced under their original names, although not within the same corporate structure.

During the American Civil War (1861–1865), the demand for portable and quickly-made food was high, while skilled labor for traditional breadmaking was scarce. This encouraged the adoption of bread which was rapidly made and leavened with baking soda, instead of yeast. The shortage of chemical leaveners in the American South during the Civil War contributed to a food crisis there.

As the Industrial Revolution accelerated, the marketing of mass-produced prepackaged foods was eased by the use of chemical leaveners, which could produce consistent products regardless of variations in source ingredients, time of year, geographical location, weather conditions, and many other factors that could cause problems with environmentally sensitive, temperamental yeast formulations. These factors were traded off against the loss of traditional yeast flavor, nutrition, and texture.

Preparing a quick bread generally involves two mixing containers. One contains all dry ingredients (including chemical leavening agents or agent) and one contains all wet ingredients (possibly including liquid ingredients that are slightly acidic in order to initiate the leavening process). In some variations, the dry ingredients are in a bowl and the wet ingredients are heated sauces in a saucepan off-heat and cooled.

During the chemical leavening process, agents (one or more food-grade chemicals—usually a weak acid and a weak base) are added into the dough during mixing. These agents undergo a chemical reaction to produce carbon dioxide, which increases the baked good’s volume and produces a porous structure and lighter texture. Yeast breads often take hours to rise, and the resulting baked good’s texture can vary greatly based on external factors such as temperature and humidity. By contrast, breads made with chemical leavening agents are relatively uniform, reliable, and quick. Usually, the resulting baked good is softer and lighter than a traditional yeast bread.

Chemical leavening agents include a weak base, such as baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) plus a weak acid, such as cream of tartar, lemon juice, or cultured buttermilk, to create an acid–base reaction that releases carbon dioxide. (Quick bread leavened specifically with baking soda is often called “soda bread”.) Baking powder contains both an acid and a base in dry powdered form, and simply needs a liquid medium in which to react. Other alternative leavening agents are egg whites mechanically beaten to form stiff peaks, as in the case of many waffle recipes, or steam, in the case of cream puffs. Nevertheless, in a commercial process, designated chemical leavening acids and bases are used to make gas production consistent and controlled. Almost all quick breads have the same basic ingredients: flour, leavening, eggs, fat (butter, margarine, shortening, or oil), and liquid such as milk. Ingredients beyond these basic constituents are added for variations in flavor and texture. The type of bread produced varies based predominantly on the method of mixing, the major flavoring, and the ratio of liquid in the batter. Some batters are thin enough to pour, and others thick enough to mold into lumps.

There are three basic methods for making quick breads, which may combine the “rise” of the chemical leavener with advantageous “lift” from other ingredients:

* The stirring method (also known as the quick-bread method, blending method, or muffin method) is used for pancakes, muffins, corn bread, dumplings, and fritters. It calls for measurement of dry and wet ingredients separately, then quickly mixing the two. Often the wet ingredients include beaten eggs, which have trapped air that helps the product to rise. In these recipes, the fats are liquid, such as cooking oil. Usually mixing is done using a tool with a wide head such as a spoon or spatula to prevent the dough from becoming over-beaten, which would break down the egg’s lift.
* The creaming method is frequently used for cake batters. The butter and sugar are “creamed”, or beaten together until smooth and fluffy. Eggs and liquid flavoring are mixed in, and finally dry and liquid ingredients are added in. The creaming method combines rise gained from air bubbles in the creamed butter with the rise from the chemical leaveners. Gentle folding in of the final ingredients avoids destroying these air pockets.
* The shortening method, also known as the biscuit method, is used for biscuits and sometimes scones. This method cuts solid fat (whether lard, butter, or vegetable shortening) into flour and other dry ingredients using a food processor, pastry blender, or two hand-held forks. The layering from this process gives rise and adds flakiness as the folds of fat melt during baking. This technique is said to produce “shortened” cakes and breads, regardless of whether or not the chosen fat is vegetable shortening.

Quick breads also vary widely in the consistency of their dough or batter. There are four main types of quick bread batter:

Pancake batter is made using the stirring method

* Pour batters, such as pancake batter, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:1 and so pours in a steady stream. Also called a “low-ratio” baked good.
* Drop batters, such as cornbread and muffin batters, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:2.
* Soft doughs, such as many chocolate chip cookie doughs, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:3. Soft doughs stick significantly to work surfaces.
* Stiff doughs, such as pie crust and sugar cookie doughs, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:8. Stiff doughs are easy to work in that they only minimally stick to work surfaces, including tools and hands. Also called “high-ratio” baked good.
The above are volumetric ratios and are not based on baker’s percentages or weights.

