Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes

September 18, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is a Twice-Baked Sweet Potato. These Delicious Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes are made using Sweet Potatoes, Reduced Calorie Margarine, Brown Sugar Substitute, Ground Cinnamon, Allspice, Nutmeg, Crushed Pineapple, Walnuts, and Mini Marshmallows. These are some kicked up Sweet Taters! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes
Put the fall’s harvest to good use with this classic side dish. With its combination of cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, chopped walnuts, and miniature marshmallows, this casserole is so delightful, you won’t even need dessert.

Ingredients
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Baking time: approximately 1 hour and 10 minutes
Cooling time: 15 minutes

4 sweet potatoes (8 ounces each), unpeeled
1 tablespoon reduced-calorie margarine
1/2 teaspoon brown sugar substitute
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 can (8 ounces) crushed pineapple, canned in juice
2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
I cup miniature marshmallows

Directions
Yield: 8 stuffed potato halves
Serving size: 1 stuffed potato half

1 – Preheat oven to 400˚F. Wrap each sweet potato in foil, place on oven rack, and bake for one hour, or until tender when pierced with a fork. Remove from oven and allow to cool 15 minutes. Cut each potato in half lengthwise and carefully scoop flesh into a bowl, leaving shells intact with 1/8–1/4 inch of flesh. Place shells in a baking dish and set aside. Using an electric mixer, mash flesh until smooth. Mix in margarine, brown sugar substitute, and spices. Drain pineapple well in a sieve, forcing out extra liquid with the back of a spoon. Stir drained pineapple into mashed sweet potatoes. Spoon filling into shells; sprinkle with walnuts and press on marshmallows. Return to the oven for 8–10 minutes, or until marshmallows are lightly toasted and potato is heated through.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 174 calories, Carbohydrates: 36 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: <1 g, Sodium: 37 mg, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/twice-baked-sweet-potatoes/

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Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Creamy Baked Custard with Maple Syrup

January 20, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is a Creamy Baked Custard with Maple Syrup. To make this week’s Dessert you’ll be needing Fat-Free Half-and-Half, Egg Substitute, Sugar, Vanilla, Nutmeg, and Maple Syrup. This Dessert is only 131 calories, 23 carbs, and 1 gram of fat per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Creamy Baked Custard with Maple Syrup
When you’re craving a guilt-free sweet treat, dig into this creamy custard. Containing only 131 calories and 1 gram of fat, this delectable dessert only tastes sinful — so go ahead and indulge yourself tonight.

Ingredients
2 1/2 cups fat-free half-and-half
1/2 cup cholesterol-free egg substitute
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla
Dash ground nutmeg
3 cups boiling water
2 tablespoons maple syrup

Directions
Yield: 6 servings.
Serving size: 6 ounces.

1 – Preheat oven to 325°F. Lightly spray 6 custard cups or ramekins with nonstick cooking spray.

2 – Combine half-and-half, egg substitute, sugar, vanilla, and nutmeg in large bowl. Pour into prepared custard cups.

3 – Pour boiling water into 13×9-inch baking dish. Place custard cups in dish. Bake 1 hour and 15 minutes. (Centers will not be completely set.) Remove cups from pan. Cool completely on wire rack. Cover with plastic wrap; refrigerate overnight.

4 – Drizzle with maple syrup before serving.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 131 calories, Carbohydrates: 23 g, Protein: 5 g, Fat: 1 g, Saturated Fat: 0 g, Cholesterol: 17 mg, Sodium: 139 mg, Fiber: 0 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/creamy-baked-custard-with-maple-syrup/

 

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Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – CANDIED YAMS

January 9, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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Diabetic Dish of the Week – CANDIED YAMS TUESDAY

This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is – CANDIED YAMS. Here’s another Delicious Diabetic Side Dish, CANDIED YAMS. Yams, Brown Sugar, Raisins, Cinnamon, Cloves, Sugar Substitute, Low Calorie Margarine and Nutmeg make up this week’s Dish! So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

CANDIED YAMS
Serving size: 1/4 cup Recipe for Candied Yams from our Side Dishes recipe section.

Ingredients

6 medium yams, boiled in skin until tender (about 20 – 30 minutes)
1/3 cup raisins*
1 Tbsp brown sugar
3 Tbsp sugar substitute
2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
Ground cloves to taste
1/3 cup low-calorie margarine
1 cup cold water

Directions

1 – Preheat the oven to 350F.

2 – Cool yams, peel, and slice lengthwise.

