It’s Nuts I tell you…….HONEY GONE NUTS GRANOLA

September 14, 2017 at 5:01 AM | Posted in nuts, NUTS COM | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week from the nuts.com website (https://nuts.com/) its HONEY GONE NUTS GRANOLA. Healthy and Delicious HONEY GONE NUTS GRANOLA. Made with almonds, cashews, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and walnuts. Topped with vanilla and honey. This is just one of many items that you can find at the Nuts site. You can choose from items like; NUTS, DRIED FRUIT, CHOCOLATES and SWEETS, SNACKS, COFFEE and TEA, COOKING and BAKING, and GIFTS. Plus there’s FREE shipping on orders over $59, see for details. So be sure to check out the nuts.com website today (https://nuts.com/)

 

 

 

HONEY GONE NUTS GRANOLA
This fresh and crunchy granola is healthy and ever so tasty. We take rolled oats and blend them with almonds, cashews, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and walnuts. Then we add a touch of vanilla and honey for an unbelievable taste and crunch. Tastes great as a snack or with cereal , yogurt, and ice cream.

Ingredients
Rolled oats, Honey, Canola Oil, Almonds, Coconut, Sunflower Seeds, Molasses, Walnuts, Sesame Seeds, Cashews, Water, Salt, Natural Flavor. Packaged in the same facility as peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, and milk products.

Nutrition Facts
Serving size 60g (~2.1 oz.)

Amount per serving
Calories 250
Calories from Fat 100
%DV
Total Fat 11g 17%
Saturated Fat 2g 10%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 50mg 2%
Total Carbohydrate 36g 12%
Dietary Fiber 5g 20%
Sugars 10g
Protein 7g
Vitamin A 0%
Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 4%
Iron 15%

Storage
Store in a cool dry place for up to 6 months. It is ok to refrigerate.
https://nuts.com/snacks/granola/honey-gone-nuts.html

 

Order securely online or call us:
800-558-6887 or 908-523-0333
https://nuts.com/

Advertisements

Mushroom Veggie Burger

November 1, 2016 at 5:02 AM | Posted in vegetables | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Here’s a Mushroom Veggie Burger to go with those Spicy Baked Sweet Potato Fries!

 

Mushroom Veggie Burger

Ingredients
2 tablespoons light olive oil
3 (8 ounce) packages sliced fresh mushrooms
1/2 onion, finely chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
2/3 cup rolled oats
3/4 cup dry bread crumbs
2 eggs, beaten
1/2 cup freshly shredded Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
2 tablespoons light olive oil
Directions
1 – Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat; add mushrooms, onion, and garlic to the hot oil and season with salt, black pepper,oregano, thyme, and nutmeg. Cook and stir mushroom mixture until mushrooms have given up their juice and the juice has almost evaporated, about 10 minutes. Transfer cooked mushrooms to a cutting board and chop into small chunks with a knife.
2 – Transfer mushrooms to a large bowl. Mix in rolled oats and bread crumbs; taste for salt and black pepper and add more to taste. Stir Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese into the mixture, followed by eggs. Let mixture stand for the crumbs to soak up excess liquid, about 15 minutes. (At this point you can refrigerate the mixture to cook later if desired.) Moisten hands with a little vegetable oil or water, pick up about 1/4 cup of mixture, and form into burgers.
3 – Heat remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil in a skillet over medium heat and pan-fry burgers until browned and cooked through, 5 to 6 minutes.

The Saturday Evening Dessert – Peanut Butter Granola Bites

September 10, 2016 at 5:17 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Saturday Evening Dessert | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

For this week’s Saturday Evening Dessert its Peanut Butter Granola Bites. A high fiber cookie that has; Chunky peanut butter, cornflakes, oats, raisins , honey, and Equal. You can find this recipe on several sites but I’m going with the one on the CooksRecipes. I love the Cooks website, its loaded with recipes to suit all tastes and cuisines, check it out soon! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

 

Peanut Butter Granola Bites

A hearty cookie filled with lots of fiber and good flavor. Chunky peanut butter, cornflakes, oats and raisins provide the fiber; a hint of honey and cinnamon the other great flavors.

