February 5th, 2020 – WORLD NUTELLA DAY

February 5, 2020 at 12:13 PM | Posted in Food | 5 Comments
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WORLD NUTELLA DAY 2/5/2020

World Nutella Day celebrates what happens when hazelnuts and chocolate collide. For example, millions of people celebrating all on February 5th each year!

It is often said that necessity is the mother of invention. Adding hazelnuts when cocoa is hard to come by may have been an Italian trick during hard times. In the 1800s, in the northern Italian city of Piedmont, they made a paste of chocolate and hazelnuts at a time when the nuts were abundant, but the cocoa was not.

At the end of World War II, cocoa was once again difficult to come by. Pastry Maker, Pietro Ferrero, made loaves of this sweet paste and called it Giandujot. Soon after, the Ferrero Company was founded on May 14, 1946.

It wasn’t until 1951 that Ferrero made the paste into a spreadable form. We wouldn’t even recognize the spread by name until 1964 when Ferrero’s son Michele gave the jar of creamy hazelnut and cocoa the name Nutella.

One of America’s Favorites – Crêpe

January 28, 2013 at 10:48 AM | Posted in cooking, Food | 5 Comments
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A crêpe or crepe is a type of very thin pancake, usually made from wheat flour (crêpes de Froment) or buckwheat flour (galettes). The word is of French origin, deriving from the Latin crispa, meaning “curled”. While crêpes originate from Brittany, a region in the northwest of France, their consumption is widespread in France and Quebec. In Brittany, crêpes are traditionally served with cider. Crêpes are served with a variety of fillings, from the most simple with only sugar to flambéed crêpes Suzette or elaborate savoury fillings.
Crêpes are made by pouring a thin liquid batter onto a hot frying pan or flat circular hot plate, often with a trace of butter on the pan’s

A stack of crêpes

A stack of crêpes

surface. The batter is spread evenly over the cooking surface of the pan or plate either by tilting the pan or by distributing the batter with an offset spatula. There are also specially designed crêpe makers with a heatable circular surface that can be dipped in the batter and quickly pulled out to produce an ideal thickness and evenness of cooking.
Common savoury fillings for crêpes served for lunch or dinner are cheese, ham, and eggs, ratatouille, mushrooms, artichoke (in certain regions), and various meat products.
When sweet, they can be eaten as part of breakfast or as a dessert. They can be filled and topped with various sweet toppings, often including Nutella spread, preserves, sugar (granulated or powdered), maple syrup, lemon juice, whipped cream, fruit spreads, custard, and sliced soft fruits or confiture.
Crêpes are especially popular throughout France. The common ingredients include flour, eggs, milk, butter, and a pinch of salt. Crêpes are usually of two types: sweet crêpes (crêpes sucrées) made with wheat flour and slightly sweetened; and savoury galettes (crêpes salées) made with buckwheat flour and unsweetened. The name “galette” came from the French word galet (“pebble”), since the first gallettes were made on a large pebble heated in a fire. Batter made from buckwheat flour is gluten-free, which makes it possible for people who have a gluten allergy or intolerance to eat this type of crêpe.
Mille crêpe is a French cake made of many crêpe layers. The word mille means “a thousand”, implying the many layers of crêpe.
Chocolate-Coconut Crêpe served in crêperie near the Patheon in Paris, France
Another standard French and Belgian crêpe is the crêpe Suzette, a crêpe with lightly grated orange peel and liqueur (usually Grand Marnier) which is subsequently lit upon presentation.
Cherry Kijafa Crêpes are also often common and are made with a traditional crêpe base, but filled with cherries simmered in a Kijafa wine sauce.
Crêpe dentelle is a crispy biscuit made with a very thin layer of crêpe folded in a cigar shape and then baked. It is usually enjoyed with a hot drink during the Goûter, or Afternoon Tea, in France.
A crêperie may be a takeaway restaurant or stall, serving crêpes as a form of fast food or street food, or may be a more formal sit-down restaurant or café.
Crêperies are typical of Brittany in France; however, crêperies can be found throughout France and in many other countries.
Because a crêpe may be served as both a main meal or a dessert, crêperies may be quite diverse in their selection and may offer other baked goods such as baguettes. They may also serve coffee, tea, buttermilk and cider (a popular drink to accompany crêpes).
In Swedish, a crêpe is called pannkaka, and in Danish, pandekage (“pancake”); in Dutch it is a pannenkoek or flensje, and in Afrikaans a

