Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 29, 2013 at 10:18 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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While perusing the cereal aisle, you’ll quickly realize that hot cereals are cheaper than cold ones. Though they may not be as popular with your family, try saving money by making hot cereal at least once a week. It’s often more nutritious, so it’s worth it to make the switch

One of America’s Favorites – Oatmeal

April 8, 2013 at 9:56 AM | Posted in cooking | Leave a comment
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Oatmeal, also known as white oats is ground oat groats (i.e. oat-meal, cf. cornmeal, peasemeal, etc.), or a porridge made from oats

Rolled oats, a type of oatmeal

Rolled oats, a type of oatmeal

(also called oatmeal cereal or stirabout, in Ireland). Oatmeal can also be ground oat, steel-cut oats, crushed oats, or rolled oats.

The oat grains are de-husked by impact, then heated and cooled to stabilize the “Oat groats”, the seed inside the husk. The process of heating produces a nutty flavour in the oats. These oat groats may be milled to produce fine, medium or coarse oatmeal. Rolled oats are steamed and flattened whole oat groats. Steel cut oats may be small and broken groats from the de-husking process; these may be steamed and flattened to produce smaller rolled oats. Quick-cooking rolled oats (quick oats) are cut into small pieces before being steamed and rolled. Instant oatmeal is pre-cooked and dried, usually with sweetener and flavouring added. Both types of rolled oats may be eaten uncooked as in muesli or may be cooked to make porridge. It is also used as an ingredient in oatmeal cookies and oat cakes, or as an accent, as in the topping on many oat bran breads and the coating on Caboc cheese. Oatmeal is also sometimes porridge with the bran or fibrous husk as well as the oat kernel or groat. In some countries rolled oats are eaten raw with milk and sugar or raisins. Oatmeal is also used as a thickening agent in savoury Arabic/Egyptian thick meat plus vegetable soups.
An oatmeal bath, made by adding a cup of finely ground oatmeal to one’s bathwater, is also commonly used to ease the discomfort associated with such things as chickenpox, poison ivy, eczema, sunburn and dry skin.

There has been increasing interest in oatmeal in recent years because of its health benefits. Daily consumption of a bowl of oatmeal can lower blood cholesterol, because of its soluble fibre content. After it was reported that oats can help lower cholesterol, an “oat bran craze” swept the U.S. in the late 1980s, peaking in 1989. The food craze was short-lived and faded by the early 1990s. The popularity of oatmeal and other oat products increased again after the January 1997 decision by the Food and Drug Administration that food with a lot of oat bran or rolled oats can carry a label claiming it may reduce the risk of heart disease when combined with a low-fat diet. This is because of the beta-glucan in the oats. Rolled oats have long been a staple of many athletes’ diets, especially weight trainers, because of its high content of complex carbohydrates and water-soluble fibre that encourages slow digestion and stabilizes blood-glucose levels. Oatmeal porridge also contains more B vitamins and calories than other kinds of porridges.

Oatmeal has a long history in Scottish culinary tradition because oats are better suited than wheat to Scotland’s short, wet growing

Oatmeal is a prime ingredient of haggis, seen here at a Burns supper

Oatmeal is a prime ingredient of haggis, seen here at a Burns supper

season. Oats became the staple grain of that country. The Ancient universities of Scotland had a holiday called Meal Monday to permit students to return to their farms and collect more oats for food.
Samuel Johnson referred, disparagingly, to this in his dictionary definition for oats: “A grain, which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people.” His biographer, James Boswell, noted that Lord Elibank was said by Sir Walter Scott to have retorted, “Yes, and where else will you see such horses and such men?”
A common method of cooking oatmeal in Scotland is to soak it overnight in salted water and cook on a low heat in the morning for a few minutes until the mixture thickens.
In Scotland, oatmeal is created by grinding oats into a coarse powder. Various grades are available depending on the thoroughness of the grinding, including Coarse, Pin(head) and Fine oatmeal. The main uses are:
* Traditional porridge
* Brose: a thick mixture made with uncooked oatmeal (or medium oatmeal that has been dry toasted by stirring it around in a dry pot over heat until it turns a slightly darker shade and emits a sweet, nutty fragrance) and then adding butter or cream. Brose is eaten like porridge but much more filling.
* Quick-cooking rolled oats(distinct from “instant” variations) are often used for this purpose nowadays, because they are quicker to prepare.
* Gruel, made by mixing oatmeal with cold water that is strained and heated for the benefit of infants and people recovering from illness.
* in the manufacture of bannocks or oatcakes
* as a stuffing for poultry
* as a coating for Caboc cheese
* as the main ingredient of the Scottish dish skirlie, or its chip-shop counterpart, the deep-fried thickly-battered mealy pudding
* mixed with sheep’s blood, salt, and pepper to make Highland black pudding (marag dubh).
* mixed with fat, water, onions and seasoning, and boiled in a sheep’s intestine to make “marag geal”‘ Outer Hebridean white pudding, served sliced with fried eggs at breakfast. A sweeter version with dried fruit is also known.
* as a major component of haggis.
* in sowans, not strictly made from the meal itself but a porridge-like dish made from the fermented inner husks of oats.