Recipe Ingredients:Cooksrecipes 2

2 cups cornflakes
1 cup quick oats, uncooked
2/3 cup seedless raisins
1/2 cup chunky peanut butter
1/2 cup egg substitute or 4 large egg whites
1 cup Equal® Spoonful*
1 tablespoon honey
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Cooking Directions:

1 – Combine cornflakes, oats and raisins in large bowl.
2 – Combine peanut butter and egg substitute in medium bowl. Stir in Equal®, honey, vanilla and cinnamon until well blended. Spoon over cereal mixture. Toss gently to combine. Let stand 5 minutes.
3 – Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C).
4 – Shape mixture into 1-inch balls. Place on lightly sprayed baking sheet.
5 – Bake 8 to 10 minutes or until light golden and dough is set. Remove from baking sheet and cool completely on wire rack.
6 – Store in airtight containers at room temperature.
Makes 30 servings.

*May substitute 24 packets Equal sweetener

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/30 of recipe; 1 cookie): calories 56, protein 2 g, carbohydrate 8 g, fat 2 g, cholesterol 0 mg, sodium 42 mg.

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/peanut_butter_granola_bites_recipe.html

Harvest Pumpkin-Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

September 15, 2015 at 5:15 AM | Posted in baking | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

This recipe has Autumn written all over it, Harvest Pumpkin-Oatmeal Raisin Cookies. It’s from one of my favorite recipe sites the CooksRecipes website. http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 
Harvest Pumpkin-Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

A healthy pumpkin cookie delicious not only at harvest time, but any time of the year.

Recipe Ingredients:Cooksrecipes 2

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cups quick or old-fashioned oats
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup butter or margarine, softened
1/2 cup Splenda® Sugar Blend
1/2 cup Splenda® Brown Sugar Blend, packed
1 cup LIBBY’S® 100% Pure Pumpkin
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 cup chopped walnuts
3/4 cup raisins

 

Cooking Directions:

Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C). Spray baking pans with nonstick cooking spray; set aside.
Combine flour, oats, baking soda, cinnamon and salt in medium bowl. Beat butter, Splenda® Sugar Blend and Splenda® Brown Sugar
Blend in large bowl at medium speed until light and fluffy. Add pumpkin, egg and vanilla extract; mix well. Add flour mixture; mix well. Stir in walnuts and raisins. Drop by rounded tablespoons onto prepared baking sheets.
Bake 14 to 16 minutes or until cookies are lightly browned and set in centers. Cool on baking sheets for 2 minutes; remove to wire racks to cool completely.
Makes 48 cookies.

 

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/48 of recipe; 1 cookie): Calories 110 | Calories from Fat 50 | Fat 5.0g (sat 2.5g) | Cholesterol 15mg | Sodium 90mg | Carbohydrates 12g | Fiber 1g | Sugars 6g | Protein 2g.

 

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/harvest_pumpkin-oatmeal_raisin_cookies_recipe.html

Diabetic Dish of the Week – Chewy Granola Bars

December 30, 2014 at 6:22 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Here’s a Diabetic Friendly Recipe for Chewy Granola Bars!

 
Chewy Granola Bars

 

Ingredients

1 cup low-fat granola
1 cup rolled oats
1/2 cup mixed nuts
1/2 cup white whole wheat flour or whole wheat flour
1/2 cup raisins
1 egg, beaten or 1/4 cup Egg Beater’s
3 tablespoons packed brown sugar
3 tablespoons cooking oil
3 tablespoons honey
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Directions

Line an 8x8x2-inch baking pan with foil. Grease the foil; set pan aside. In a large bowl combine granola, oats, nuts, flour, and raisins in a large mixing bowl. In small bowl stir together egg, brown sugar, oil, honey, and cinnamon in a small bowl. Add to granola mixture until well coated. Press evenly into the prepared pan.
Bake in oven to 325 degrees F for 25 to 30 minutes or until lightly browned around the edges. Cool in pan on a wire rack. Use foil to remove from pan, cut into bars.

 

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:

PER SERVING: 99 cal., 4 g total fat (1 g sat. fat), 9 mg chol., 14 mg sodium, 15 g carb, 1 g fiber, 2 g pro.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 19, 2014 at 6:23 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , ,

An easy method of thickening stews, soups, or creamed vegetables is to add a small amount of quick-cooking oats, a grated potato, or some mashed potatoes. Never add flour directly, as it will clump. However, you can mix flour with melted butter and add the mixture to your dish.

Grain of the Week – Oats

February 20, 2014 at 8:51 AM | Posted in Grain of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , ,
Oat plants

Oat plants

The common oat (Avena sativa) is a species of cereal grain grown for its seed, which is known by the same name (usually in the plural, unlike other grains). While oats are suitable for human consumption as oatmeal and rolled oats, one of the most common uses is as livestock feed. However, it is uncommon for ordinary people to consume them raw as animals do.

