Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Carpetbag Steaks

December 26, 2013 at 9:41 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

I had never heard of this one but what a great combo, Buffalo Steak and Oysters! This recipe, from Jill O’Brien, is from 2011 and is this weeks Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Carpetbag Steaks.

 
December 9, 2011
Carpetbag Steaks
By: Jill O’Brien

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Carpetbag Steaks

Carpetbag Steaks (serves 4)

* Tenderloin or New York steaks work well for this dish.

Ingredients:

For Steaks:

4 Buffalo Steaks, rinsed and patted dry
1 tablespoon olive oil
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon pepper
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
8 fresh oysters, shucked and coarsely chopped
2 tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon
2 tablespoons shallots, minced
½ teaspoon Tabasco sauce
½ cup parmesan, grated
½ cup dry bread crumbs
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
For Cajun Cream Sauce

1 tablespoon butter
2 teaspoons Cajun seasonings + to taste
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
½ cup cream
Cajun Seasoning:

4 teaspoons paprika
1 teaspoon each: cayenne, black pepper, salt, onion powder, garlic powder, and thyme
Mix together and set aside. Keep remaining in sealed container.

 
Directions:

* Prep steaks as above. Make a slit in center of the steak creating a pocket. Rub steaks with olive oil, salt and pepper. Allow to rest at room temperature for 2 hours.
* Place oysters and lemon juice in bowl and let set for ½ hour.
* Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in sauté pan over medium high heat.
* Add shallots, drained prepped oysters and hot sauce. Sauté for 4 minutes.
* Add parmesan cheese and fold in to incorporate, allowing to slightly melt.
* Remove from heat, add bread crumbs and parsley. Stir to incorporate and season with salt and pepper to taste.
* Stuff pocket of steaks with warm oyster stuffing.
* In heavy skillet over medium high heat, melt 1 tablespoon unsalted butter. Sear each side of steaks 2 minutes for 5 oz. or 3 minutes for 8 to 10 oz. steaks.
* Remove and cover with foil.
* In same pan add 1 tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon lemon juice and 1 tablespoon Cajun seasonings. Stir to incorporate.
* Quickly whisk in cream and bring to full heat.
* Serve steaks atop dirty rice and drizzle all with Cajun cream sauce.

 
http://wildideabuffalo.com/2011/carpetbag-steaks-2/

 

 

 

 

Wild Idea
http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/

Farmhouse Rules – Food Network

November 24, 2013 at 10:48 AM | Posted in cooking, Food | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A new show I caught last week was Farmhouse Rules. Looks like it’s going to be a good one. All about Country Cooking and Recipes. Here’s some more details about it.

 

farmhouse
Farmhouse Rules
A successful business owner and warm-hearted grandma, Nancy Fuller is bringing the farm to the table on her all-new series, Farmhouse Rules, airing Sundays at 11:30am/10:30c. She’ll gather local goods near her home in upstate New York, then nourish her family with feel-good comfort food.

 
About the Show

Farmhouse Rules is a lifestyle and cooking show centered on Nancy Fuller’s kitchen and the Hudson Valley farming community that supplies it. Nancy is a warm, loving, mother of six and grandmother to 13, and a no-nonsense owner of a multimillion-dollar business she runs with her husband. Follow the bold and lively Nancy as she gathers the best the land has to offer and feeds her family and friends classic, farm-fresh meals.

 
Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/farmhouse-rules/index.html?oc=linkback

One of America’s Favorites – the Buffet

November 4, 2013 at 9:30 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A buffet (IPA: [ˈbʊfeɪ] in UK, IPA: [bʉˈfeɪ] in US, from French: sideboard) is a system of serving meals in which food is placed in a public area where the diners generally serve themselves. Buffets are offered at various places including hotels and many social events. Buffets usually have some hot dishes, so the term cold buffet (see Smörgåsbord) has been developed to describe formats lacking hot food. Hot or cold buffets usually involve dishware and utensils, but a finger buffet is an array of foods that are designed to be small and easily consumed by hand alone, such as cupcakes, slices of pizza, foods on cocktail sticks, etc.
The essential feature of the various buffet formats is that the diners can directly view the food and immediately select which dishes they wish to consume, and usually also can decide how much food they take. Buffets are effective for serving large numbers of people at once, and are often seen in institutional settings, such as business conventions or large parties.

