One of America’s Favorite Christmas Treats – Candy Cane

December 4, 2017 at 6:23 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A traditional candy cane

A candy cane is a cane-shaped stick candy often associated with Christmastide, as well as Saint Nicholas Day. It is traditionally white with red stripes and flavored with peppermint, but may also be a variety of other flavors and colors.

 

 

According to folklore, in 1670, in Cologne, Germany, the choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral, wishing to remedy the noise caused by children in his church during the Living Crèche tradition of Christmas Eve, asked a local candy maker for some “sugar sticks” for them. In order to justify the practice of giving candy to children during worship services, he asked the candy maker to add a crook to the top of each stick, which would help children remember the shepherds who visited the infant Jesus. In addition, he used the white color of the converted sticks to teach children about the Christian belief in the sinless life of Jesus. From Germany, candy canes spread to other parts of Europe, where they were handed out during plays reenacting the Nativity. As such, according to this legend, the candy cane became associated with Christmastide.

The earliest verifiable reference to stick candy is a record of the 1837 Exhibition of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, where confections were judged competitively. A recipe for straight peppermint candy sticks, white with colored stripes, was published in 1844. The “candy cane” is found in literature in 1866, though no description of color or flavor was provided. Its earliest known association with Christmas was in 1874, and by 1882 canes were being hung on Christmas trees.

 

 

 

Candy cane

As with other forms of stick candy, the earliest canes were manufactured by hand. Chicago confectioners the Bunte Brothers filed one of the earliest patents for candy cane making machines in the early 1920s. In 1919 in Albany, Georgia, Robert McCormack began making candy canes for local children and by the middle of the century, his company (originally the Famous Candy Company, then the Mills-McCormack Candy Company, and later Bobs Candies) had become one of the world’s leading candy cane producers. Candy cane manufacturing initially required a fair bit of labor that limited production quantities; the canes had to be bent manually as they came off the assembly line to create their curved shape and breakage often ran over 20 percent. McCormack’s brother-in-law, Gregory Harding Keller, was a seminary student in Rome who spent his summers working in the candy factory back home. In 1957, Keller, as an ordained Roman Catholic priest of the Diocese of Little Rock, patented his invention, the Keller Machine, which automated the process of twisting soft candy into spiral striping and cutting it into precise lengths as candy canes.

 

Advertisements

One of America’s Favorite Christmas Treats – Rice Krispie Treats

December 21, 2014 at 6:30 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

One of America’s Favorite Christmas Treats – Rice Krispie Treats

 

Rice Krispies Treats
Rice Krispies Treats (also called Rice Krispies squares, bars, buns,cakes or Marshmallow Squares) are a sweet dessert or snack made from Rice Krispies or other crisp rice cereal, melted butter or margarine, and either melted marshmallows or marshmallow creme, the latter which allows the treat to be suitable for vegetarians. While they can be made at home, they can also be found available for purchase in a box, the latter of which debuted in 1995. Rice Krispies Treats can also be made either very thin, or thick and gooey, depending on the ratio of marshmallows to cereal.

 

 

Rice Krispies Treats were invented in 1939 by Malitta Jensen and Mildred Day at the Kellogg Company home economics department as a fund raiser for Camp Fire Girls.

Sometimes marshmallows and/or cereal that is seasonal is used to make these treats holiday-specific. There are many other variations to the treat – adding caramel instead of marshmallows, adding condensed milk to the mixture before adding the Rice Krispies, using corn syrup and peanut butter, adding chocolate chips, nuts, flavoring agents, M&M’s or other candy. Chocolate crackles are a similar item. Kellogg’s produces plain and chocolate-based treats under the names of “Rice Krispies Treats” (in the U.S. and Mexico), “Squares” (in Canada and the U.K.) and “LCMs” (in Australia and New Zealand). Alternative forms of Rice Krispies Treats can actually made from other types of cereal as well to still create a deliciously sweet dessert. Other cereals such as Lucky Charms, Froot Loops, and Cinnamon Toast Crunch are just a few options to vary from Rice Krispies, yet stick with the original recipe of adding marshmallows, butter, and the other normal ingredients.

