Healthy Overnight Oatmeal Recipes

February 17, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Overnight Oatmeal Recipes. Time saving and delicious Healthy Overnight Oatmeal Recipes with recipes like; Peanut Butter-Chocolate Chip Overnight Oats with Banana, Peanut Butter Protein Overnight Oats, and Savory Curry-Cashew Overnight Oats. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Overnight Oatmeal Recipes
Find healthy, delicious overnight oatmeal recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Peanut Butter-Chocolate Chip Overnight Oats with Banana
It takes just a few minutes to prepare these overnight oats and you will be all set with 4 packable healthy breakfasts to enjoy throughout the week. Use whatever milk you have on hand for this easy meal-prep breakfast recipe………..

Peanut Butter Protein Overnight Oats
Powdered peanut butter is a handy pantry staple that makes a great vegan protein booster for oatmeal and smoothies. Double or triple this recipe to meal-prep breakfasts for the week or to have breakfast ready for the entire family…….

Savory Curry-Cashew Overnight Oats
If you think oatmeal can only be sweet, this savory oats recipe will change your mind. Rich curry powder pairs perfectly with nutty cashews and sweet-tart raisins for a unique whole-grain breakfast (or dinner!)………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Overnight Oatmeal Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/21919/mealtimes/breakfast-brunch/cereals/oatmeal/overnight/

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Easy and Practical Tips for Counting Carbs Accurately

January 17, 2016 at 5:48 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website, Easy & Practical Tips for Counting Carbs Accurately. Here’s some great tips and advice on counting those carbs. Whether you eat at home or eating out, you’ll find some helpful tips to eat healthy! You can find all these tips along with all the healthy and delicious recipes at the Diabetic Living Online website. http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

Easy & Practical Tips for Counting Carbs AccuratelyDiabetic living logo

You can get better at nailing your carbohydrate counts when following a diabetic diet. Hone your carb-counting skills at home with these tried-and-true tips, then eat restaurant meals with confidence.

 

 

Count Carbs More Accurately

Count the grams of carbohydrate you eat. It’s not always a piece of cake (or pie), right? Fortunately, help is near. To dig up practical pointers, we’ve reached out to people with firsthand experience. Learn and more accurately estimate the carbohydrate in the foods you commonly eat and recipes you love with help from these tried-and-true tips for eating at home and dining out.
Eating In

The best place to practice your carb-counting skills is in the privacy of your home. This way you can feel comfortable learning the numbers, compiling your favorite foods, and taking time to improve your health. Slides 3-9 are tips from people who have learned to juggle the numbers at home. To skip to the tips for helping count carbs while eating out, go to Slides 10-16.
Estimate Portions at Home

Face it. You’ll have to do a lot of estimating. The better you train your eyes to estimate portions, the more precise you’ll be. Keep your eyes honest by double-checking your portions.

“Once a month I put my oatmeal, cold cereal, pasta, rice, and other starches I eat in my usual serving bowl or plate. But before I take a bite, I put it in a measuring cup to check up on my estimates,” says Amanda DiMatteo, PWD type 1. Amanda finds that without measuring tools, her portions grow.

 

* Click the link below to get all the Easy & Practical Tips for Counting Carbs Accurately

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/food-to-eat/count-carbs/easy-practical-tips-counting-carbs-accurately

One of America’s Favorites – Chocolate Chip Cookie

August 31, 2015 at 4:56 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Chocolate chip cookies

Chocolate chip cookies

A chocolate chip cookie is a drop cookie that originated in the United States and features chocolate chips as its distinguishing ingredient. The traditional recipe combines a dough composed of butter and both brown and white sugar with semi-sweet chocolate chips. Variations include recipes with other types of chocolate as well as additional ingredients such as nuts or oatmeal.

 
The chocolate chip cookie was invented by Ruth Graves Wakefield. She owned the Toll House Inn, in Whitman, Massachusetts, a very popular restaurant that featured home cooking in the 1930s. Her cookbook, Toll House Tried and True Recipes, was first published in 1936 by M. Barrows & Company, New York. The 1938 edition of the cookbook was the first to include the recipe “Toll House Chocolate Crunch Cookie” which rapidly became a favorite cookie in American homes.

 

 

Standard chocolate chip cookie ingredients

Standard chocolate chip cookie ingredients

Ruth Wakefield stated that she deliberately invented the cookie. She said, “We had been serving a thin butterscotch nut cookie with ice cream. Everybody seemed to love it, but I was trying to give them something different. So I came up with Toll House cookie.”

A different version of events says that Wakefield is said to have been making chocolate cookies and on running out of regular baker’s chocolate, substituted broken pieces of semi-sweet chocolate from Nestlé thinking that they would melt and mix into the batter. They did not and the chocolate chip cookie was born.