 

 

A Chinese American buffet restaurant in the US

A Chinese American buffet restaurant in the US

Since a buffet involves diners serving themselves, it has in the past been considered an informal form of dining, less formal than table service. In recent years, however, buffet meals are increasingly popular among hosts of home dinner parties, especially in homes where limited space complicates the serving of individual table places.

 

 
The buffet table originates from the Brännvinsbord—Swedish schnapps (shot of alcoholic beverage) table from the middle of 16th century. This custom had its prime during the early 18th century, and was developed into the more modern buffet around the beginning of 19th century. The smörgåsbord buffet did not increase in popularity until the expansion of the railroads throughout Europe.
The smörgåsbord table originally was a meal where guests gathered before dinner for a pre-dinner drink, and was not part of the formal dinner to be followed. The smörgåsbord buffet was often held in separate rooms for men and women before the dinner was served.
Smörgåsbord became internationally known as “smorgasbord” at the 1939 New York World’s Fair exhibition, as the Swedes had to invent a new way of showcasing the best of Swedish food to large numbers of visitors.
The term buffet originally referred to the French sideboard furniture where the food was served, but eventually became applied to the serving format. The word buffet became popular in the English-speaking world in the second half of the 20th century after the Swedes had popularized the smorgasbord in New York. The word is now fully accepted into the English language.

 

 
When the possession of gold and silver has been a measure of solvency of a regime, the display of it, in the form of plates and vessels, is more a political act and a gesture of conspicuous consumption. The 16th-century French term buffet applied both to the display itself and to the furniture on which it was mounted, often draped with rich textiles, but more often as the century advanced the word described an elaborately carved cupboard surmounted by tiers of shelves. In England such a buffet was called a court cupboard. Prodigal displays of plate were probably first revived at the fashionable court of Burgundy and adopted in France. The Baroque displays of silver and gold that were affected by Louis XIV of France were immortalized in paintings by Alexandre-François Desportes and others, before Louis’ plate and his silver furniture had to be sent to the mint to pay for the wars at the end of his reign.
During the 18th century more subtle demonstrations of wealth were preferred. The buffet was revived in England and France at the end of the century, when new ideals of privacy made a modicum of self-service at breakfast-time appealing, even among those who could have had a footman servant behind each chair. In The Cabinet Dictionary of 1803, Thomas Sheraton presented a neoclassical design and observed that “a buffet may, with some propriety, be restored to modern use, and prove ornamental to a modern breakfast-room, answering as the china cabinet/repository of a tea equipage”.

 

