Diabetic Dish of the Week – Roasted Salmon with Strawberry-Orange Salsa

March 24, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | 2 Comments
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is a Roasted Salmon with Strawberry-Orange Salsa. To make this week’s dish you’ll be needing Salmon Fillets, Spices, Orange, Strawberries, Poblano Pepper, Cilantro, and Fresh Ginger. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Roasted Salmon with Strawberry-Orange Salsa
Ginger and peppers give this seafood dish some kick!

Ingredients
4 salmon fillets (about 1/4 pound each), skin removed
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 medium orange
1 cup diced strawberries
1/4 cup finely chopped poblano pepper* or green bell pepper
2 tablespoons finely chopped cilantro
1/2 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

Directions
Yield:
4 servings (1 piece salmon and 1/3 cup salsa)

Serving size:
3 ounces salmon (cooked weight) with 1/3 cup salsa

Preheat oven to 400°F.

Line baking sheet with foil; spray with nonstick cooking spray. Place salmon on prepared pan; sprinkle with cumin, thyme, salt, and pepper. Bake 12 to 14 minutes or until salmon begins to flake when tested with fork.

Meanwhile, grate orange peel to measure 1/2 teaspoon; place in medium bowl. Peel and section orange; coarsely chop orange sections. Add orange sections, strawberries, pepper, cilantro, and ginger to bowl; mix well. Serve salmon with salsa.

*Poblano peppers can sting and irritate the skin, so wear rubber gloves when handling peppers and do not touch your eyes.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 241 calories, Carbohydrates: 8 g, Protein: 24 g, Fat: 12 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Cholesterol: 66 mg, Sodium: 214 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/roasted-salmon-with-strawberry-orange-salsa/

 

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Lemon Orange Walnut Bread and Pineapple Zucchini Bread

August 9, 2013 at 9:17 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly | Leave a comment
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A couple of Diabetic Friendly Breads to pass along, a Lemon Orange Walnut Bread and Pineapple Zucchini Bread. Instead of Sugar one is made with Splenda and the other with Equal. Thanks goes out to Lynn for passing them along!

 
Lemon Orange Walnut Bread

Ingredients:

1 cup Whole Wheat Flour
1 cup All-Purpose Flour
1 teaspoon Baking Powder
1/2 teaspoon Baking Soda
2/3 cup 2% Low-Fat Milk
2 tablespoons Lemon Juice
1 1/2 teaspoons freshly grated Lemon peel
1 1/2 teaspoons freshly grated Orange peel
2 Large Eggs or 1/2 Cup Egg Beater‘s
3/4 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1/2 cup Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter, melted
2 teaspoons Vanilla Extract
3/4 cup chopped Walnuts

 
Directions:

*Preheat oven to 350°F (175°F). Lightly spray an 8 1/2 x4 1/2 x2 1/2-inch loaf pan with vegetable cooking spray.
* Combine both flours, baking powder, and baking soda. Set aside.
*Combine milk, lemon juice, lemon and orange peel. Set aside.
* Beat eggs and Splenda Granulated Sweetener on high-speed with an electric mixer for 5 minutes. Reduce speed to medium; gradually add melted butter and vanilla, beating until blended, about 1 minute.
* Add flour mixture alternately with milk mixture; beginning and ending with flour mixture. Beat at low-speed until blended after each addition. Stir in nuts. Spoon batter into prepared loaf pan.
* Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until a long wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pan on a wire rack 10 minutes; remove from pan and cool completely.
* Makes 12 servings. Serving Size: 1 (1/2 inch) slice.