 

 

 

“Rice Krispies Treats” is a name that is trademarked by Kellogg’s; however, other manufacturers offer similar products under variant names such as “Crisped Rice Treats” or “Marshmallow Treats”.

Kellogg’s company came out with a cereal based on this treat. Kellogg’s Rice Krispies Treats cereal briefly surged in popularity, and received a 6 out of 7 rating on popular breakfast critic website Mr. Breakfast. Recently this cereal has become harder to find, though Kellogg’s website contains resources that can help with finding their rarer cereals.

 
* Below is a recipe of a variation of the normal Rice Krispie Treats, Rice Krispie Wreaths.
Rice Krispie Wreaths

Ingredients needed:
3 T. butter
1 package (10 oz.) marshmallows
6 C. Rice Krispies
1 t. green food coloring
½ t. of mint extract
1 Twizzlers Cherry Pull-n-Peel
1 bottle of cinnamon candies like Red Hots

Directions:

Melt the butter in a large stove-top pan and then adds marshmallows, stirring until completely melted. Add the green food coloring. Stir in Rice Krispies cereal. Mix together the Rice Krispies and marshmallow concoction and begin forming their wreaths, which will be about the size of a medium sand dollar. After the wreaths are formed into a circle complete with a hole in the middle, they should be placed on wax paper to cool and maintain their new shape. While cooling on the wax paper, everyone picks a few wreaths and decorates them with ribbons of pull-n-peel Twizzlers or holly berries made from cinnamon dots.

One of America’s Favorite Christmas Treats – Pecan Pie

December 18, 2014 at 6:27 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Pecan Pie

Pecan Pie

Another recipe that always reminds me of my Grandmother. Among the many things she would make for Christmas, she would always bake a couple Pecan Pies!

 

 
Pecan pie is a pie made primarily with corn syrup and pecan nuts. Variations may include white or brown sugar, sugar syrup, molasses, maple syrup, or honey. It is popularly served at holiday meals and is also considered a specialty of Southern U.S. cuisine. Most pecan pie recipes include salt and vanilla as flavorings. Chocolate and bourbon whiskey are other popular additions to the recipe. Pecan pie is often served with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

 

 

A slice of pecan pie.

A slice of pecan pie.

Claims have been made of the dish existing in the early 1800s in Alabama, but this does not appear to be backed up by recipes or literature. Attempts to trace the dish’s origin have not found any recipes dated earlier than 1886, and well-known cookbooks such as Fannie Farmer and The Joy of Cooking did not include this dessert before 1940. The earliest recorded recipes produce a boiled custard with pecans added, which is then baked in a pie crust.

Some have stated that the French invented pecan pie soon after settling in New Orleans, after being introduced to the pecan nut by Native Americans. Pecan pie may be a variant of chess pie, which is made with a similar butter-sugar-egg custard.

The makers of Karo syrup significantly contributed to popularizing the dish and many of the recipes for variants (caramel, cinnamon, Irish creme, peanut butter, etc.) of the classic pie. The company has claimed that the dish was a 1930s “discovery” of a “new use for corn syrup” by a corporate sales executive’s wife.

 

One of America’s Favorite Christmas Treats – Fruit Cake (or maybe not so favorite!)

December 13, 2014 at 1:30 PM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Fruit cake

Fruit cake

Fruit cake (or fruitcake) is a cake made with chopped candied fruit and/or dried fruit, nuts, and spices, and (optionally) soaked in spirits. A cake that simply has fruit in it as an ingredient can also be colloquially called a fruit cake. In the United Kingdom, certain rich versions may be iced and decorated.

 

Fruit cakes are often served in celebration of weddings and Christmas. Given their rich nature, fruit cake is most often consumed on its own, as opposed to with condiments (such as butter or cream).

 

 

 

The earliest recipe from ancient Rome lists pomegranate seeds, pine nuts, and raisins that were mixed into barley mash. In the Middle Ages, honey, spices, and preserved fruits were added.