A sweet crêpe served with strawberries and whipped cream

A sweet crêpe served with strawberries and whipped cream

pannekoek, which is usually served with cinnamon sugar. In Italy, crêpes are called crespella. In the Spanish regions of Galicia and Asturias they are traditionally served at carnivals. In Galicia they’re called filloas, and may also be made with pork blood instead of milk. In Asturias they are called fayueles or frixuelos, and in Turkey, “Akıtma”.
In areas of Eastern Europe formerly belonging to the Austro-Hungarian empire, there is a thin pancake comparable[clarification needed] to a crêpe that in Austro-Bavarian is called Palatschinken or Omletten; in Hungarian: palacsinta; and in Bosnian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Montenegrin, Czech, Croatian and Slovene: palačinka; in Slovak: palacinka. In the Balkan region such as the countries of Albania, Bosnia, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia, palačinka or palaçinka may be eaten with fruit jam, quark cheese, sugar, honey, or the hazelnut-chocolate cream Nutella. In Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine, there is a similar dish known as the blintz. The Oxford English Dictionary derives the German and Slavic words from the Hungarians palacsinta, which it derives from the Romanian plăcintă (“pie, pancake”), which comes in turn from classical Latin placenta (“small flat cake”). In Chile and Argentina they are called panqueques and are often eaten with dulce de leche (known in English as “milk caramel”).
Crêpes have also become popular in Japan, with sweet and savoury varieties being sold at many small stands, usually called crêperies. They have also become popular in North America with several crêpe franchises opening. Typically, these franchises stick to the traditional French method of making crêpes but they have also put their own spin on the crêpe with new types such as the hamburger and pizza crêpe.
In addition to crêperies and crêpe franchises, there are crêpe manufacturers that use modern equipment to produce crêpes in bulk. Crepini, a crêpe producer based in Brooklyn, New York, makes a variety of Naked and filled crêpes that are sold by local retailers, major supermarket chains, and food service providers throughout North America and Canada.
In France, crêpes are traditionally served on Candlemas (La Chandeleur), February 2. This day was originally Virgin Mary’s Blessing Day, but became known in France as “Le Jour des Crêpes” (literally translated “The Day of [the] Crêpes”, but sometimes given colloquially as “Avec Crêpe Day” or “National Crêpe Day”), referring to the tradition of offering crêpes. The belief was that if you could catch the crêpe with a frying pan after tossing it in the air with your right hand and holding a gold coin in your left hand, you would become rich that year.

 

 
Basic Crepes

INGREDIENTS:
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 eggs
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup water
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons butter, melted
DIRECTIONS:
1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour and the eggs. Gradually add in the milk and water, stirring to combine. Add the salt and butter; beat until smooth.
2. Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each crepe. Tilt the pan with a circular motion so that the batter coats the surface evenly.
3. Cook the crepe for about 2 minutes, until the bottom is light brown. Loosen with a spatula, turn and cook the other side. Serve hot.

*Makes 4 servings

My Weakness Jif Peanut Butter!

March 8, 2012 at 11:34 AM | Posted in snacks | 1 Comment
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A little history on my favorite snack maker!

In 1958, original Jif® Creamy Peanut Butter was introduced, and quickly became a favorite. Moms recognized Jif peanut butter‘s superior fresh-roasted peanut taste and made Jif peanut butter a delicious addition to recipes for every meal.

Jif has introduced several new varieties over the years. In 1974, Jif Extra Crunchy peanut butter made its debut and proved to be a success with adults and children alike. In 1991, we introduced Simply Jif peanut butter, our product with low-sodium and less sugar than regular peanut butter. Shortly after, we responded to the demand for a reduced fat product with delicious fresh-roasted peanut taste with the launch of Jif Reduced Fat peanut butter spread. In 2004, the sweet combination of peanut butter and honey made its way into the Jif portfolio as Jif with Honey was debuted. Jif Natural peanut butter spread was launched in 2009. It is made from five simple ingredients and is now offered in both creamy and crunchy varieties. Soon after, Jif Omega-3 peanut butter was launched with the same great taste as regular Jif peanut butter. Jif Omega-3 peanut butter is an excellent source of Omega-3 DHA & EPA combined per serving. Most recently, Jif has made it easy to take the peanuttiest peanut butter with you anywhere with Jif To Go™, the perfect portable snack.