3 – Place the yam slices in a covered baking dish. 4 – Sprinkle the raisins over the yams.

5 – In a separate bowl, mix the brown sugar, sugar substitute, and spices; sprinkle over the yams. Dot with margarine and add water.

6 – Cover the baking dish and bake for 30 minutes.

7 – Remove the cover, then bake another 15 – 20 minutes.

* Note: If you leave out the raisins, it reduces the nutritional information by these amounts: 3.2g carbohydrate; 2.4 g sugars; 12 calories; Fiber 0.2g.

Recipe Yield: 12 servings

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 81
Fat: 3 grams
Sodium: 63 milligrams
Protein: 1 grams
Carbohydrates: 14 grams

Recipe Yield: 12 servings

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 81
Fat: 3 grams
Sodium: 63 milligrams
Protein: 1 grams
Carbohydrates: 14 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipe/candied-yams

Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread

December 28, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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Here’s a recipe for Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread. What better Dessert for the Fall/Winter Seasons than a Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread! This Diabetic Friendly Dessert Recipe is only 142 calories and 9 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread
With only 142 calories and 10 grams of carbohydrate per serving, this scrumptious, low-carb bread is the perfect way to end your hectic day. Curl up on the couch and enjoy with a mug of tea or cocoa for a relaxing treat.

Preparation time: 10 minutes. Baking time: 50 minutes.

Ingredients
Nonstick cooking spray
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granular
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup pumpkin puree
1/2 cup canola oil
1 whole egg
1 egg white
1/3 cup water
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon allspice

Directions
Yield: 10 servings.
Serving size: 1/10th of a loaf.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray a 9″ x 5″ x 3″ loaf pan with nonstick cooking spray. In a large mixing bowl, combine all ingredients in the order listed, stirring after each addition. Stir only enough to combine ingredients into a smooth batter. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 45–50 minutes, until a cake tester inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 142 calories, Carbohydrates: 10 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 10 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 21 mg, Sodium: 292 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/snack/whole-wheat-pumpkin-bread/

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* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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Make-Ahead Mashed Sweet Potatoes

December 10, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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I have a recipe for Make-Ahead Mashed Sweet Potatoes. It’s from the Jennie – O website, they have many Side Dishes and Dessert Recipes on their website along with all the Turkey Recipes. To make this recipe you’ll be needing Sweet Potatoes, Butter, Sugar, Maple Syrup, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Kosher Salt, and Vanilla Extract. You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Stay Safe and Make the SWITCH in 2021! https://www.jennieo.com/

Make-Ahead Mashed Sweet Potatoes
Make-Ahead Mashed Sweet Potatoes are a classic holiday side that can be prepared up to two days prior to your holiday meal. Six servings of sweet potatoes, mashed and baked with cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla and maple syrup.

Total Time – 2 Hours
Serving Size – 6 Servings

Ingredients
3 – pounds sweet potato
2 – tablespoons butter
1/3 – cup sugar
1/4 – cup maple syrup
1/2 – teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 – teaspoon nutmeg
1 – teaspoon kosher salt
1 – teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions
1) Heat oven to 400°F.
2) Place sweet potatoes on baking sheet.
3) Bake 55 minutes or until tender.
4) Let stand 5 minutes; scoop pulp into large bowl.
5) Mash with potato masher or process through a ricer until smooth.
6) Stir butter, sugar, maple syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt and vanilla into sweet potatoes.
7) Place in lightly greased, 2-quart baking dish.
8) Bake 30 minutes or until bubbly.
9) Bake and mash these potatoes up to two-days prior to Thanksgiving.)
10) Then, day-of, simply stir in seasonings and bake for 30 minutes or until bubbly.

Nutrition
Calories – 300
Protein – 5g
Carbohydrates – 67g
Fiber – 8g
Sugars – 34g
Fat – 3g
Cholesterol – 5mg
Sodium – 430mg
Saturated Fat – 1.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/make-ahead-mashed-sweet-potatoes/

Sweet Whipped Turnips

November 7, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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I have a recipe for Sweet Whipped Turnips. These are made using Turnips, Carrots, Apple, Water, Low Calorie Margarine, Skim Milk, Splenda Brown Sugar, Nutmeg, Ground Pepper, and Salt. One delicious Side Dish and it’s only 94 calories and 13 net carbs. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Sweet Whipped Turnips
Apples, nutmeg, and a bit of brown sugar blend give this whipped root vegetable mixture delightfully sweet undertones!

