Fried Okeechobee Crappie w/ Hash Browns and Collard Greens

September 30, 2013 at 5:04 PM | Posted in Crappie, fish, hash browns, Zatarain's | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Fried Okeechobee Crappie w/ Hash Browns and Collard Greens

CRAPPIE 001

 

 

A dreary and cloudy day out today. Had to run my parents to Cincinnati for my Dad to get a new portable breather. He’s had a home oxygen for a while now but he’s going to have to keep a portable air with him when he’s out. A lot going on locally with Operation Pumpkin in Hamilton and Jungle Jim’s Ring of Fire Weekend in Fairfield, you can read about both in two earlier posts. For dinner tonight, Fried Okeechobee Crappie w/ Hash Browns and Collard Greens.

 

 
It’s always a sad day when I use my last bags of the Lake Okeechobee Crappie, or as the locals there call them “Specks”. My cousin always brings me a batch when they go down for the winter at Lake Okeechobee, Florida. I try to make them last as long as I can but the time has come to break that last bag out of the freezer. I love all fish but these are my favorite fresh water fish by far! Love the taste and just how they fry up so good and brown. I laid the last bag out last night to thaw in the fridge. I rinsed the fillets off in cold water and patted dry with a paper towel. I then seasoned them a bit of Sea Salt and then rolled them in Zatarain’s Crispy Southern Fish Fri Breading Mix. Pan fried them in Canola Oil about 3 minutes per side. As usual with Crappie they came out Golden Brown and delicious!

CRAPPIE 005

 

For side dishes I prepared Hash Browns and Collard Greens. I used Simply Potatoes Hash Browns, my favorite Potato side dishes. Fried in Canola Oil and seasoned them with Sea Salt, Ground Pepper, and Parsley. Also, for the first time, I prepared Collard Greens. They were canned and Walmart Store Brand. Just heated them in a small sauce pan on medium high for 5 minutes, drained, and season with Sea Salt. I think I had Collard Greens 1 other time. They came out very good, a good change of pace for a side dish! For dessert later tonight a bowl of Del Monte No Sugar Added Peach Chunks.

 

 

 

 

Zatarain’s Crispy Southern Fish FriZatarain's Crispy Southeren Fish Fri
The secret of authentic Southern style fried fish is the crispy combination of cornmeal, corn flour, spices and lemon juice captured in this special Zatarain’s Frying Mix.

Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
Calories: 60

Calories from Fat: 0

Total Fat: 0g 0%

Saturated Fat: 0g 0%

Cholesterol: 0mg 0%

Sodium: 630mg 26%

Total Carb: 12g 4%

Dietary Fiber: 0 0%

Sugar: 0g

Protein: 1g

Vitamin A: 2%

 

http://www.zatarains.com/Products/Breadings-and-Fry-Mixes/Crispy-Southern-Fish-Fri.aspx

Seasoned Breaded Fried Haddock w/ Au Gratin Potatoes, Boiled Sliced Carrots, and…

June 11, 2013 at 5:17 PM | Posted in carrots, fish, Idahoan Potato Products, Zatarain's | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Seasoned Breaded Fried Haddock w/ Au Gratin Potatoes, Boiled Sliced Carrots, and Baked Sour Dough Bread

 

 

 
Warming up out there today, 85 degrees for today and the rest of the week. First a Deer earlier this week and now I spotted a family of raccoons, Mama and 3 little ones roaming around the edge of the woods. For dinner tonight I prepared a Seasoned Breaded Fried Haddock w/ Au Gratin Potatoes, Boiled Carrots, and Baked Sour Dough Bread.

 
Layed out a Haddock Fillet in the fridge overnight to thaw. Rinsed it off, patted it dry, and seasoned it with Sea Salt and Ground Black Haddock 007Pepper. Sliced the fillet into smaller pieces and put them in a Hefty Zip Plastic Bag and added Zatarain’s Lemon Pepper Breading Mix, shook till the pieces were all well covered. I pan fried them in Canola Oil, fried skin side down about 4 minutes and turned them over and fried for another 3 minutes. i love using the Zatarain’s Breading Mix, all are seasoned just right and make a perfect crust.