 

 
Pineapple Zucchini Bread
Lower-sugar pineapple zucchini bread.
Ingredients:

1 cup Vegetable Oil or Extra Virgin Olive Oil
3 Large Eggs or 3/4 Cup Egg Beater’s
3 1/2 teaspoons Equal for Recipes or 12 packets Equal sweetener or 1/2 cups Equal Spoonful
1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
2 cups shredded Zucchini
1 (8 1/2-ounce) can unsweetened Crushed Pineapple in juice, drained
3 cups All-Purpose Flour
1 1/2 teaspoons Ground Cinnamon
1 teaspoon Baking Soda
1 teaspoon Ground Nutmeg
3/4 teaspoon Sea Salt
1 cup raisins
1/2 cup chopped Walnuts

 
Directions:

* Mix oil, eggs, Equal and vanilla in large bowl; stir in zucchini and pineapple.
* Combine flour, cinnamon, baking soda, nutmeg and salt in medium bowl; stir into oil mixture. Stir in raisins and walnuts, if desired.
* Spread batter evenly in 2 greased and floured 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 2 1/2-inch loaf pans.
* Bake in preheated 350°F (175°C) oven until breads are golden and toothpick inserted in centers comes out clean, 50 to 60 minutes. Cool in pans on wire racks 10 minutes; remove from pans and cool completely on wire rack.
* Makes 2 loaves.

Fruit of the Week – Kumquat

October 24, 2011 at 10:51 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, fruits, low calorie, low carb | Leave a comment
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Kumquat

Cumquats or kumquats are a group of small fruit-bearing trees in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, either forming the genus Fortunella, or placed within Citrus sensu lato. The edible fruit closely resembles that of the orange (Citrus sinensis), but it is much smaller and ovular, being approximately the size and shape of an olive.

Kumquat fruit cross-section

They are slow-growing evergreen shrubs or short trees, from 8 to 15 ft tall, with sparse branches, sometimes bearing small thorns. The leaves are dark glossy green, and the flowers white, similar to other citrus flowers, borne singly or clustered in the leaf-axils. The kumquat tree produces 30 to 50 fruit each year.[dubious – discuss] The tree can be hydrophytic, with the fruit often found floating on water near shore during the ripe season.

The plant is native to south Asia and the Asia-Pacific. The earliest historical reference to kumquats appears in literature of China in the 12th century. They have long been cultivated in Japan, Taiwan, the Philippines and southeast Asia. They were introduced to Europe in 1846 by Robert Fortune, collector for the London Horticultural Society, and shortly thereafter into North America.

The Round Kumquat (also Marumi Kumquat or Morgani Kumquat) is an evergreen tree, producing edible golden-yellow colored fruit. The fruit is small and usually round but can be oval shaped. The peel has a sweet flavor but the fruit has a sour center. The fruit can be eaten cooked but is mainly used to make marmalade and jelly. It is grown as an ornamental plant and can be used in bonsai. This plant symbolizes good luck in China and other Asian countries, where it is sometimes given as a gift during the Lunar New Year. It’s more commonly cultivated than most other kumquats as it is cold tolerant. It can be kept as a houseplant.

When the kumquats are divided into multiple species the name Fortunella japonica (Citrus japonica) is retained by this group.

Fortunella margarita, also known as the oval kumquat or the Nagami kumquat, is a close relative to Citrus species. It is a small evergreen tree, that can reach more than 12 ft  high and 9 ft  large. It is native to southeastern Asia, and more precisely to China. The oval kumquat has very fragrant citrus-like white flowers, and small edible oval orange fruits. The oval kumquat is an ornamental little tree, with showy foliage, flowers and fruits. It is also fairly frost-hardy, and will withstand negative temperatures such as 14 °F (-10 °C), and even a little lower for very brief periods. It can be grown in USDA hardiness zones 9 and warmer, but can also be tried in sheltered places, in USDA hardiness zone 8. Unlike most citrus species, the oval kumquat has a shorter growth period, and goes into dormancy fairly earlier in autumn. This partly explains its better frost hardiness.

The evergreen leaves of the oval kumquat are deep-green and relatively small. They can reach up to 3 in  long and 1.5 in  wide. The white flowers of the oval kumquat are similar to the citrus flowers. They are strongly perfumed, and they appear relatively late in the growing season, generally late spring.