A still different history of the cookie derives from George Boucher, who was at one time head chef at the Toll House Inn, and his daughter, Carol Cavanagh, who also worked there. Contradicting Nestlé’s claim that Wakefield put chunks of chocolate into cookie dough hoping they would melt, the daughter stated that the owner, already an accomplished chef and author of a cookbook, knew enough about the properties of chocolate to realize it would not melt and mix into the batter while baking.

Boucher said that the vibrations from a large Hobart electric mixer dislodged bars of Nestlé’s chocolate stored on the shelf above the mixer which caused the chocolate to fall into the sugar cookie dough mixing below. He claims to have overcome Wakefield’s impulse to discard the dough as too badly ruined to waste effort baking them, leading to the discovery of the popular combination.

 

 

Every bag of Nestlé chocolate chips sold in North America has a variation (butter vs. margarine is now a stated option) of her original recipe printed on the back.

During WWII, US soldiers from Massachusetts who were stationed overseas shared the cookies they received in care packages from back home with soldiers from other parts of the US. Soon, hundreds of soldiers were writing home asking their families to send them some Toll House cookies, and Wakefield was soon inundated with letters from around the world asking for her recipe. Thus began the nationwide craze for the chocolate chip cookie.

 

 

Although the Nestlé’s Toll House recipe is widely known, every brand of chocolate chips, or “semi-sweet chocolate morsels” in Nestlé parlance, sold in the U.S. and Canada bears a variant of the chocolate chip cookie recipe on its packaging. Almost all baking-oriented cookbooks will contain at least one type of recipe.

Practically all commercial bakeries offer their own version of the cookie in packaged baked or ready-to-bake forms. There are at least three national (U.S./North America) chains that sell freshly baked chocolate chip cookies in shopping malls and standalone retail locations. Several businesses—including Doubletree hotels, Citibank, Aloha, and Midwest Airlines—offer freshly baked cookies to their patrons to differentiate themselves from their competition.

There is an urban legend about Neiman Marcus’ chocolate chip cookie recipe that has gathered a great deal of popularity over the years.

To honor the cookie’s creation in the state, on July 9, 1997, Massachusetts designated the chocolate chip cookie as the Official State Cookie, after it was proposed by a third-grade class from Somerset, Massachusetts.

 
Chocolate chip cookies are commonly made with white sugar; brown sugar; flour; a small portion of salt; eggs; a leavening agent such as baking powder; a fat, typically butter or shortening; vanilla extract; and semi-sweet chocolate pieces. Some recipes also include milk or nuts (such as chopped walnuts) in the dough.

Depending on the ratio of ingredients and mixing and cooking times, some recipes are optimized to produce a softer, chewy style cookie while others will produce a crunchy/crispy style. Regardless of ingredients, the procedure for making the cookie is fairly consistent in all recipes: First, the sugars and fat are creamed, usually with a wooden spoon or electric mixer. Next, the eggs and vanilla extract are added followed by the flour and leavening agent. Depending on the additional flavoring, its addition to the mix will be determined by the type used: peanut butter will be added with the wet ingredients while cocoa powder would be added with the dry ingredients. The titular ingredient, chocolate chips, as well as nuts are typically mixed in towards the end of the process to minimize breakage, just before the cookies are scooped and positioned on a cookie sheet. Most cookie dough is baked, although some eat the dough as is, or use it as an addition to vanilla ice cream to make chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream.

 

 

Chocolate chip bar cookies

Chocolate chip bar cookies

Common variants
* The M&M cookie, or party cookie, replaces the chocolate chips with M&M’s. This recipe originally used shortening as the fat, but has been updated to use butter.
* The chocolate chocolate chip cookie uses a dough that is chocolate flavored by the addition of cocoa or melted chocolate. Variations on this cookie include replacing chocolate chips with white chocolate or peanut butter chips.
* The macadamia chip cookie has macadamia nuts and white chocolate chips. It is a signature cookie of Mrs. Fields bakeries.
* The chocolate chip peanut butter cookie replaces the vanilla flavored dough with a peanut butter flavored one.
* Chocolate chip cookie dough baked in a baking dish instead of a cookie sheet results in a chocolate chip bar cookie.
* Other variations include different sizes and shapes of chocolate chips, as well as dark or milk chocolate chips. These changes lead to differences in both flavor and texture.
Popular brands
* Blue Chip Cookies
* Chips Ahoy! (Nabisco)
* Chips Deluxe (Keebler)
* Cookie Time
* The Decadent (Loblaw)
* Famous Amos
* Maryland Cookies
* Mrs. Fields
* Otis Spunkmeyer
* Pepperidge Farm

 

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