Ingredients
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 30 minutes.

1 pound turnips
1 pound carrots
1 apple, about 3 inches in diameter
6 cups water
2 tablespoons low-calorie margarine
1/3 cup skim milk
2 tablespoons Splenda Brown Sugar Blend
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
Dash salt

Directions
Yield: 6 servings
Serving size: 1/2 cup

1 – Peel turnips and carrots and chop into chunks. Peel and core apple and chop into chunks. Place turnip, carrot, and apple chunks in a 3-quart saucepan. Add 6 cups water and bring to a boil. After boil is reached, reduce heat to medium and cook for 30 minutes or until all pieces are tender. Remove from heat, pour into a colander and let drain completely. Place turnip, carrot, and apple mixture in a food processor (or use handheld mixer and large bowl), combine with all remaining ingredients, and whip until desired consistency (add additional tablespoon of milk if desired).

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 94 calories, Carbohydrates: 17 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 2g, Saturated Fat: <1 g, Cholesterol: <1 mg, Sodium: 180 mg, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/sweet-whipped-turnips/

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Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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One of America’s Favorites – Pumpkin Pie

October 4, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A slice of pumpkin pie

Pumpkin pie is a dessert pie with a spiced, pumpkin-based custard filling, though other types of squash are more commonly utilized. The pumpkin is a symbol of harvest time, and pumpkin pie is generally eaten during the fall and early winter. In the United States and Canada, it is usually prepared for Thanksgiving, and other occasions when pumpkin is in season.

The pie filling ranges in color from orange to brown and is baked in a single pie shell, rarely with a top crust. The pie is generally flavored with cinnamon, powdered ginger, nutmeg, and cloves. Allspice is also commonly used and can replace the clove and nutmeg, as its flavor is similar to both combined. Cardamom and vanilla are also sometimes used as batter spices. The spice mixture is called pumpkin pie spice.

The pie is often made from canned pumpkin or packaged pumpkin pie filling (spices included), mainly from varieties of Cucurbita moschata.

Pies made from pumpkins use pie pumpkins which measure about 15 to 20 centimetres (6 to 8 inches) in diameter. They are considerably smaller than jack o’lanterns. The first step for getting the edible part out of the pumpkin is to slice it in half and remove the seeds. The two halves are heated until soft, in an oven, over an open fire, on a stove top, or in a microwave oven. Sometimes the pumpkin halves are brined to soften the pulp instead of being cooked. At this point, the pulp is scooped out and puréed.[citation needed]

The pulp is mixed with eggs, evaporated and/or sweetened condensed milk, sugar, and a spice mixture called pumpkin pie spice, which includes nutmeg and other spices (e.g., ginger, cinnamon, cloves, allspice, mace), then baked in a pie shell. Similar pies are made with butternut squash or sweet potato fillings.

Pumpkin pie filling being made

The pumpkin is native to the continent of North America. The pumpkin was an early export to France; from there it was introduced to Tudor England, and the flesh of the “pompion” was quickly accepted as pie filler. During the seventeenth century, pumpkin pie recipes could be found in English cookbooks, such as Hannah Woolley’s The Gentlewoman’s Companion (1675). Pumpkin “pies” made by early American colonists were more likely to be a savory soup made and served in a pumpkin than a sweet custard in a crust.

It was not until the early nineteenth century that the recipes appeared in Canadian and American cookbooks or pumpkin pie became a common addition to the Thanksgiving dinner. The Pilgrims brought the pumpkin pie back to New England, while the English method of cooking the pumpkin took a different course. In the 19th century, the English pumpkin pie was prepared by stuffing the pumpkin with apples, spices, and sugar and then baking it whole. In the United States after the Civil War, the pumpkin pie was resisted in southern states as a symbol of Yankee culture imposed on the south, where there was no tradition of eating pumpkin pie. Many southern cooks instead made sweet potato pie, or added bourbon and pecans to give a southern touch.

Today, throughout much of Canada and the United States, it is traditional to serve pumpkin pie after Thanksgiving dinner. Additionally, many modern companies produce seasonal pumpkin pie-flavored products such as candy, cheesecake, coffee, ice cream, french toast, waffles and pancakes, and many breweries produce a seasonal pumpkin ale or beer; these are generally not flavored with pumpkins, but rather pumpkin pie spices. Commercially made pumpkin pie mix is made from Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbita maxima, and Cucurbita moschata. (Libby Select uses the Select Dickinson Pumpkin variety of C. moschata for its canned pumpkins.)