Fruit cakes soon proliferated all over Europe. Recipes varied greatly in different countries throughout the ages, depending on the available ingredients as well as (in some instances) church regulations forbidding the use of butter, regarding the observance of fast. Pope Innocent VIII (1432–1492) finally granted the use of butter, in a written permission known as the ‘Butter Letter’ or Butterbrief in 1490, giving permission to Saxony to use milk and butter in the North German Stollen fruit cakes.

Starting in the 16th century, sugar from the American Colonies (and the discovery that high concentrations of sugar could preserve fruits) created an excess of candied fruit, thus making fruit cakes more affordable and popular.

 

 

 

Typical American fruit cakes are rich in fruit and nuts.

Traditional American fruit cake with fruits and nuts.

Traditional American fruit cake with fruits and nuts.

Mail-order fruit cakes in America began in 1913. Some well-known American bakers of fruit cake include Collin Street Bakery in Corsicana, Texas, and The Claxton Bakery in Claxton, Georgia. Both Collin Street and Claxton are Southern companies with access to cheap nuts, for which the expression “nutty as a fruitcake” was derived in 1935. Commercial fruit cakes are often sold from catalogs by charities as a fund raiser.

Most American mass-produced fruit cakes are alcohol-free, but traditional recipes are saturated with liqueurs or brandy and covered in powdered sugar, both of which prevent mold. Brandy (or wine) soaked linens can be used to store the fruit cakes, and some people feel that fruit cakes improve with age.

In the United States, the fruit cake has been a ridiculed dessert. Some attribute the beginning of this trend with The Tonight Show host Johnny Carson. He would joke that there really is only one fruitcake in the world, passed from family to family. After Carson’s death, the tradition continued with “The Fruitcake Lady” (Marie Rudisill), who made appearances on the show and offered her “fruitcake” opinions. In fact, the fruitcake had been a butt of jokes on television programs such as Father Knows Best and The Donna Reed Show years before The Tonight Show debuted and appears to have first become a vilified confection in the early 20th century, as evidenced by Warner Brothers cartoons.

Since 1995, Manitou Springs, Colorado, has hosted the Great Fruitcake Toss on the first Saturday of every January. “We encourage the use of recycled fruitcakes,” says Leslie Lewis of the Manitou Springs Chamber of Commerce. The all-time Great Fruitcake Toss record is 1,420 feet, set in January 2007 by a group of eight Boeing engineers who built the “Omega 380,” a mock artillery piece fueled by compressed air pumped by an exercise bike.

 

 

 

 

If a fruit cake contains alcohol, it could remain edible for many years. For example, a fruit cake baked in 1878 is kept as an heirloom by a family (Morgan L. Ford) in Tecumseh, Michigan. In 2003 it was sampled by Jay Leno on The Tonight Show. Wrapping the cake in alcohol-soaked linen before storing is one method of lengthening its shelf life.

 

One of America’s Favorite Christmas Treats – Buckeyes

December 11, 2014 at 10:47 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Buckeye candy

Buckeye candy

Buckeye candy (also referred to simply as buckeyes) is a confection made from a peanut butter fudge partially dipped in chocolate to leave a circle of peanut butter visible. Buckeyes are similar to peanut butter balls (or peanut-butter-filled chocolate balls), which are completely covered in chocolate.

 

Named for their resemblance to the nut of the Ohio buckeye tree, the state tree of Ohio, this candy is particularly popular in Ohio and neighboring states.

 

It is common for Ohioans to make buckeyes at home, but they are also available in mail-order catalogs and candy shops.

 

 

 

 
The Old Family Buckeye Recipe (Mom’s Recipe)buckeyes-001
Ingredients:

Recipe will make about 60 balls

1 – Stick Butter, Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter
1 – Box (1 LB) Confectioner Sugar
2 – Cups Jiff Smooth Peanut Butter
3 – Cups Rice Krispies
1 – 12 oz. Package Chocolate Chips
1 – Small Bar Hershey’s Milk Chocolate
1/2 Bar Paraffin Wax
Directions:

* In a large bowl mix Butter, Sugar, Peanut Butter, and Rice Krispies (With Hands)
* Chill the mixture for at least 2 hours.
* Then take the mixture and roll into individual balls. The size can vary no set size.
* Melt all the Chocolate and Paraffin Wax in a double broiler or in a sauce pan on low heat stirring until smooth.
* With one or two forks dip each of the balls into the Chocolate/Wax. Drain excess off the balls and place on a sheet pan covered with wax paper and refrigerate for several hours until Chocolate has hardened into a shell covering the balls.
* Now enjoy them!