 

 

 
The wild ancestor of Avena sativa and the closely related minor crop, A. byzantina, is the hexaploid wild oat A. sterilis. Genetic evidence shows the ancestral forms of A. sterilis grew in the Fertile Crescent of the Near East. Domesticated oats appear relatively late, and far from the Near East, in Bronze Age Europe. Oats, like rye, are usually considered a secondary crop, i.e., derived from a weed of the primary cereal domesticates wheat and barley. As these cereals spread westwards into cooler, wetter areas, this may have favored the oat weed component, leading to its eventual domestication.

 

 

 
Oats are grown in temperate regions. They have a lower summer heat requirement and greater tolerance of rain than other cereals, such as wheat, rye or barley, so are particularly important in areas with cool, wet summers, such as Northwest Europe; they are even being grown in Iceland to help prolong the growing season.[3] Oats are an annual plant, and can be planted either in autumn (for late summer harvest) or in the spring (for early autumn harvest).
On the Indian subcontinent, oats (known locally in Hindi, Punjabi, Awadhi, Bhojpuri, and Nepali languages as “jaei” are grown on the foothills of Himalayas, such as in the Indian state of Punjab, Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. References to its cultivation can be found in the epic Mahabharat.

 

 

 

Porridge oats before cooking

Porridge oats before cooking

Oats have numerous uses in foods; most commonly, they are rolled or crushed into oatmeal, or ground into fine oat flour. Oatmeal is chiefly eaten as porridge, but may also be used in a variety of baked goods, such as oatcakes, oatmeal cookies, and oat bread. Oats are also an ingredient in many cold cereals, in particular muesli and granola. Oats may also be consumed raw, and cookies with raw oats are becoming popular.
Historical attitudes towards oats have varied. Oat bread was first manufactured in Britain, where the first oat bread factory was established in 1899. In Scotland, they were, and still are, held in high esteem, as a mainstay of the national diet.
In Scotland, a dish called cow pat was made by soaking the husks from oats for a week, so the fine, floury part of the meal remained as sediment to be strained off, boiled and eaten. Oats are also widely used there as a thickener in soups, as barley or rice might be used in other countries.
Oats are also commonly used as feed for horses when extra carbohydrates, and the subsequent boost in energy, are required. The oat hull may be crushed (“rolled” or “crimped”) for the horse to more easily digest the grain,[citation needed] or may be fed whole. They may be given alone or as part of a blended food pellet. Cattle are also fed oats, either whole, or ground into a coarse flour using a roller mill, burr mill, or hammer mill.
Winter oats may be grown as an off-season groundcover and ploughed under in the spring as a green fertilizer, or harvested in early summer. They also can be used for pasture; they can be grazed a while, then allowed to head out for grain production, or grazed continuously until other pastures are ready.
Oat straw is prized by cattle and horse producers as bedding, due to its soft, relatively dust-free, and absorbent nature. The straw can also be used for making corn dollies. Tied in a muslin bag, oat straw was used to soften bath water.
Oats are also occasionally used in several different drinks. In Britain, they are sometimes used for brewing beer. Oatmeal stout is one variety brewed using a percentage of oats for the wort. The more rarely used oat malt is produced by the Thomas Fawcett & Sons Maltings, and was used in the Maclay Oat Malt Stout before Maclays Brewery ceased independent brewing operations. A cold, sweet drink called avena made of ground oats and milk is a popular refreshment throughout Latin America. Oatmeal caudle, made of ale and oatmeal with spices, was a traditional British drink and a favourite of Oliver Cromwell.
Oat extract can also be used to soothe skin conditions. It is the principal ingredient for the Aveeno line of products.
Oat grass has been used traditionally for medicinal purposes, including to help balance the menstrual cycle, treat dysmenorrhoea, and for osteoporosis and urinary tract infections.

 

 

 
Oats are generally considered “healthful”, or a health food, being touted commercially as nutritious. The discovery of their healthy cholesterol-lowering properties has led to wider appreciation of oats as human food.

 

 

 
Oat bran is the outer casing of the oat. Its consumption is believed to lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and possibly to reduce the risk of heart disease.
Oats contain more soluble fiber than any other grain, resulting in slower digestion and an extended sensation of fullness. One type of soluble fibre, beta-glucans, has been proven to help lower cholesterol.

Oats are the only cereal containing a globulin or legume-like protein, avenalin, as the major (80%) storage protein. Globulins are characterised by solubility in dilute saline. The more typical cereal proteins, such as gluten and zein, are prolamines (prolamins). The minor protein of oat is a prolamine, avenin.
Oat protein is nearly equivalent in quality to soy protein, which World Health Organization research has shown to be equal to meat, milk, and egg protein. The protein content of the hull-less oat kernel (groat) ranges from 12 to 24%, the highest among cereals.