Pumpkin pies were briefly discouraged from Thanksgiving dinners in 1947 as part of a rationing campaign, mainly because of the eggs in the recipe.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 15, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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And now a word on Nutmeg………………

Nutmeg is found to have health benefits, including its ability to relieve pain, soothe indigestion, strengthen cognitive function, detoxify the body, boost skin health, alleviate oral conditions, reduce insomnia, increase immune system function, and prevent leukemia, and improve blood circulation.

Researchers have discovered that cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, and other spices that we mix into baked goods and savory dishes contain nutrients that sharpen memory, reduce stress, or improve sleep, among other benefits. Spice it up!

Winter Squash Soup with Dill

November 8, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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I have a Soup Recipe to pass along, Winter Squash Soup with Dill. This one is made using Winter Squash (acorn, butternut, or Hubbard squash), White Onion, Light Margarine, All Purpose Flour, 99% Fat-Free Chicken Broth, Skim Milk, Dill, Thyme Leaves, and Nutmeg. The Soup is 113 calories and 12 net carbs per serving. The recipe is also from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Winter Squash Soup with Dill
Try a steaming bowl of this vitamin-rich soup to warm up on these long winter nights!

Ingredients
Cooking time: 20 minutes.
Baking time: 45 minutes

1 1/2 cups cooked, mashed winter squash (from 1 1/2 pounds acorn, butternut, or Hubbard squash)
1 small white onion, finely chopped
2 tablespoons light margarine
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
2 cups of 99% fat-free chicken broth
1/4 cup skim milk
1 teaspoon dill
1/2 teaspoon thyme leaves
Dash nutmeg

Directions
Yield: 4 servings
Serving size: 1 cup

1 – To cook squash, preheat oven to 350°F. Split squash in half lengthwise, and remove seeds and strings with a spoon. Place it in a shallow baking pan with 1 inch of water and bake for about 45 minutes, until soft. When soft, scoop flesh from skin and mash with a fork or potato masher.

2 – In a medium saucepan, sauté onion with margarine. Add flour when onions soften. Slowly add chicken broth a few ounces at a time, stirring constantly. Bring to a gentle boil. Lower heat and gradually stir in milk and mashed squash. Add seasonings. Simmer for 10 minutes, stirring frequently.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 113 calories, Carbohydrates: 15 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 5 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 508 mg (using low-sodium broth will reduce sodium), Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/winter-squash-soup-with-dill/

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Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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One of America’s Favorites – Custard Pie

November 2, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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Custard pie – A coconut cream pie

A custard pie is any type of uncooked custard mixture added to an uncooked or partially cooked crust and baked together. In North America, custard pie commonly refers to a plain mixture of milk, eggs, sugar, salt, vanilla extract and sometimes nutmeg combined with a pie crust. It is distinctly different from a cream pie, which contains cooked custard poured into a cooled, precooked crust. In the United Kingdom, the comical or political act of pieing is conventionally done with a “custard pie”. Some common custard pies include pumpkin pie, lemon and buttermilk chess pie, coconut cream pie, and buko pie. True custard is defined as a liquid thickened with eggs. Due to the often large number of whole eggs in custard pie it is a very rich pie.

The Ancient Romans were the first to understand the binding properties of eggs. During the Middle Ages, the first custard pies, as we know them, began to appear. Initially, custards were used only as fillings for pies, pastries and tarts. Both Europe and Asia had recipes that contained custards. The word custard is derived from ‘crustade’ which is a tart with a crust. After the 16th century, custards began to be used in individual dishes rather than as a filling in crusts.

Today, custards are used as filling in pies and tarts, and as individual dishes. Ideally a custard pie should be light and delicate, but still have good body. Custards can be made in two ways: baked or stirred upon the stove, but most custard pie recipes call for baking. The eggs in custard mixtures, when cooked, turn from liquid to solid. If cooked over excessive heat, the eggs will curdle, which is extremely undesirable. Curdling can be prevented by using lower temperatures and stirring. As such, making true custard pie is a very delicate process.

A slice of pear custard pie

Savory pies with meat fillings were far more common than sweet pies in the Cuisine of the Thirteen Colonies. Sweet pies, when they were available, were made with a simple custard base of fresh milk, sugar and eggs. Some of these traditional pies like buttermilk pie, almond custard, Irish potato pie and bean pie (associated with the Nation of Islam) are uncommon in modern times.

 

 

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