One of America’s Favorite Christmas Treats – Egg Nog

December 10, 2014 at 1:29 PM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,
Eggnog with nutmeg

Eggnog with nutmeg

Eggnog, or egg nog (About this sound pronunciation (help·info)), is a sweetened dairy-based beverage traditionally made with milk and/or cream, sugar, and whipped eggs (which gives it a frothy texture). Spirits such as brandy, rum or bourbon are often added. The finished serving is often garnished with a sprinkling of ground cinnamon or nutmeg.

 

 

 

It was also known as the egg milk punch.

Eggnog is traditionally consumed throughout Canada and the United States around Thanksgiving and Christmas. Eggnog may be added as a flavoring to food or drinks such as coffee and tea. Eggnog as a custard can also be used as an ice cream base.

 

 

 
The origins, etymology, and the ingredients used to make the original eggnog drink are debated. Eggnog may have originated in East Anglia, England; or it may have simply developed from posset, a medieval European beverage made with hot milk. The “nog” part of its name may stem from the word noggin, a Middle English term for a small, carved wooden mug used to serve alcohol. However, the British drink was also called an Egg Flip, from the practice of “flipping” (rapidly pouring) the mixture between two pitchers to mix it.

 

 

 

One very early example: Isaac Weld, Junior, in his book Travels Through the States of North America and the Provinces of Upper and Lower Canada, during the years 1795, 1796, and 1797 (published in 1800) wrote: “The American travellers, before they pursued their journey, took a hearty draught each, according to custom, of egg-nog, a mixture composed of new milk, eggs, rum, and sugar, beat up together;…”

In Britain, the drink was popular mainly among the aristocracy. Those who could get milk and eggs mixed it with brandy, Madeira or sherry to make a drink similar to modern alcoholic egg nog. The drink is described in Cold Comfort Farm (chapter 21) as a Hell’s Angel, made with an egg, two ounces of brandy, a teaspoonful of cream, and some chips of ice, where it is served as breakfast.

The drink crossed the Atlantic to the English colonies during the 18th century. Since brandy and wine were heavily taxed, rum from the Triangular Trade with the Caribbean was a cost-effective substitute. The inexpensive liquor, coupled with plentiful farm and dairy products, helped the drink become very popular in America. When the supply of rum to the newly founded United States was reduced as a consequence of the American Revolutionary War, Americans turned to domestic whiskey, and eventually bourbon in particular, as a substitute.

The Eggnog Riot occurred at the United States Military Academy on 23–25 December 1826. Whiskey was smuggled into the barracks to make eggnog for a Christmas Day party. The incident resulted in the court-martialing of twenty cadets and one enlisted soldier.

 

 

 
Traditional eggnog typically consists of milk, sugar, raw eggs, and spices, usually nutmeg. Cream may be included to make a richer and thicker drink, though some modern eggnogs add gelatin. Vanilla is a common flavoring, with grated nutmeg sprinkled on top. Other toppings include whipped cream, meringue, cinnamon, ice cream, and chocolate curls.

Eggnog can be homemade from recipes. Ready-made eggnog versions are seasonally available and may contain whiskey, rum, brandy, bourbon, or cognac. Also available are “mixes” that contain all the ingredients except the liquor. With these the end-user can tailor the strength of the drink, from rather strong, to only a taste of liquor, to no liquor at all.

Though eggnog is high in fat and cholesterol, low-fat and no-sugar formulations are available using skimmed or lowfat milk.

 

 

 

Under current U.S. law, commercial products sold as eggnog are permitted to contain milk, sugar, modified milk ingredients, glucose-fructose, water, carrageenan, guar gum, natural and artificial flavorings, spices (though not necessarily nutmeg), monoglycerides, and colorings. The ingredients in commercial eggnog vary significantly, but generally raw eggs are not included.