 

 

 
Oats are sown in the spring or early summer in colder areas, as soon as the soil can be worked. An early start is crucial to good yields, as oats go dormant in summer heat. In warmer areas, oats are sown in late summer or early fall. Oats are cold-tolerant and are unaffected by late frosts or snow.

 

 

 

Harvest techniques are a matter of available equipment, local tradition, and priorities. Farmers seeking the highest yield from their crops time their harvest so the kernels have reached 35% moisture, or when the greenest kernels are just turning cream-color. They then harvest by swathing, cutting the plants at about 10 cm (4 inches) above ground, and putting the swathed plants into windrows with the grain all oriented the same way. They leave the windrows to dry in the sun for several days before combining them using a pickup header. Finally, they bale the straw.
Oats can also be left standing until completely ripe and then combined with a grain head. This causes greater field losses as the grain falls from the heads, and to harvesting losses, as the grain is threshed out by the reel. Without a draper head, there is also more damage to the straw, since it is not properly oriented as it enters the combine’s throat. Overall yield loss is 10–15% compared to proper swathing.
Historical harvest methods involved cutting with a scythe or sickle, and threshing under the feet of cattle. Late 19th- and early 20th-century harvesting was performed using a binder. Oats were gathered into shocks, and then collected and run through a stationary threshing machine.

 

 

 
After combining, the oats are transported to the farmyard using a grain truck, semi, or road train, where they are augered or conveyed into a bin for storage. Sometimes, when there is not enough bin space, they are augered into portable grain rings, or piled on the ground. Oats can be safely stored at 12% moisture; at higher moisture levels, they must be aerated, or dried.

 

 

 

Oat grains in their husks

Oat grains in their husks

In the United States, No.1 oats weigh 42 pounds per US bushel (541 kg/m3); No.3 oats must weigh at least 38 lb/US bu (489 kg/m3). If over 36 lb/US bu (463 kg/m3), they are graded as No.4, and oats under 36 lb/US bu (463 kg/m3) are graded as “light weight”.
In Canada, No.1 oats weigh 42.64 lb/US bu (549 kg/m3); No.2 oats must weigh 40.18 lb/US bu (517 kg/m3); No.3 oats must weigh at least 38.54 lb/US bu (496 kg/m3) and if oats are lighter than 36.08 lb/US bu (464 kg/m3) they do not make No.4 oats and have no grade.
Note, however, that oats are bought and sold, and yields are figured, on the basis of a bushel equal to 32 pounds (14.5 kg or 412 kg/m3) in the United States and a bushel equal to 34 pounds (15.4 kg or 438 kg/m3) in Canada. Yields range from 60 to 80 US bushels per acre (5.2–7.0 m3/ha) on marginal land, to 100 to 150 US bushels per acre (8.7–13.1 m3/ha) on high-producing land. The average production is 100 bushels per acre, or 3.5 tonnes per hectare.
Straw yields are variable, ranging from one to three tonnes per hectare, mainly due to available nutrients, and the variety used (some are short-strawed, meant specifically for straight combining).

 

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Leels Cooks

Nom Nom Nom

SIMPLY SERENE

My mission is to deliver scientifically-backed information on gut health and the human microbiome, inspiring a culture of healthy living that is SIMPLY SERENE.

luxlifefinn

All things food - home cooking recipes and fine dining reviews

olivesandfeta

Fresh and vibrant Mediterranean and Australian Inspired Cuisine.

Goddess Cooks

....unearthly delights to feed your soul!

Recipes by chefkreso

Cooking with imagination

TWENTY-FOUR CARAT

GENUINE INFORMATION ABOUT REAL THINGS

Moosmosis

Exploring an Arts & Sciences Education

The Throwback Chef

vintage recipes tried and shared

Wishing Wells Life

Real Food, Real Creativity, Real Life

Mediterranean Recipes 101

Mediterranean diet is based on the tradtional food that people used to eat in counntries like Italy, Greece, and Spain.

In Dianes Kitchen

Recipes showing step by step directions with pictures and gadget reviews

The World according to Dina

Notes on Seeing, Reading & Writing, Living & Loving in The North

Patriot Mom

Family. Health. Liberty.

Be Unique

Blogging, vlogging and dealing with life

Heathers' Fresh Cooking

Fresh ingredients and great ideas for your table.