 
For side dishes I reheated some Idahoan Au Gratin Potatoes that were leftover from the other night, heated up a small can of Del Monte Sliced Carrots, and baked the other half of the Goldminer California Sour Dough Bread. I could make a meal of baked bread! For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

Smoked Cheddar and Mushroom Bison Burger w/ Baked Crinkle Fries

January 2, 2013 at 6:30 PM | Posted in bison, cheese, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, mushrooms, Ore - Ida | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Smoked Cheddar and Mushroom Bison Burger w/ Baked Crinkle FriesSnowing Buffalo gal burger 007

I’m feeling a lot better than I was yesterday. No cough and congestion has cleared up. must have been a 24 hour bug. For dinner one of my favorites a Smoked Cheddar and Mushroom Bison Burger w/ Baked Crinkle Fries! Just love that Bison or Buffalo. I used another of the Buffalo Gal 1/3 Bison Patties. Their a really good looking plump Burger. I pan fried it on medium heat in Canola Oil about 4 minutes per side. The Burger came out moist and juicy with that fantastic Bison taste, excellent Bison Burger! I served it on a Healthy Life Whole Grain Bun topped with Sauteed Mushrooms and a slice of Borden Smoked Cheddar. I left the Buffalo Gal product info and web site link at the bottom of the post. For a side I had a serving of Baked Ore Ida Crinkle Fries. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

Buffalo Gal 1/3 lb. Bison Pattiesbuffalogal

Description
6 (1/3 lb.) ready to grill burgers. Extra lean. Receive 2 (1 lb.) packs. 100% Buffalo.

Nutrition (3.5 oz.):
Fat: 2g, Sat. Fat: .5g, Calories: 110, Calories from Fat: 15, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 22g, Cholesterol: 60mg, Sodium: 55mg

Suggested Cooking Tips:
Bison burger is lean (ranging from 93-96% lean) so when grilling or pan frying the burger – place it on medium heat – COVER. Allow the burger to do its cooking on one side. Don’t poke, smash or continually flip the burger because you want to maintain all of the moisture and fat in the meat. When burger appears mostly cooked – flip one time and in 30-45 seconds it should be ready to serve. You might find that using a meat thermometer is helpful when first cooking the burger. It should reach 160 degrees internal temp.

http://www.buffalogal.com/13-lb-Bison-Patties-P1.aspx

A Simple and Delicious Start of the Day!

November 4, 2012 at 11:58 AM | Posted in Bob Evan's, breakfast, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads | Leave a comment
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Got in that extra hour of sleep this morning with the clock’s being turned back for an hour. Woke up starving this morning and prepared just what sounded good. I had Hash Browns, Turkey Sausage, English Muffins, and Glazed Apples! I used; Simply Potatoes Hash Browns pan fried in 1 tablespoon of Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Bob Evans Turkey Sausage (my favorite Turkey Sausage Breakfast Links), Healthy Life Whole Grain Muffins (my usual choice of breads), and to top off and provide some fantastic flavor 1 1/2 tablespoons of Bob Evans Glazed Apples (love these Apples). You can prepare all this in about 20 minutes and you have one delicious and healthy breakfast! i added a cup of hot brewed Green tea and the Sunday Paper to make it complete.

Mushroom, Muenster, Bison Burger w/ Baked Crinkle Fries

May 31, 2012 at 5:20 PM | Posted in bison, diabetes, diabetes friendly, low calorie, low carb, mushrooms, Sargento's Cheese | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Mushroom, Muenster, Bison Burger w/ Baked Crinkle Fries

Broke out the Bison today for dinner! I had a Ground Bison Sirloin Burger that I seasoned with McCormick Grinder Steakhouse Seasoning. My grill was out of gas, stupid mistake on my part, so I pan Fried it in Extra Virgin Olive Oil about 4 minutes per side, a beautiful medium rare. I topped it with sauteed Baby Bella Mushrooms that I had seasoned with Ground Smoked Cumin, Parsley, Ground Thyme, and McCormick Grinder Sea Salt. I also topped it with a slice of Sargento Muenster Cheese. I love this Cheese, as I do most Cheese, it has a creamy natural taste to it and softens up just right on a hot food. For a side I had Ore Ida Baked Crinkle Fries. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

One of America’s Favorite – Fried Chicken

April 3, 2012 at 11:21 AM | Posted in chicken, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, grilling | 3 Comments
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Fried chicken (also referred to as Southern fried chicken) is a dish consisting of chicken pieces usually from broiler chickens which

Pieces of fried chicken

have been floured or battered and then pan fried, deep fried, or pressure fried. The breading adds a crisp coating or crust to the exterior. What separates fried chicken from other fried forms of chicken is that generally the chicken is cut at the joints and the bones and skin are left intact. Crisp well-seasoned skin, rendered of excess fat, is a hallmark of well made fried chicken.