 

 

 

"Silk Nog," a commercial soy milk eggnog.

“Silk Nog,” a commercial soy milk eggnog.

Some North American manufacturers offer soy, almond, rice or coconut milk-based alternatives for vegans and those with dairy allergies.

The history of non-dairy eggnogs goes back to at least 1899 when Almeda Lambert, in her Guide for Nut Cookery, gave a recipe for “Egg Nog” made using coconut cream, eggs, and sugar.

In 1973, Eunice Farmilant, in The Natural Foods Sweet-Tooth Cookbook, gave a more modern non-dairy eggnog recipe using 3 eggs separated, 2 tablespoons of barley malt extract or Amasake syrup, 4 cups of chilled soy milk, 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract, and nutmeg, (p. 138-39)

In December 1981, Grain Country of Los Angeles, California, introduced Grain Nog, the earliest known non-dairy and vegan eggnog. Based on amazake (a traditional Japanese fermented rice beverage) and containing no eggs, it was available in plain, strawberry, and carob flavors.

Also in December 1981, Redwood Valley Soyfoods Unlimited (California) introduced Soynog, the earliest known soy-based non-dairy and vegan eggnog based on soy milk and tofu (added for thickness). It was renamed Lite Nog in 1982 and Tofu Nog in 1985.

 

 

 
Some recipes for homemade eggnog call for egg yolks to be cooked with milk into a custard to avoid potential hazards from raw eggs; eggnog has much in common with classic custard-pudding recipes that do not call for corn starch, and many types of eggnog can also be cooked into egg-custard puddings, or churned into eggnog-flavored ice cream.
For concerns about the safety of selling products made from raw eggs and milk, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has changed or altered the definition of eggnog a number of times towards artificial replacements for the large number of eggs traditionally required. Modern FDA regulations require eggnog to contain at least 1% egg yolk solids and “milk or milk products.”

In the home and in restaurants, eggnog can be made more safely by using pasteurized eggs.

 

One of America’s Favorite Christmas Treats – Gingerbread Man

December 9, 2014 at 6:36 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 3 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Gingerbread man

Gingerbread man

A gingerbread man is a biscuit or cookie made of gingerbread, usually in the shape of a stylized human, although other shapes, especially seasonal themes (Christmas, Halloween, Easter, etc.) and characters, are quite common as well.

 

 

 

Gingerbread dates back to the 15th century, and figural biscuit-making was practiced in the 16th century. The first documented instance of figure-shaped gingerbread biscuits was at the court of Elizabeth I of England. She had the gingerbread figures made and presented in the likeness of some of her important guests.

Most gingerbread men share the same roughly humanoid shape, with stubby feet and no fingers. Many gingerbread men have a face, though whether the features are indentations within the face itself or other candies stuck on with icing or chocolate varies from recipe to recipe. Other decorations are common; hair, shirt cuffs, and shoes are sometimes applied, but by far the most popular decoration is shirt buttons, which are traditionally represented by gum drops, icing, or raisins.

 

Gingerbread man and his wife

Gingerbread man and his wife

 

According to the 2009 Guinness Book of Records, the world’s largest gingerbread man was made on December 2, 2006 by the Smithville Area Chamber of Commerce in Smithville, Texas, at their annual Festival of Lights celebration. The gingerbread man weighed in at 1,308 lbs, 8 oz (593.5 kg), and stood at over 20 feet (more than 6 m). On December 6, 2008, also in conjunction with the annual Festival of Lights celebration, a monument was dedicated in honor of the feat made from the very cookie sheet that was used to break the record.