 
There are many different ways of offering diners a selection of foods which are called “buffet” style meals. Some buffets are “single pass only”, but most buffets allow a diner to first take small samples of unfamiliar foods, and then to return for more servings. To avoid misunderstandings, the rules and charges are often posted on signs near the buffet serving tables in commercial eating establishments.
* One form of buffet is to have a table filled with plates containing fixed portions of food; customers select plates containing whichever dishes they want as they walk along. This form is most commonly seen in cafeterias. Another derivative of this type of buffet occurs where patrons choose food from a buffet style layout and then pay based on what was chosen (sometimes based on the weight of the food, or color-coded plates).
* A variation occurs in a Dim sum house, where seated patrons make their selections from wheeled carts containing different plates of food which the staff circulate through the restaurant. Another variation is a conveyor belt sushi restaurant, where seated patrons select dishes from a continuously-moving conveyor belt carrying a variety of foods. In another variation, Brazilian-style rodizio buffets feature roving waiters serving churrascaria barbecued meats from large skewers to the seated diners’ plates.
* The “all-you-can-eat” (AYCE) buffet is more free-form; customers pay a fixed fee and then can help themselves to as much food as they wish to eat in a single meal. This form is found often in restaurants, especially in hotels. In some countries, this format is popular for “Sunday brunch” buffets.
* A so-called Mongolian barbecue buffet format allows diners to collect various thinly-sliced raw foods and add flavorings, which are then stir-fried on a large griddle by a restaurant cook.
* A salad bar is commonly offered in delicatessens and supermarkets, in which customers help themselves to lettuce and other salad ingredients, then pay by weight. Sometimes only cold foods are offered, but often warmed or hot foods are available at a “hot foods bar”, possibly at a different price by weight.
* Open buffets are often associated with a celebration of some sort, and there may be no explicit charge or the cost may be included in an admission fee to the entire event.
As a compromise between self-service and full table service, a staffed buffet may be offered: diners carry their own plate along the buffet line and are given a portion by a server at each station, which may be selected or skipped by the diner. This method is prevalent at catered meetings where diners are not paying specifically for their meal.
Alternatively, diners may serve themselves for most prepared selections, but a carvery station for roasted meats is staffed. Some buffet formats also feature staffed stations where crepes, omelettes, noodle soups, barbecued meats, or sushi are custom prepared at the request of individual diners.

 

 
The “all-you-can-eat” buffet has been ascribed to Herb Macdonald, a Las Vegas publicity and entertainment manager who introduced the idea in 1956.
Many boarding schools, colleges, and universities offer optional or mandatory “meal plans”, especially in connection with dormitories for students. These are often in an “all-you-can-eat” buffet format, sometimes called “all-you-care-to-eat” to encourage dietary moderation. The format may also be used in other institutional settings, such as military bases, large factories, cruise ships, or medium-security prisons.

 

 
In Australia, buffet chains such as Sizzler serve a large number of patrons with carvery meats, seafood, salads and desserts. Buffets are also common in Returned and Services League of Australia (RSL) clubs and some motel restaurants.
In Brazil, comida a quilo or comida por quilo — literally, “food by [the] kilo” — restaurants are common. This is a cafeteria style buffet in which diners are billed by the weight of the food selected, excluding the weight of the plate. Brazilian cuisine’s rodízio style is all-you-can-eat, having both non-self-service and self-service variations.
In Japan, a buffet or smorgasbord is known as a viking. It is said that this originated from the restaurant “Imperial Viking” in the Imperial Hotel, Tokyo, which was the first restaurant in Japan to serve buffet-style meals. Dessert Vikings are very popular in Japan, where one can eat from a buffet full of desserts.
In Russia, the chain MooMoo (or МуМу in Russian) serves all its food buffet-style.
In Sweden, a traditional form of buffet is the smörgåsbord, which literally means table of sandwiches.

 

 
In the US, there are numerous Chinese-American cuisine inspired buffet restaurants, and well as those serving primarily traditional American fare. Also, South Asian cuisine is increasingly available in the buffet format, and sushi has become more popular at buffets. In some regions, Brazilian-style rodizio churrascaria barbecue buffets are available.
Las Vegas is famous for its all-you-can-eat buffets (which are common in casinos) as depicted in the 2007 documentary film BUFFET: All You Can Eat Las Vegas.
Buffets, Inc. is a large buffet chain corporation which owns Old Country Buffet, Country Buffet, Fire Mountain, Ryan’s Steakhouse, and HomeTown Buffet. HomeTown Buffet popularized the “scatter buffet”, which refers to the layout of separate food pavilions. Other American restaurant chains well known for their buffets include America’s Incredible Pizza Company, Chuck-A-Rama, Cici’s Pizza, Fresh Choice (a West Coast competitor of Sweet Tomatoes), Western Sizzlin’, Furr’s Family Dining, Gatti’s Pizza, Golden Corral (which features food products presented in pans), Pancho’s Mexican Buffet, Ponderosa Steakhouse, Shakey’s Pizza, Sizzler, and Sweet Tomatoes (known in particular for its soups and salads).