 

Diabetic Dish of the Week – Diabetic Golden Multigrain Pancake Recipe

April 14, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Recipe of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is Diabetic Golden Multigrain Pancake Recipe. Start your morning off right with this week’s recipe of Diabetic Golden Multigrain Pancake Recipe. This one is made using Whole Wheat Flour, Flour, Cornmeal, Old Fashioned Oats, Baking Powder, Reduced Fat Buttermilk, Eggs, Honey, Vegetable Oil, and Non Stick Cooking Spray. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Diabetic Golden Multigrain Pancake Recipe
Ingredients
Preparation time: 25 minutes

3/4 cup whole wheat flour
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup cornmeal
1/2 cup old-fashioned oats
1 tablespoon baking powder
2 cups reduced-fat buttermilk
2 eggs
1 1/2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
Nonstick cooking spray

Directions
Yield: 13 pancakes
Serving size: 2 pancakes

* In a mixing bowl, combine flours, cornmeal, oats, and baking powder. In a separate mixing bowl, combine buttermilk, eggs, honey, and vegetable oil until smooth. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients, stirring until a smooth batter forms. Spray a griddle or skillet with nonstick cooking spray and heat it over medium heat. To make pancakes, pour 1/4 cup batter for each pancake onto the hot griddle. When bubbles form and pop, flip each pancake over with a spatula and cook the other side for an additional minute. Repeat until all batter is used. Serve immediately.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 260 calories, Carbohydrates: 42 g, Protein: 10 g, Fat: 6 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Sodium: 314 mg, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/breakfast/golden-multigrain-pancakes/

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One of America’s Favorites – Pancakes

December 23, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A stack of blueberry pancakes

A pancake (or hotcake, griddlecake, or flapjack, not to be confused with oat bar flapjacks) is a flat cake, often thin and round, prepared from a starch-based batter that may contain eggs, milk and butter and cooked on a hot surface such as a griddle or frying pan, often frying with oil or butter. Archaeological evidence suggests that pancakes were probably the earliest and most widespread cereal food eaten in prehistoric societies.

The pancake’s shape and structure varies worldwide. In England, pancakes are often unleavened and resemble a crêpe. In North America, a leavening agent is used (typically baking powder) creating a thick fluffy pancake. A crêpe is a thin Breton pancake of French origin cooked on one or both sides in a special pan or crepe maker to achieve a lacelike network of fine bubbles. A well-known variation originating from southeast Europe is a palačinke, a thin moist pancake fried on both sides and filled with jam, cheese cream, chocolate, or ground walnuts, but many other fillings—sweet or savoury—can also be used.

When potato is used as a major portion of the batter, the result is a potato pancake. Commercially prepared pancake mixes are available in some countries. When buttermilk is used in place of or in addition to milk, the pancake develops a tart flavor and becomes known as a buttermilk pancake, which is common in Scotland and the US. Buckwheat flour can be used in a pancake batter, making for a type of buckwheat pancake, a category that includes Blini, Kaletez, Ploye, and Memil-buchimgae.

Silver dollar pancakes

Pancakes may be served at any time of the day with a variety of toppings or fillings but in America they are typically considered a breakfast food. Pancakes serve a similar function to waffles. In Britain and the Commonwealth, they are associated with Shrove Tuesday, commonly known as “Pancake Day”, when, historically, perishable ingredients had to be used up before the fasting period of Lent.

American and Canadian pancakes (sometimes called hotcakes, griddlecakes, or flapjacks) are usually served at breakfast, in a stack of two or three, topped with real or artificial maple syrup and butter. They are often served with other items such as bacon, toast, eggs or sausage. Other popular topping alternatives include jam, peanut butter, nuts, fruit, honey, powdered sugar, whipped cream, cane syrup, cinnamon and sugar, and molasses. In addition, when a pancake is occasionally served as a dessert, toppings such as ice cream, chocolate syrup, and various fruits are often used.

The thick batter contains eggs, flour, milk, and a leavening agent such as baking powder. The batter can have ingredients such as buttermilk, blueberries, strawberries, bananas, apples, chocolate chips, cheese, or sugar added. Spices such as cinnamon, vanilla and nutmeg can also be used. Yogurt may be used to give the pancakes a relatively moist consistency. Pancakes may be ⅓ inch thick and about 4 inches in diameter.

In the US, Mexico and Canada, the franchised restaurant chain International House of Pancakes (IHOP) serves pancakes all day. The Original Pancake House is another chain of pancake restaurants across the US, and Walker Brothers is a series of pancake houses in the Chicago area that developed as a franchised spin-off of The Original Pancake House.

Pancakes and syrup at a pancake feed event

The popularity of pancakes in Australia has spawned the Pancake Parlour and Pancakes on the Rocks franchised restaurants. In British Columbia and Alberta, Canada, the restaurant chain De Dutch serves Dutch and Flemish-style pannenkoeken.

Pancakes are traditionally eaten on Shrove Tuesday, which is known as “Pancake Day” in Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand, and Australia, and “Pancake Tuesday” in Ireland and Scotland. (Shrove Tuesday is better known in the United States, France, and other countries as Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday.) Historically, pancakes were made on Shrove Tuesday so that the last of the fat or lard was used up before Lent. No meat products should be eaten during Lent.

 

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