 

 

 
Gingerbread Men Cookies (From http://allrecipes.com/recipe/gingerbread-men-cookies/)

 
“These Gingerbread Men Cookies are as cute as can be. If desired, decorate with raisins, currants or cinnamon red hot candies for eyes and buttons. Or, pipe untinted or colored icing onto cookies.”
INGREDIENTS:
3 cups flour
2 teaspoons McCormick® Ginger,
Ground
1 teaspoon McCormick® Cinnamon,
Ground
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon McCormick® Nutmeg,
Ground
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup butter, softened
3/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1/2 cup molasses
1 egg
1 teaspoon McCormick® Pure Vanilla
Extract

 
DIRECTIONS:
1. Mix flour, ginger, cinnamon, baking soda, nutmeg and salt in large bowl. Set aside. Beat butter and brown sugar in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until light and fluffy. Add molasses, egg and vanilla;mix well. Gradually beat in flour mixture on low speed until well mixed. Press dough into a thick flat disk. Wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate 4 hours or overnight.
2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Roll out dough to 1/4-inch thickness on lightly floured work surface. Cut into gingerbread men shapes with 5-inch cookie cutter. Place 1 inch apart on ungreased baking sheets.
3. Bake 8 to 10 minutes or until edges of cookies are set and just begin to brown. Cool on baking sheets 1 to 2 minutes. Remove to wire racks; cool completely. Decorate cooled cookies as desired. Store cookies in airtight container up to5 days.
Nutrition
Information
Servings Per Recipe: 24
Calories: 158
Amount Per Serving
Total Fat: 6.1g
Cholesterol: 24mg
Sodium: 125mg
Amount Per Serving
Total Carbs: 24g
Dietary Fiber: 0.5g
Protein: 2g
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/gingerbread-men-cookies/

One of America’s Favorite Christmas Treats – Red Velvet Cake

December 5, 2014 at 6:41 AM | Posted in dessert, One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Four-layer slice of red velvet cake

Four-layer slice of red velvet cake

My Grandmother passed away many years ago, but rarely a day goes by where I don’t think of her and smile. Christmas was always special at Grandmother’s House. You would open the door and the aromas would send your mouth watering! I can’t ever remember a Christmas Holiday where she didn’t bake a Red Velvet Cake, and it would just melt in your mouth.

 

 
Red velvet cake is a cake with either a dark red, bright red or red-brown color. It is traditionally prepared as a layer cake topped with cream cheese or cooked roux icing. The reddish color is often enhanced by adding beetroot or red food coloring.

Common ingredients include buttermilk, butter, cocoa, and flour for the cake, beetroot or red food coloring for the color.

 
History
* James Beard’s 1972 reference, American Cookery, describes three red velvet cakes varying in the amounts of shortening and butter, also vegetable oil. All used red food coloring, but the reaction of acidic vinegar and buttermilk tends to better reveal the red anthocyanin in cocoa and keeps the cake moist, light and fluffy. This natural tinting may have been the source for the name “red velvet” as well as “Devil’s food” and similar names for chocolate cakes.

* When foods were rationed during World War II, bakers used boiled beet juices to enhance the color of their cakes. Beets are found in some red velvet cake recipes, where they also serve to retain moisture. Adams Extract, a Texas company, is credited for bringing the red velvet cake to kitchens across America during the time of the Great Depression by being one of the first to sell red food coloring and other flavor extracts with the use of point-of-sale posters and tear-off recipe cards. The cake and its original recipe are well known in the United States from New York City’s famous Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. However, it is widely considered a Southern recipe. Traditionally, the cake is iced with a French-style butter roux icing (also called ermine icing), which is very light and fluffy but time-consuming to prepare. Cream cheese frosting and buttercream frosting are variations which have increased in popularity.

* In Canada, the cake was a well-known dessert in the restaurants and bakeries of the Eaton’s department store chain in the 1940s and 1950s. Promoted as an exclusive Eaton’s recipe, with employees who knew the recipe sworn to silence, many mistakenly believed the cake to be the invention of the department store matriarch, Lady Eaton. In January 2014, Tim Hortons began selling the Red Velvet muffin as a seasonal item.

* In recent years, red velvet cake and red velvet cupcakes have become increasingly popular in the US and many European countries. A resurgence in the popularity of this cake is attributed by some to the 1989 film Steel Magnolias which included a red velvet groom’s cake made in the shape of an armadillo. Magnolia Bakery in Manhattan, having served it since its opening in 1996, certainly helped to popularize it, as did restaurants known for their Southern cooking like Amy Ruth’s in Harlem, which opened in 1998. Cake Man Raven opened one of the first bakeries devoted to the cake, in Brooklyn, in 2000.