In the U.S. state of Vermont, oatmeal making has a long tradition originating with the Scottish settlement of the state. While there are variations, most begin with heavy steel cut oats. The oats are soaked overnight in cold water, salt, and maple syrup. Early the next morning, before beginning farm chores, the cook adds ground nutmeg, ground cinnamon, and sometimes ground ginger. The pot is placed over heat and cooked for 90 minutes or more, and served after the chores with cream, milk, or butter. As most contemporary Vermonters no longer have farm chores, the recipe is simplified to a briefer 10 to 30 minute cooking at a higher heat. Vermont leads the U.S. in per capita consumption of cooked oatmeal cereal.

The havregrynsgröt – porridge made from rolled oats, water and/or milk and often added raisins – is a traditional breakfast staple in Sweden. Porridge made from rye (vattgröt) or barley (bjuggröt) was more common during the Middle Ages.

Mozzarella &Turkey Sausage Flatbread Pizza

October 27, 2012 at 5:35 PM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products, low calorie, low carb, mushrooms, pizza | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Mozzarella &Turkey Sausage Flatbread Pizza

A hot fresh made Flatbread Pizza just sounded good on this cold and blustery Saturday. I made a Mozzarella &Turkey Sausage Flatbread Pizza. I used Flatout Flatbread Thin Crust Flatbread Heritage Wheat as my Flatbread. Love this Flatbread, it’s low in carbs and calories, browns up real nice, and has a fantastic pizza crust taste.

For my toppings I used Classico Traditional Pizza Sauce, Fresh Mozzarella Cheese Slices, sliced Black Olives, Hormel Sliced Turkey Pepperoni, sliced Baby Bella Mushrooms, and Jennie – O Spicy Turkey Breakfast Sausage. Everything combined makes one fantastic Pizza! A great alternative to high calorie and carb Pizza’s. This one’s right around 350 calories and its missing none of the taste of regular Pizza! For dessert later a bowl of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream topped with Smucker’s Sugar Free Hot Fudge Topping.

Flatout Flatbread Thin Crust Flatbreads Heritage Wheat

NEW!
7g Protein
Good Source of Fiber
Easy to make… Grill it! Bake it!

INGREDIENTS: ENRICHED FLOUR (WHEAT FLOUR, MALTED BARLEY FLOUR, NIACIN, IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WATER, PRETZEL CRUMB: ENRICHED FLOUR (WHEAT FLOUR, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WATER, YEAST, SODA, VITAL WHEAT GLUTEN, SOYBEAN OIL, LESS THAN 2% OF EACH OF THE FOLLOWING: YEAST, OAT FIBER, SODIUM ACID PYROPHOSPHATE, BAKING SODA, CARAMEL COLOR, DEXTROSE, SALT, FUMARIC ACID, PRESERVATIVES (POTASSIUM SORBATE AND SODIUM PROPIONATE), CELLULOSE GUM, GUAR GUM, XANTHAN GUM, MALTODEXTRIN, WHEAT PROTEIN ISOLATE, CALCIUM SULFATE, ENZYMES. CONTAINS: WHEAT AND SOYBEANS. MANUFACTURED IN A FACILITY THAT ALSO PROCESSES PRODUCTS CONTAINING MILK.

http://www.flatoutbread.com/products/thin-crust-artisan-pizza/heritage-wheat/

http://www.flatoutbread.com/category/recipes/thin-crust-flatbread-artisan-pizza/

Grilled Chipotle London Broil Wrap

May 26, 2012 at 5:41 PM | Posted in BEEF, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Flatout Flatbread, leftovers, vegetables | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Grilled Chipotle London Broil Wrap

I used the leftover London Broil from the other day and I had the begining of some fantastic Wraps! I sliced the remaining London Broil into thin slices and wrapped them in paper towels and warmed them up in the microwave. For the Wrap I used Flatout Light Italian Flat bread. Love these they are 100% Whole Wheat , High Fiber, and only 90 calories and 16 carbs, I left the info and web link at the end of the post. I topped the Steak with JB’s Fat Boy Chipotle Sauce, sliced Deli Jalapenos, sliced Black Olives, Lettuce, Daisy Reduced Fat Sour Cream, fresh Grated Havarti Cheese and fresh grated Smoked Dutch Gouda. After assembling the wrap and folding it I put it in the microwave for 35 seconds. The lean and delicious Steak along with heat of the Jalapenos, Chipotle Sauce, and the fresh and creaminess of the Smoked Gouda Cheese and Havarti Cheese just makes an unbelievable Wrap! For dessert later a Mango-Cheesecake Parfait that I had made yesterday. You can find the recipe for this on an earlier post from today.