The oval kumquat is a fruit that looks like any citrus fruit, with an orange rind. The fruits are oblong, up to 2 in (5 cm) long. Unlike the common citrus, which have a rind which is inedible raw, oval kumquats have an edible sweet rind. The flesh, however, is not as

sweet as the rind, and the juice is quite acidic and sour, with a lemon-like flavor. This fruit is generally eaten fresh, with its rind. It can also be processed into preserves, jams, and other products.

The Jiangsu Kumquat or Fukushu Kumquat bears edible fruit that can be eaten raw. The fruit can be made into jelly and marmalade. The fruit can be round or bell shaped, it’s bright orange when fully ripe. It may also be distinguished from other kumquats by its round leaves that make this species unique within the genus. It is grown for its edible fruit and as an ornamental plant. It cannot withstand frost.

When the kumquats are divided into multiple species the name Fortunella obovata (Citrus obovata) is used for this group.

Kumquats are cultivated in China, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, Southeast Asia, Japan, the Middle East, Europe (notably Corfu, Greece), southern Pakistan, and the southern United States (notably Florida, Louisiana, Alabama) and California.

They are much hardier than other citrus plants such as oranges. The ‘Nagami’ kumquat requires a hot summer, ranging from 77 ° to 100 °F, but can withstand frost down to about −10 °C (14 °F) without injury. They grow in the tea hills of Hunan, China, where the climate is too cold for other citrus fruits, even the Mikan (also known as th

Malayan Kumquat foliage and fruit

e Satsuma) orange. The trees differ also from other citrus species in that they enter into a period of winter dormancy so profound that they will remain in it through several weeks of subsequent warm weather without putting out new shoots or blossoms. Despite their ability to survive low temperatures, kumquat trees grow better and produce larger and sweeter fruits in warmer regions.

Kumquats are often eaten raw. As the rind is sweet and the juicy centre is sour, the raw fruit is usually consumed either whole—to savour the contrast—or only the rind is eaten. The fruit is considered ripe when it reaches a yellowish-orange stage and has just shed the last tint of green.

Culinary uses include candying and kumquat preserves, marmalade, and jelly. Kumquats can also be sliced and added to salads. In recent years kumquats have gained popularity as a garnish for cocktail beverages, including the martini as a replacement for the more familiar olive. A kumquat liqueur mixes the fruit with vodka or other clear spirit. Kumquats are also being used by chefs to create a niche for their desserts and are common in European countries.
Potted kumquat trees at a kumquat liqueur distillery in Corfu.

The Cantonese often preserve kumquats in salt or sugar. A batch of the fruit is buried in dry salt inside a glass jar. Over time, all the juice from the fruit is diffused into the salt. The fruit in the jar becomes shrunken, wrinkled, and dark brown in colour, and the salt combines with the juice to become a dark brown brine. A few salted kumquats with a few teaspoons of the brine/juice may be mixed with hot water to make a remedy for sore throats. A jar of such preserved kumquats can last several years and still keep its taste

In the Philippines and Taiwan, kumquats are a popular addition to green tea and black tea, either hot or iced.

In Vietnam, kumquat bonsai trees (round kumquat plant) are used as a decoration for the Tết (Lunar New Year) holiday. Kumquat fruits are also boiled or dried to make a candied snack called mứt quất.

Variants of the kumquat are grown specially in India.

Fruit of the Week – Orange

October 3, 2011 at 10:37 AM | Posted in Food, fruits, low calorie, low carb | 4 Comments
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An orange is a type of citrus fruit which people often eat. Oranges are a very good source of vitamins, especially vitamin C.. Orange juice is an important part of many people’s breakfast. The “sweet orange”, which is the kind that are most often eaten today, grew first in Asia but now grows in many parts of the world.