 

 

2013 U.S. apple crop is up 13 percent

September 22, 2013 at 8:29 AM | Posted in fruits | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

The estimate was given during the association’s annual Apple Crop Outlook and Marketing Conference, held Aug. 22-23 in Chicago.

The 2013 estimate represents a 13 percent increase over 2012’s final crop of 215 million bushels, and a 9 percent increase over the five-year average (224 million bushels). It’s the largest crop since 2004, according to USDA statistics.

This was the first year the association prepared its estimate without the benefit of a parallel USDA survey, which was suspended due to budget constraints.

“This was a challenging task in light of the USDA not conducting its work this year,” said Mark Seetin, USApple’s director of regulatory and industry affairs.

“The national crop is up from last year, on the whole and countrywide, but I don’t think it’s a burdensome crop at all,” said Phil Glaize owner of Glaize Orchards in Winchester, Va. “It’s only the 13th largest crop this country has ever produced.”

East

In the Eastern states, the 2013 estimate is 58 million bushels, 39 percent greater than the 2012 crop and 6 percent greater than the five-year average.

“The big news is New York and North Carolina have come back with their production this year,” Glaize said.

New York is expected to be up 87 percent, with a total crop of 32,000 bushels. North Carolina should increase 339 percent, to 3,500 bushels.

“The production from North Carolina to New England is skewed a little bit more toward fresh this year,” Glaize said. “Any holes in the crops are basically in the processing plants.

“This year, there are no major quality issues do to weather,” Glaize said. “Sizing is good throughout the region. With an abnormal amount of rain, you might have thought apples are extra large, but I don’t really think we have that. There is a spread of sizes, not too many small ones, with mostly medium-size to medium-large apples.”

Midwest

The Midwest estimate is 35 million bushels, 472 percent greater than 2012 and 61 percent above the five-year average.

“My favorite number is the 996 percent increase in Michigan over last year,” said Mike Rothwell, president of BelleHarvest Sales in Belding, Mich.

“Michigan’s 16 million bushels for a five-year average has been influenced by crop failures in 2008, 2010 and 2012,” Rothwell said. “With the crop fluctuations we’ve had, we no longer have normals, just averages.”

Rothwell said marketers began pushing the 2013 crop earlier this year, looking for new markets with deeper penetration and increased exports.

Production and infrastructure improvements, combined with more cooperative weather, are leading to the crop’s recovery.

“The new state bird for the state of Michigan is going to be the frost fan,” he said. “Hopefully, these fluctuations from size will begin to level off. It almost has to.”

West

In the Western states, the 2013 estimate is 149 million bushels, down 11 percent from 2012 but 1 percent greater than the five-year average.

Washington state will be down 10 percent, to 140 million bushels. This follows a record crop of 154 million bushels in 2012.

“Washington has had some heat with some sunburn,” said Dan Kelly, assistant manager of Washington Growers Clearinghouse. “We’ve also had some hail. After a lengthy discussion about fresh and processing, we’ve come up with 140 million. That will be the second-largest apple crop on record.”

Kelly said Idaho has had issues with tight labor, early frost and a lot of heat. That state’s production was adjusted down to 1 million bushels, a 44 percent decrease from last year and 35 percent below the five-year average.

California’s 2013 estimate of 4.8 million bushels is 33 percent less than 2012’s crop, and 32 percent below the 5-year average.

“They are heavily into their harvest, having gone through a lot of Galas already,” Kelly said. “They’ve had 14 days of 100 degrees or higher heat, and they’re also 14 days early.”

– Gary Pullano

 

 

http://fruitgrowersnews.com/index.php/magazine/article/united-fresh-a-fresh-cut-for-the-future

Gotham Greens -Greens On The Roof Of A Brooklyn Warehouse!