Flatout Light Italian Herb Flatbread

NEW Even Better Taste!
90 Calories
High Fiber
60% Less Net Carbs than sliced bread
100% WholeWheat
Low Fat
0g Sugar
The Best Life Diet Approved
Whole Grain approved, 8g or more per serving
INGREDIENTS: WATER, WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR, OAT FIBER, WHEAT GLUTEN, SOYBEAN OIL, contains less than 2% of each of the following: MALTITOL, WHEAT PROTEIN ISOLATE, SODIUM ACID PYROPHOSPHATE, BAKING SODA, YEAST, PRESERVATIVES (POTASSIUM SORBATE, SODIUM PROPIONATE, SORBIC ACID), FUMARIC ACID, WHEAT FLOUR, CELLULOSE GUM, GUAR GUM, CALCIUM SULFATE, XANTHAN GUM, SALT, ANNATTO COLOR, CALCIUM PEROXIDE, L-CYSTEINE, ENZYMES.CONTAINS: WHEAT AND SOYBEANS. MANUFACTURED IN A FACILITY THAT ALSO PROCESSES PRODUCTS CONTAINING MILK AND CHEESE.

Nutrition summary:
Calories 90
Fat 2.5g
Carbs 16g
Protein 9g

There are 90 calories in a 1 flatbread serving of Flatout Light Italian Herb Flatbread.
Calorie breakdown: 18% fat, 52% carbs, 30% protein

http://www.flatoutbread.com/

Hungry Girl 100% Whole Wheat w/Flax Foldit Flatbread

October 30, 2011 at 1:15 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Kraft Cheese | Leave a comment
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I am hopelessly addicted to pasta, bread, and rice. So I’m always looking for new and healthier products.
I found a new product, well new to me, called Hungry Girl Foldit Flatbread. There are different types and I tried the 100% Whole Wheat w/Flax Foldit Flatbread. You can put anything you want inside and then fold one end over, kind of like a taco shell but bread.  I made mine for lunch and put some Jennie – O Turkey Tenders I had left over from the other night and a half piece of Kraft 2% Deli Style Sliced Sharp Cheddar. I then warmed it up in my Panini Maker. Tasted fantastic and browned up beautifully! Another new product to keep on hand. One serving is one piece – 100 calories, 0 fat, 290 mg sodium, 19 g carbs, 3 g fiber, and 6 g protein.

Hungry Girl 100% Whole Wheat with Flax

90 Calories
Excellent Source of ALA Omega 3

Excellent Source of Fiber
43% Less Net Carbs than sliced bread
Tasty!
INGREDIENTS: WATER, WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR, VITAL WHEAT GLUTEN, OAT FIBER, GRAIN BLEND (CUT WHEAT, WHEAT BRAN, CUT RYE, CORN MEAL, BARLEY GRITS, BULGAR WHEAT, STEEL CUT OATS, OAT FLAKES, YELLOW CORN GRITS, BARLEY FLAKES, RYE CHOPS, HULLED MILLET, WHEAT FLAKES), FLAX SEED MEAL, SOYBEAN OIL, YEAST, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF EACH OF THE FOLLOWING: MALTITOL, SUGAR, MOLASSES, SODIUM ACID PYROPHOSPHATE, BAKING SODA, WHEAT PROTEIN ISOLATE, FUMARIC ACID, PRESERVATIVES (POTASSIUM SORBATE, SODIUM PROPIONATE), CELLULOSE GUM, GUAR GUM, CALCIUM SULFATE, XANTHAN GUM, SALT, L-CYSTEINE, CALCIUM PEROXIDE, ENZYMES. CONTAINS: WHEAT AND SOYBEANS. MANUFACTURED IN A FACILITY THAT ALSO PROCESSES PRODUCTS CONTAINING MILK AND CHEESE.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 flatbread (43g)

Amount Per Serving
Calories from Fat 25
Calories 90

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 2.5g     4%
Saturated Fat 0g     0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg     0%
Sodium 360mg     15%
Total Carbohydrate 15g     5%
Dietary Fiber 7g     28%
Sugars –
Protein 7g

Vitamin A –         Vitamin C –
Calcium –         Iron –
*    Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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