Generally, chickens are not fried whole; instead, the chicken is divided into its four main constituent pieces: the two white meat sections are the breast and the wing from the front of the chicken, while the dark meat sections are from the rear of the chicken. To prepare the chicken pieces for frying, they are dredged in flour or a similar dry substance (possibly following marination or dipping in milk or buttermilk) to coat the meat and to develop a crust. Seasonings such as salt, pepper, cayenne pepper, paprika, garlic powder, onion powder, or ranch dressing mix can be mixed in with the flour. As the pieces of chicken cook, some of the moisture that exudes from the chicken is absorbed by the coating of flour and browns along with the flour, creating a flavorful crust. Traditionally, lard is used to fry the chicken, but corn oil, peanut oil, canola oil, or vegetable oil are also frequently used. The flavor of olive oil is generally considered too strong to be used for traditional fried chicken, and its low smoke point makes it unsuitable for use.

There are three main techniques for frying chickens: pan frying, deep frying and broasting. Pan frying (or shallow frying) requires a frying pan of sturdy construction and a source of fat that does not fully immerse the chicken. The chicken pieces are prepared as above, then fried. Generally the fat is heated to a temperature hot enough to seal (without browning, at this point) the outside of the chicken pieces. Once the pieces have been added to the hot fat and sealed, the temperature is reduced. There is debate as to how often to turn the chicken pieces, with one camp arguing for often turning and even browning, and the other camp pushing for letting the pieces render skin side down and only turning when absolutely necessary. Once the chicken pieces are close to being done the temperature is raised and the pieces are browned to the desired color (some cooks add small amounts of butter at this point to enhance browning). The moisture from the chicken that sticks and browns on the bottom of the pan become the fonds required to make gravy. Chicken Maryland is made when the pan of chicken pieces, and fat, is placed in the oven to cook, for a majority of the overall cooking time, basically “fried in the oven”.

Deep frying requires a deep fryer or other device in which the chicken pieces can be completely submerged in hot fat. The pieces are floured as above or battered using a batter of flour and liquid (and seasonings) mixed together. The batter can/may contain ingredients like eggs, milk, and leavening. The fat is heated in the deep fryer to the desired temperature. The pieces are added to the fat and a constant temperature is maintained throughout the cooking process.

Broasting uses a pressure cooker to accelerate the process. The moisture inside the chicken becomes steam and increases the pressure in the cooker, lowering the cooking temperature needed. The steam also cooks the chicken through, but still allows the pieces to be moist and tender while maintaining a crisp coating. Fat is heated in a pressure cooker. Chicken pieces are then floured or battered and then placed in the hot fat. The lid is placed on the pressure cooker, and the chicken pieces are thus fried under pressure.

Fritters have existed in Europe since the middle ages. The Scots, and later Scottish immigrants to the southern United States, had a tradition of deep frying chicken in fat, unlike their English counterparts who baked or boiled chicken.

Independent of this, a number of West African cuisines featured dishes where chicken was fried, typically in palm oil, sometimes having been battered before. These would be served on special occasions in some areas, or sometimes sold in the streets as snacks in others. This provided some means of independent economy for enslaved and segregated African American women, who became noted sellers of poultry (live or cooked) as early as the 1730s. Because of this and the expensive nature of the ingredients, it was, despite popular perception, a rare and special dish in the African-American community.

After the development of larger and faster-growing hogs (due to crosses between European and Asian breeds) in the 18th and 19th century, in the United States, backyard and small-scale hog production provided an inexpensive means of converting waste food, crop waste, and garbage into calories (in a relatively small space and in a relatively short period of time). Many of those calories came in the form of fat and rendered lard. Lard was used for almost all cooking and was a fundamental component in many common homestead foods (many that today are still regarded as holiday and comfort foods) like biscuits and pies. The economic/caloric necessity of consuming lard and other saved fats may have led to the popularity of fried foods, not only in the US, but worldwide. In the 19th century cast iron became widely available for use in cooking. The combination of flour, lard, a chicken and a heavy pan placed over a relatively controllable flame became the beginning of today’s fried chicken.

When it was introduced to the American South, fried chicken became a common staple. Later, as the slave trade led to Africans being brought to work on southern plantations, the slaves who became cooks incorporated seasonings and spices that were absent in traditional Scottish cuisine, enriching the flavor. Since most slaves were unable to raise expensive meats, but generally allowed to keep chickens, frying chicken on special occasions continued in the African American communities of the South. It endured the fall of slavery and gradually passed into common use as a general Southern dish. Since fried chicken traveled well in hot weather before refrigeration was commonplace, it gained further favor in the periods of American history when segregation closed off most restaurants to the black population. Fried chicken continues to be among this region’s top choices for “Sunday dinner” among both blacks and whites. Holidays such as Independence Day and other gatherings often feature this dish.