Oranges are round orange-coloured fruit that grow on a tree which can reach 10 meters high. Orange trees have dark green shiny leaves and small white flowers with five petals. The flowers smell very sweet which attracts many bees.

An orange has a tough shiny orange skin. Inside, the fruit is divided into “segments”, which have thin tough skins that hold together many little sections with juice inside. There are usually ten segments in an orange, but sometimes there are more. Inside each segment of most types of orange there are seeds called “pips”. Orange trees can be grown from pips, but some types of orange trees can only be grown from “cuttings” (a piece cut off a tree and made to grow roots). The segments and the skin are separated by white stringy stuff called “pith”. In most types of oranges, the skin can be peeled off the pith, and the segments can be pulled apart with the fingers to be eaten. In some oranges it is hard to take the skin off. With mandarin oranges, the skin, pith and segments can all be pulled apart very easily. Orange skin is often called “orange peel”.

Oranges are an important food source in many parts of the world for several reasons. They are a commonly available source of vitamin C. The juice is a refreshing drink. They last longer than many other fruits when they are stored. They are easy to transport because each orange comes in its own tough skin which acts as a container. They can be piled into heaps or carried in bags, lunchboxes and shipping containers without being easily damaged.

The color orange takes its name from the fruit. The word “orange” is unusual because it is one of only a few English words that does not rhyme with anything.

Sweet orange trees were brought to Italy, Spain and Portugal from India in the fifteenth century (1400s). Before that time only sour oranges were grown in Italy. From Europe, orange trees were taken to the United States, South America, Africa and Australia, which all grow oranges for sale.

There are several different types of sweet orange. One of the most common types is called the “Valencia” orange, which comes from Spain and is also grown in Africa and Australia. It is one of the most important “commercial” oranges. (This means that it is grown for sale in shops.)

One type of sweet orange is called the “blood orange” or “sanguine orange” (sanguine means blood red). These oranges often have red marks on the skin, and some parts of the inside look as if they have blood in them. Some blood oranges make juice that is ruby red.

In the 1850s, in Brazil, there was a tree growing in a monastery garden that made very strange fruit. Inside each orange skin there was a large orange with no seeds. At the bottom of the orange was a baby orange, which was really the bigger orange’s twin. The little orange made a strange bump at the bottom of the orange skin, that looked just like a human “belly-button”. These oranges were named “Navel Oranges”. They tasted very sweet, they had no seeds and they peeled quite easily. This made them a very good orange to grow “commercially”. But they could not grow from seed. They could only grow from cuttings. Nowadays, thousands of these orange trees have been planted from cuttings. “Navel Oranges” are grown in California and exported to many countries of the world. Every navel orange in the world has the same genetic make up as the oranges on that tree in the monastery in Brazil.

Mandarins, small flattened oranges with skins that come off easily, are believed to have come from China. Now there are several varieties. These include “tangerines” which are redder than most mandarins, and “clementines” which are large, smooth and plump. Mandarins of all sorts are very useful lunchbox fruit, because they are easy to peel and eat, but do not get squashed easily.

Nowadays, many people of the world eat an orange or drink orange juice every day, because oranges are one of the best and cheapest sources of Vitamin C. Human bodies, unlike many other animals, do not manufacture Vitamin C, so a human needs vitamin C in their diet regularly. (Vitamin C helps the body to grow, to heal wounds and fight infection.) Oranges are also a very good source of dietary fiber. But they do not contain high amounts of minerals. If a person eats an orange and a banana together, then they have had a very nourishing snack that supplies both vitamins and minerals.