September 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM | Posted in vegetables | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

I was watching the Cooking Channel yesterday, Bobby Deen‘s “Not My Mama’s Meals”. On the show he visited a place, in Brooklyn, New York, called Gotham Green. What an amazing story and company! Gardens grown year round on the rooftops in NYC. Below is part of their story and a web link to their site. If you get a chance check them out, some great and interesting reading.

 

 

Gotham Greens was founded in 2008Gotham Greens

by Viraj Puri and Eric Haley who had a vision for a local farm that would offer New York chefs and retailers the freshest and highest quality culinary ingredients, year-round, at competitive prices. Jenn Nelkin, a nationally renowned greenhouse expert, joined Gotham Greens as a partner in 2009 to head all greenhouse operations.
Gotham Greens’ first greenhouse facility, in Greenpoint, Brookyn, will begin harvesting in June 2011. The greenhouse will annually produce over 80 tons of premium quality produce, year-round, that will be available at select retailers, markets and restaurants across the city. In 2012, Gotham Greens plans to expand operations to grow an even more diverse range of premium quality leaf and vine crops.

Gotham Greens is committed to the highest quality standards.

Our growers are passionate about producing the finest quality, freshest, best tasting, and most nutritious culinary ingredients available in New York City. They care about our customers just as much as they care about the every need of our plants, from seed to harvest.
Our products are harvested before breakfast so they can be on your plate by lunch. We don’t just blindly talk about being “local” “sustainable” and “natural”. While our business is about those things, we care about what those things stand for: flavor and nutrition, preserving water and soil resources, biodiversity, reducing harmful chemical use in food production, fair treatment of workers, and spending our dollars closer to home.
Our farm is unconventional. But so is our commitment to quality, taste and sustainability.

Gotham Greens2Gotham Greens’ first greenhouse facility, located on a rooftop in Greenpoint, Brookyn, will begin harvesting in June 2011. Our state of the art rooftop greenhouses combine advanced horticultural and engineering techniques to optimize crop production, crop quality, and production efficiency. The climate controlled facility will grow premium quality produce, year-round.

Greenhouse
Our greenhouse has been designed to give our expert growers complete control of the growing environment — light, temperature, humidity, CO2, nutrition, which ensures unmatched product quality. Our fully enclosed, sterile greenhouses minimize pest and disease risk. Our crops are protected against inclement weather and extreme weather events ensuring reliable and consistent yields. Sophisticated computer control systems manage heating, cooling, irrigation and plant nutrition.

Hydroponics
Hydroponics is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions. Nutrients are delivered to the plant in irrigation water eliminating soil. Water is re-circulated and none is wasted. The sterile, soil-free growing environment eliminates the risk of pathogens that is particularly important in light of the increase in food borne illnesses, such as E coli and salmonella, from fresh vegetables. Hydroponics does not result in any soil erosion nor the loss of precious soil nutrients. Hydroponics allows control over plant nutrition, for optimal flavor and quality. Our specially designed re-circulating hydroponic methods save land, save water, eliminate agricultural runoff and chemical pesticides, and offer the benefits of efficient, high-yield, local, year-round food production.

Year Round Production
By operating year round, Gotham Greens can provide locally grown vegetables and herbs, even in the winter months, when local supply is typically low.

 

http://gothamgreens.com/

Boar’s Head Provision Company

September 1, 2013 at 9:24 AM | Posted in Boar's Head | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

When I purchase Cold Cut Meats from the deli or packaged Cold Cuts I try to go with Boar’s Head Meats. Besides being the best tasting Cold Cuts, for the most part their healthier being lower in sodium, fat, and carbs. Anyway here’s a little background on Boar’s Head and a link to their web site. While there check out their recipe page, it’s loaded!

 

Boarsheadmeatslogo

 

Boar’s Head Provision Company
Boar’s Head Provision Company is a supplier of delicatessen meats and cheeses. The company was founded in 1905 in the New York City area and now distributes its products throughout the United States.