Since the American Civil War, traditional slave foods like fried chicken, watermelon, and chitterlings have suffered a strong association with African American stereotypes and blackface minstrelsy. This was commercialized for the first half of the 20th century by restaurants like Sambo’s and Coon Chicken Inn, which selected exaggerated depictions of blacks as mascots, implying quality by their association with the stereotype. Although also being acknowledged positively as “soul food” today, the affinity that African American culture has for fried chicken has been considered a delicate, often pejorative issue. While the perception of fried chicken as an ethnic dish has been fading for several decades, what with the ubiquity of fried chicken dishes in the US, it persists as a racial stereotype.

Before the industrialization of chicken production, and the creation of broiler breeds of chicken, only young spring chickens (pullets or cockerels) would be suitable for the higher heat and relatively fast cooking time of frying, making fried chicken a luxury of spring and summer. Older, tougher birds require longer cooking times at lower temperatures. To compensate for this, sometimes tougher birds are simmered till tender, allowed to cool and dry, and then fried. (This method is common in Australia.) Another method is to fry the chicken pieces using a pan fried method. The chicken pieces are then simmered in liquid, usually, a gravy made in the pan that the chicken pieces were cooked in. This process (of flouring, frying and simmering in gravy) is known as “smothering” and can be used for other tough cuts of meat, such as swiss steak. Smothered chicken is still consumed today, though with the exception of people who raise their own chickens, or who seek out stewing hens, it is primarily made using commercial broiler chickens.

The derivative phrases “country fried” and “chicken fried” often refer to other foods prepared in the manner of fried chicken. Usually, this means a boneless, tenderized piece of meat that has been floured or battered and cooked in any of the methods described above or simply chicken which is cooked outdoors. Chicken fried steak and “country fried” boneless chicken breast are two common examples.

Throughout the world, different seasoning and spices are used to augment the flavor of fried chicken. Because of the versatility of fried chicken, it is not uncommon to flavor the chicken’s crisp exterior with a variety of spices ranging from spicy to savory. Depending on regional market ubiquity, local spice variations may be labeled as distinct from traditional Southern U.S. flavors, or may appear on menus without notation. With access to chickens suitable for frying broadening on a global scale with the advent of industrialized poultry farming, many localities have added their own mark on fried chicken, tweaking recipes to suit local preferences.

North America

* Buffalo wings: Named for their place of origin, Buffalo, New York, this is one of the few kinds of fried chicken that is not traditionally battered before frying.

*Buffalo strips, fingers, crisp wings and boneless wings: using the same cayenne-pepper sauce as Buffalo Wings, these chicken products are battered before frying. See also: chicken fingers and chicken nuggets.

*Chicken fingers: also known as chicken tenders or chicken strips, this is one of the most common forms of fried chicken, generally

Nashville-style hot chicken with traditional accompaniments

Nashville-style hot chicken with traditional accompaniments

pieces of chicken breast (sometimes with rib meat) cut into long strips, breaded or battered dipped, and deep fried.

*Chicken fries: chicken nuggets in the shape of French fries, popularized by the fast-food chains Burger King and KFC. These may also be referred to as chicken sticks.

*Chicken nuggets: an industrially reconstituted boneless chicken product invented by Cornell poultry science professor Robert C. Baker in the 1950s.

*Popcorn chicken: occasionally known as chicken bites or other similar terms, small morsels of boneless chicken, battered and fried, resulting in little nuggets that resemble popcorn.

*Chicken patties: breaded, fried patties of chicken meat used in sandwiches.

*Country Fried Chicken: chicken meat that has been coated with flour or breaded,fried and served topped with country cream gravy. Related tangentially to Chicken fried steak.

*Chicken and waffles, a combination platter of foods traditionally served at breakfast and dinner in one meal, common to soul food restaurants in the American South and beyond.

*Hot chicken: common in the Nashville, Tennessee area, a pan-fried variant of fried chicken coated with lard and cayenne pepper paste.

Asia

*Crispy fried chicken: a dish from the regional Cantonese cuisine of China.

*Chicken karaage- a Japanese marinated and fried method of preparing fried chicken.

Tori no Karaage, Japanese fried chicken

*Chicken katsu     a Japanese panko-breaded, deep fried chicken cutlet, adapted from tonkatsu, a pork chop variant.

* Korean fried chicken: fried chicken pieces flavored with Korean ganjang sauce with garlic.

*Buldak: fried chicken with Korean seasonings like gochujang.

*Prawn paste chicken or “shrimp paste chicken”: popular in Hong Kong-style restaurants in Singapore and Malaysia. Incorporates puréed shrimp and ginger juice into its breading mixture.

*Sweet and sour chicken: deep-fried balls of chicken breast in batter.