http://www.jif.com/

Nut of the Week – Hazelnut

January 30, 2012 at 11:38 AM | Posted in diabetes, Food, nuts | 2 Comments
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A hazelnut is the nut of the hazel and is also known as a cob nut or filbert nut according to species. A cob is roughly spherical to oval,

Hazelnuts, with shell (left), without shell (right)

about 15–25 mm long and 10–15 mm in diameter, with an outer fibrous husk surrounding a smooth shell. A filbert is more elongated, being about twice as long as it is round. The nut falls out of the husk when ripe, about seven to eight months after pollination. The kernel of the seed is edible and used raw or roasted, or ground into a paste. Hazelnuts are also used for livestock feed, as are chestnuts and acorns. The seed has a thin dark brown skin, which is sometimes removed before cooking.

Hazelnuts are produced in commercial quantities in Turkey, Italy, Greece and in the American states of Oregon and Washington. Turkey is, by far, the largest producer of hazelnuts in the world.

Hazelnuts are used in confectionery to make praline, and also used in combination with chocolate for chocolate truffles and products such as Nutella. Hazelnut oil, pressed from hazelnuts, is strongly flavoured and used as a cooking oil.

Hazelnuts are rich in protein and unsaturated fat. Moreover, they contain significant amounts of thiamine and vitamin B6, as well as smaller amounts of other B vitamins.

Common hazel is widely cultivated for its nuts, including in commercial orchards in Europe, Turkey, Iran and the Caucasus. The name “hazelnut” applies to the nuts of any of the species of the genus Corylus. This hazelnut, the kernel of the seed, is edible and used raw or roasted, or ground into a paste. The seed has a thin dark brown skin, which has a bitter flavour and is sometimes removed before cooking. The top producer of hazelnuts, by a large margin, is Turkey, specifically the Ordu Province. Turkish hazelnut production of 625,000 tonnes accounts for approximately 75% of worldwide production.

In North America: in the United States, hazelnut production is concentrated in Oregon; they are also grown extensively just to the north, in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada. In 1996, the in-shell production in Oregon was about 19,900 tons, compared to 100 tons in Washington. Hazelnuts are also found in the Pangi valley of Chamba district in India, where they are known as thangi. The hazelnut is growing in popularity in the U.S., where the Hazelnut Marketing Board was established in 1949 by Federal Hazelnut Marketing Order section 982. The harvesting of hazelnuts is done either by hand or by manual or mechanical raking of fallen nuts.

There are many cultivars of the hazel, including ‘Barcelona’, ‘Butler’, ‘Casina’, ‘Clark’ ‘Cosford’, ‘Daviana’, ‘Delle Langhe’, ‘England’, ‘Ennis’, ‘Fillbert’, ‘Halls Giant’, ‘Jemtegaard’, ‘Kent Cob’, ‘Lewis’, ‘Tokolyi’, ‘Tonda Gentile’, ‘Tonda di Giffoni’, ‘Tonda Romana’, ‘Wanliss Pride’, and ‘Willamette’. Some of these are grown for specific qualities of the nut; these qualities include large nut size and early and late fruiting cultivars, whereas others are grown as pollinators. The majority of commercial hazelnuts are propagated from root sprouts. Some cultivars are of hybrid origin between common hazel and filbert. One cultivar grown in Washington state, the “DuChilly”, has an elongated appearance, a thinner and less bitter skin, and a distinctly sweeter flavor than other varieties.

Hazelnuts are harvested annually in mid-autumn. As autumn comes to a close, the trees drop their nuts and leaves. Most commercial growers wait for the nuts to drop on their own, rather than use equipment to shake them from the tree.