Other citrus species known as oranges include:

The bitter orange, Citrus aurantium, also known as Seville orange, sour orange (especially when used as rootstock for a sweet orange tree), bigarade orange, and marmalade orange.
The bergamot orange, Citrus bergamia Risso, which is grown primarily in Italy and used primarily for the peel, which flavors Earl Grey tea.
The mandarin orange Citrus reticulata, which itself has an enormous number of cultivars (most notably the satsuma (C. unshiu), tangerine (Citrus × tangerina) and clementine (C. clementina). In some cultivars the mandarin resembles the sweet orange and is difficult to distinguish from it, but it is generally smaller and/or oblate rather than round in shape, easier to peel, and less acid.
The trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) is sometimes included in the genus and classified as an orange (Citrus trifoliata). It is often used as rootstock for sweet orange trees, especially as a hybrid with other Citrus cultivars. The trifoliate orange is a thorny shrub or small tree grown primarily for its foliage and flowers, or as a barrier hedge; however, it bears a downy fruit resembling a small citrus fruit, from which marmalade is sometimes made. It is native to northern China and Korea, and is also known as “hardy orange” (because it can withstand sub-freezing temperatures) or “Chinese bitter orange”.

Canopy-shaking mechanical harvesters are increasingly being used in Florida to harvest process oranges. Current canopy shaker machines use a series of six- to seven-foot long tines to shake the tree canopy at a relatively constant shaking stroke and frequency.

After harvesting, oranges have a shelf life of about one week at room temperature and one month refrigerated. In either case, they are optimally stored loosely in an open or perforated plastic bag. Oranges produce odors that are absorbed by meat, eggs and dairy products.

Fruit of the Week – Mandarin Orange

September 26, 2011 at 10:43 AM | Posted in baking, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, fruits | 4 Comments
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The Mandarin orange, also known as the mandarin or mandarine (both lower-case), is a small citrus tree (Citrus reticulata) with fruit resembling other oranges. Mandarin oranges are usually eaten plain or in fruit salads. Specifically reddish-orange mandarin cultivars can be marketed as tangerines, but this is not a botanical classification.

Mandarin orange

The tree is more drought-tolerant than the fruit. The mandarin is tender, and is damaged easily by cold. It can be grown in tropical and subtropical areas

The mandarin orange is but one variety of the orange family. The mandarin has many names, some of which actually refer to crosses between the mandarin and another citrus fruit.

Satsuma, a seedless variety, of which there are over 200 cultivars, such as Owari and mikan; the source of most canned mandarins, and popular as a fresh fruit due to its ease of consumption
Owari, a well-known Satsuma cultivar which ripens during the late fall season
Clementine, sometimes known as a “Christmas orange”, as its peak season is December; becoming the most important commercial Mandarin orange form, have displaced mikans in many markets
Tangerine
Tangor, also called the temple orange, a cross between the Mandarin orange and the common sweet orange; its thick rind is easy to peel and its bright orange pulp is sour-sweet and full-flavored

The mandarin is easily peeled with the fingers, starting at the thick rind covering the depression at the top of the fruit, and can be easily split into even segments without squirting juice. This makes it convenient to eat, as utensils are not required to peel or cut the fruit.

Canned mandarin segments are peeled to remove the white pith prior to canning; otherwise, they turn bitter. Segments are peeled using a chemical process. First, the segments are scalded in hot water to loosen the skin; then they are bathed in a lye solution which digests the albedo and membranes. Finally, the segments undergo several rinses in plain water.

Canned and peeled mandarin orange segments

During Chinese New Year, Mandarin oranges and tangerines are considered traditional symbols of abundance and good fortune. During the two-week celebration, they are frequently displayed as decoration and presented as gifts to friends, relatives, and business associates.

Citrus fruits are usually self-fertile (needing only a bee to move pollen within the same flower) or parthenocarpic (not needing pollination and therefore seedless, such as the satsuma).

Blossoms from the Dancy cultivar are one exception. They are self-sterile, and therefore must have a pollenizer variety to supply pollen, and a high bee population to make a good crop. The fruit is oblate.

In traditional Chinese medicine, the dried peel of the fruit is used in the regulation of ch’i, and also used to treat abdominal distension, to enhance digestion, and to reduce phlegm. Mandarins have also been used in ayurveda (traditional medicine of India).

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