*Toriten: Japanese tempura style fried chicken

*Chicken Inasal: a popular Filipino fried and grilled chicken in the Philippines.

Australasia

*Chicken chipees: chicken meat chopped and shaped into chips coated with potato crumbs.

Surf and Turf Bison Style!

March 1, 2012 at 5:51 PM | Posted in baking, bison, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, low calorie, low carb, potatoes, seafood, shrimp | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Surf & Turf – Bison Sirloin & Sauteed Mushrooms w/ Shrimp, Baked Potato, and Whole Wheat Bread

There are meals and then there is this. I had a Bison Sirloin Steak (Turf), Gorton’s Homestyle Shrimp (Surf), Baked Potato, and Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. I seasoned the Bison with McCormick Grinder Steakhouse Seasoning and pan fried it in Extra Virgin Olive Oil about 4 minutes per side, to medium rare. Topped it with Sauteed Baby Bella Mushrooms that I seasoned with Ground Smoked Cumin, Parsley, and Sea Salt. Sauteed in Extra Virgin Olive Oil and a pat of I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter.

The Turf part of the dinner I used Gorton’s Home Style Shrimp, a 1/2 serving. Easily made baked at 425 degrees for 16 minutes. I had posted before this is the best boxed Shrimp around. I also had a baked Potato that I topped with I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter, a dab of Reduced Fat Sour Cream, McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

Bison Sirloin & Sauteed Mushrooms w/ Grilled Asparagus, Grilled Potatoes, and..

February 14, 2012 at 6:53 PM | Posted in bison, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, low calorie, low carb, vegetables | Leave a comment
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  • Today’s Menu: Bison Sirloin & Sautéed Mushrooms w/ Grilled Asparagus, Grilled Potatoes with Cheese and Herb Seasoning, and Whole Grain Bread

    I had a petite Bison Sirloin Steak & Sautéed Mushrooms for dinner tonight. I seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Steak House Seasoning and lightly pan fried it on medium low heat until medium rare. I topped it with some Baby Bella Sautéed Mushrooms that I seasoned with Sea Salt, Ground Smoked Cumin, Ground Thyme, and Parsley.

    For sides I had Grilled Asparagus, Grilled Potatoes with Cheese and Herb Seasoning, and Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. For dessert later a Pillsbury Apple Turnover topped with a scoop of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream.

Bison Sirloin & Sauteed Mushrooms w/ Cheesy Hash Browns, Green Beans, and…

January 23, 2012 at 5:56 PM | Posted in bison, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, hash browns, Idahoan Potato Products, low calorie, low carb | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Bison Sirloin & Sautéed Mushrooms w/ Cheesy Hash Browns, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread

I had a petite Bison Sirloin Steak & Sautéed Mushrooms for dinner tonight. I love Bison I personally think that it’s the best tasting and most tender meat there is. I seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Steak House Seasoning and lightly pan fried it on medium low heat until medium rare. I topped it with some Baby Bella Sautéed Mushrooms that I seasoned with Sea Salt, Ground Smoked Cumin, Ground Thyme, and Parsley.

 

For sides I had baked Idahoan Farm House Fix’ns Cheesy Hash Browns, Green Beans, and Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. The Hash Browns are easy to fix, just mix the box ingredients and add 2% Milk, water, and Butter then bake. Easy and delicious. For dessert/snack later some Tostio’s Artisan Corn Chips along with some Kroger Organic Black Bean & Corn Salsa.

Bison Sirloin & Sauteed Mushrooms w/ Green Beans & Carrots and…

December 22, 2011 at 5:59 PM | Posted in bison, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, low calorie, low carb, vegetables | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Bison Sirloin & Sauteed Mushrooms w/ Green Beans & Carrots and Harvest Grain Bread

Back to the Bison for dinner tonight. I had a Bison Sirloin that I seasoned with McCormick Grinder Steakhouse Seasoning. I pan fried it in a a 1/2 a tablespoon of Extra Virgin Olive Oil about 4 minutes per side. Topped it with Sauteed Mushrooms that were seasoned with Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper, Smoked Ground Cumin, and Parsly. Then lightly sauteed in Extra Virgin Olive oil and a pat of I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter.

For sides I had Kroger Bakery Harvest Grain Bread and the leftover Pero Family Farms Green Beans & Carrots I had the other night. The Green Beans & Carrots was something I picked up earlier in the week at Meijer. Easy to fix, microwave in the bag or boil in 3 cups of water for 7 minutes which is what I did. They came out crisp and delicious. For dessert later a slice of Pillsbury Nut Quick Bread with a scoop of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream.

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