 
* Below are links to various Red Velvet Cake Recipes

 

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/southern-red-velvet-cake-recipe.html

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/red-velvet-cake-recipe.html

http://www.joyofbaking.com/RedVelvetCake.html

http://divascancook.com/the-best-red-velvet-cake-recipe-easy-homemade-moist-with-southern-flair/

One of America’s Favorite Christmas Treats – Candy Cane

December 2, 2014 at 6:40 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , ,
Candy Cane

Candy Cane

A candy cane or peppermint stick is a cane-shaped hard candy stick associated with Christmas. It is traditionally white with red stripes and flavored with peppermint; but is also made in a variety of other flavors and colors.

 

 

 

According to folklore, in 1670, in Cologne, Germany, the choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral, wishing to remedy the noise caused by children in his church during the Living Crèche tradition of Christmas Eve, asked a local candy maker for some sweet sticks for them. In order to justify the practice of giving candy to children during worship services, he asked the candy maker to add a crook to the top of each stick, which would help children remember the shepherds who paid visit to infant Jesus. In addition, he used the white color of the converted sticks to teach children about the Christian belief in the sinless life of Jesus. From Germany, the candy canes spread to other parts of Europe, where they were handed out during plays reenacting the Nativity.

Snopes.com – a web site that researches urban legends, Internet rumors, e-mail forwards, and other stories of unknown or questionable origin – deems the account false, citing its “significant historical problems” and the inability to provide conclusive evidence that verifies the account.

A recipe for straight peppermint candy sticks, white with colored stripes, was published in 1844. The candy cane has been mentioned in literature since 1866, was first mentioned in association with Christmas in 1874, and as early as 1882 was hung on Christmas trees.

 

 

An early image of candy canes

An early image of candy canes

Chicago confectioners the Bunte Brothers filed the one of the earliest patents for candy cane making machines in the early 1920s. Meanwhile, in 1919 in Albany, Georgia, Bob McCormack began making candy canes for local children. By the middle of the century his company (originally the Famous Candy Company, then the Mills-McCormack Candy Company, and later Bobs Candies) had become one of the world’s leading candy cane producers. But candy cane manufacturing initially required a fair bit of labor that limited production quantities. The canes had to be bent manually as they came off the assembly line in order to create their ‘J’ shape, and breakage often ran over 20 percent. It was McCormack’s brother-in-law, a seminary student in Rome named Gregory Harding Keller, who used to spend his summers back home working in the candy factory. In 1957, now ordained a Roman Catholic priest of the Diocese of Little Rock, Keller patented his invention, the Keller Machine which automated the process of twisting soft candy into spiral striping and then cutting them into precise lengths as candy canes. Fr. Keller and his machine gained national fame in the 1960s when he was a contestant on the popular TV show What’s My Line.

 

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Honey Homestead

My quest to grow 3 beehives into financial independence & the homestead that followed

SurreyKitchen

Living Life and Food

Eat the Vegan Rainbow

tips & tricks for plant-based home cooks

Shanice eats

Food, Music & Lifestyle journal

Tony's Fun Kitchen

Food Recipes, Good Times, Fun Conversation

Zest4Food

Savour the seasons with me on a virtual culinary journey and discover international cooking and baking recipes

vickidelbrouck

how to shop the sales and plan menus your kids will love

Green Kitchen Stories

Healthy Vegetarian Recipes.

joypassiondesire

No matter what you have been through, you can feel good again

The Wooden Skillet

- Wholesome + Healing + Real Food -

oliviagonzalez

Chef, Blogger and Food Photographer

The Literary Feast

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.” - Virginia Woolf

Home Cooking Heaven

Delicious, hearty, homecooked recipes

More Time at the Table

Cooking with Alyce Morgan

The Painted Apron

This WordPress.com site is about inspiration, creativity, painting & food!