 

 

Boar’s Head Brand® began in the New York City area in 1905. Products were delivered by horse-drawn wagon to small delicatessens and Boars Head Meats“Mom and Pop” stores.

By 1933, distribution of Boar’s Head Brand products had grown. It was at that time that the founder, Frank Brunckhorst, dissatisfied with the quality of cooked hams which were available to him, decided that he would open a manufacturing plant of his own. The first plant was started in a small building in Brooklyn with only three employees.

Even back then there were thousands of delicatessens in New York City, and there were a great number of small manufacturers of delicatessen specialties. The competition among these manufacturers was keen; and as a result, very high standards were set for the quality of delicatessen products. Frank Brunckhorst set his own high standards, and he would not vary from them. Before long, Boar’s Head Brand products could be found in all of the best delicatessens, gourmet stores and fine food establishments in the New York area.

 
Our Mission
Our mission is to continue to be recognized as the leading provider of exceptional customer service and superior quality delicatessen products.
Commitment
We will continuously improve our time-honored traditional processes through the involvement of our dedicated employees.

 

 

http://boarshead.com/

August 17-18, 2013 National Hamburger Festival – Akron, Ohio

August 15, 2013 at 11:17 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

August 17-18, 2013 National Hamburger Festival – Akron, Ohio

Hamburger Cook-Off, Ohio Hamburger Eating Championships, Bobbing For Burgers, Miss Hamburger Festival, Live Music, Family & National Hamburger FestivalChildren’s Activities.
Attendance: 30,000+.
About Us

The National Hamburger Festival is the brainchild of Drew Cerza President/CEO of the Just Wing It Productions located in New York. As founder of the National Chicken Wing Festival, and the Road to Buffalo Tour, Cerza has a history of successful event management across the country.

This year marks the 7th anniversary of the National Hamburger Festival. Over 120,000 hamburger fans have enjoyed family fun, great entertainment and one of the largest assortments of hamburgers ever assembled in one place. The Food Network filmed the festival for a segment on their hit show “Unwrapped”. Local media, including television, radio and print are always on-site for the annual event. The citizens of Ohio and Akron Mayor Plusquellic embraced the festival with open arms making the event a great success. The festival is held at historic Lock 3 Park in beautiful downtown Akron. The festival raises money each year for one of Akron’s favorite charities, the Akron Children’s Hospital.
http://www.hamburgerfestival.com/

One of America’s Favorites – Bagels

July 22, 2013 at 7:39 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A bagel (also spelled beigel) is a bread product, traditionally shaped by hand into the form of a ring from yeasted wheat dough,

A plain commercially produced bagel

A plain commercially produced bagel

roughly hand-sized, which is first boiled for a short time in water and then baked. The result is a dense, chewy, doughy interior with a browned and sometimes crisp exterior. Bagels are often topped with seeds baked on the outer crust, with the traditional ones being poppy or sesame seeds. Some also may have salt sprinkled on their surface, and there are also a number of different dough types such as whole-grain or rye.
Bagels have become a popular bread product in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, especially in cities with large Jewish populations, many with different ways of making bagels. Like other bakery products, bagels are available (either fresh or frozen, and often in many flavor varieties) in many major supermarkets in those countries.
The basic roll-with-a-hole design is hundreds of years old and has other practical advantages besides providing for a more even cooking and baking of the dough: the hole could be used to thread string or dowels through groups of bagels, allowing for easier handling and transportation and more appealing seller displays.