Hazelnuts are used in confectionery to make some pralines, in chocolate for some chocolate truffles, and in some hazelnut paste products (such as Nutella). In the United States, hazelnut butter is being promoted as a more nutritious spread than its peanut butter

Bowl of hazelnuts

counterpart, though it has a higher fat content. In Austria and especially in Vienna, hazelnut paste is an ingredient in the making of tortes (such as Viennese hazelnut torte) which are famous there. In the Kiev cake hazelnut flour is used to flavor its meringue body and crushed hazelnuts are sprinkled over its sides. Hazelnuts are also the main ingredient of the classic Dacquoise liqueur. Hazelnut liqueurs, such as Frangelico, are Vodka-based.

Hazelnut-flavored coffee seems (to many users) to be slightly sweetened and less acidic, even though the nut is low in natural saccharides. The reason for such perception is not yet understood.

In Australia, over 2,000 tons are imported annually, mostly to supply the demand from the Cadbury company. Hazelnut oil, pressed from hazelnuts, is strongly flavored and used as a cooking oil. Hazelnuts are also grown extensively in Australia, in orchards growing varieties mostly imported from Europe. It is also grown in New Zealand and Chile.

Common hazel is used by a number of species of Lepidoptera as a food plant.

Hazelnuts have a significant place among the types of dried nuts in terms of nutrition and health because of the special composition of fats (primarily oleic acid), protein, carbohydrates, vitamins (vitamin E), minerals, dietary fibres, phytosterol (beta-cytosterol) and antioxidant phenolics such as flavan-3-ols.

Summertime Diabetic Recipes

August 2, 2011 at 12:37 PM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, grilling, low calorie, low carb | 2 Comments
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One diabetic recipe for the grill and a quick and easy diabetic dessert to go with it! From the http://www.delish.com/  web site which is full of great diabetic recipes!

Steak and Potato Kebabs with Creamy Cilantro Sauce

From EatingWell.com
Steak kebabs get a Southwestern spin with poblano peppers and a creamy sauce spiked with cilantro, chile powder, cumin, and vinegar. The potatoes are partially cooked in the microwave before putting them on the grill so they’re done at the same time as faster-cooking steak, peppers, and onions. Serve with green salad and Spanish rice.

Ingredients

* 1/2 cup(s) packed fresh cilantro leaves, minced
* 2 tablespoon(s) red-wine vinegar or cider vinegar
* 2 tablespoon(s) reduced-fat sour cream
* 1 clove(s) (small) garlic, minced
* 1 teaspoon(s) chile powder
* 1/2 teaspoon(s) ground cumin
* 1/2 teaspoon(s) salt, divided
* 8  new or baby red potatoes
* 1 1/4 pound(s) strip steak, trimmed and cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
* 2  poblano peppers or 1 large green bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces
* 1 teaspoon(s) extra-virgin olive oil
* 1 large sweet onion, cut into 1-inch chunks

Directions

1. Combine cilantro, vinegar, sour cream, garlic, chile powder, cumin, and 1/4 teaspoon salt in a small bowl. Set aside.
2. Preheat grill to high.
3. Place potatoes in a microwave-safe container. Cover and microwave on High until just tender when pierced with a fork, 3 to 3 1/2 minutes.
4. Toss the potatoes, steak, and pepper pieces with oil and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt in a large bowl. Thread the potatoes, steak, peppers, and onion chunks onto 8 skewers. Grill, turning once or twice, until the steak reaches desired doneness, about 6 minutes for medium. Serve the kebabs with the reserved sauce.

Nutritional Information
(per serving)
Calories    271
Total Fat    9g
Saturated Fat    3g
Cholesterol    65mg
Sodium    368mg
Total Carbohydrate    17g
Dietary Fiber    2g
Sugars    —
Protein    30g

Chocolate-Banana Grahams

From EatingWell.com
A graham cracker smeared with Nutella and topped with banana and coconut is a light way to satisfy your sweet tooth.

Ingredients

* 1  graham cracker, broken into 2 rectangles
* 1/2 teaspoon(s) Nutella or other chocolate-hazelnut spread, divided
* 2 slice(s) banana, about 2 inches long
* 1/2 teaspoon(s) sweetened shredded coconut, toasted if desired, divided

Directions

1. Spread each graham cracker piece with 1/4 teaspoon Nutella and top with a slice of banana and a sprinkling of coconut.

Nutritional Information
(per serving)
Calories    71
Total Fat    2g
Saturated Fat    —
Cholesterol    —
Sodium    46mg
Total Carbohydrate    13g

http://www.delish.com/

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