 

 

Contrary to some beliefs, the bagel was not created in the shape of a stirrup to commemorate the victory of Poland’s King Jan III Sobieski over the Ottoman Turks in the Battle of Vienna in 1683. It was actually invented much earlier in Kraków, Poland, as a competitor to the obwarzanek, a lean bread of wheat flour designed for Lent. Leo Rosten wrote in “The Joys of Yiddish” about the first known mention of the word bajgiel in the “Community Regulations” of the city of Kraków in 1610, which stated that the item was given as a gift to women in childbirth.
In the 16th and first half of the 17th centuries, the bajgiel became a staple of the Polish national diet, and a staple of the Slavic diet generally. That the name originated from beugal (old spelling of Bügel, meaning bail/bow or bale) is considered plausible by many[who?], both from the similarities of the word and because traditional handmade bagels are not perfectly circular but rather slightly stirrup-shaped. (This, however, may be due to the way the boiled bagels are pressed together on the baking sheet before baking.)
Additionally, variants of the word beugal are used in Yiddish and Austrian German to refer to a somewhat similar form of sweet filled pastry (Mohnbeugel (with poppy seeds) and Nussbeugel (with ground nuts)), or in southern German dialects (where beuge refers to a pile, e.g., holzbeuge, or woodpile). According to the Merriam-Webster’s dictionary, ‘bagel’ derives from the transliteration of the Yiddish ‘beygl’, which came from the Middle High German ‘böugel’ or ring, which itself came from ‘bouc’ (ring) in Old High German, similar to the Old English ‘bēag’ ‘(ring), and ‘būgan’ (to bend or bow). Similarly another etymology in the Webster’s New World College Dictionary says that the Middle High German form was derived from the Austrian German ‘beugel’, a kind of croissant, and was similar to the German ‘bügel’, a stirrup or ring.
In the Brick Lane district and surrounding area of London, England, bagels, or as locally spelled “beigels” have been sold since the middle of the 19th century. They were often displayed in the windows of bakeries on vertical wooden dowels, up to a metre in length, on racks.
Bagels were brought to the United States by immigrant Polish-Jews, with a thriving business developing in New York City that was controlled for decades by Bagel Bakers Local 338, which had contracts with nearly all bagel bakeries in and around the city for its workers, who prepared all their bagels by hand. The bagel came into more general use throughout North America in the last quarter of the 20th century, which was due at least partly to the efforts of bagel baker Harry Lender, his son, Murray Lender, and Florence Sender, who pioneered automated production and distribution of frozen bagels in the 1960s. Murray also invented pre-slicing the bagel.
In modern times, Canadian-born astronaut Gregory Chamitoff is the first person known to have taken a batch of bagels into space on his 2008 Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station. His shipment consisted of 18 sesame seed bagels.

 

 

At its most basic, traditional bagel dough contains wheat flour (without germ or bran), salt, water, and yeast leavening. Bread flour or

Bagels with cream cheese and lox

Bagels with cream cheese and lox

other high gluten flours are preferred to create the firm and dense but spongy bagel shape and chewy texture. Most bagel recipes call for the addition of a sweetener to the dough, often barley malt (syrup or crystals), honey, sugar, with or without eggs, milk or butter. Leavening can be accomplished using either a sourdough technique or using commercially produced yeast.
Bagels are traditionally made by:

 

* mixing and kneading the ingredients to form the dough
* shaping the dough into the traditional bagel shape, round with a hole in the middle, from a long thin piece of dough
* proofing the bagels for at least 12 hours at low temperature (40–50 °F = 4.5–10 °C)
* boiling each bagel in water that may or may not contain additives such as lye, baking soda, barley malt syrup, or honey
* baking at between 175 °C and 315 °C (about 350–600 °F)
It is this unusual production method which is said to give bagels their distinctive taste, chewy texture, and shiny appearance. In recent years, a variant of this process has emerged, producing what is sometimes called the steam bagel. To make a steam bagel, the process of boiling is skipped, and the bagels are instead baked in an oven equipped with a steam injection system. In commercial bagel production, the steam bagel process requires less labor, since bagels need only be directly handled once, at the shaping stage. Thereafter, the bagels need never be removed from their pans as they are refrigerated and then steam-baked. The steam-bagel is not considered to be a genuine bagel by purists, as it results in a fluffier, softer, less chewy product more akin to a finger roll that happens to be shaped like a bagel. Steam bagels are also considered lower quality by purists as the dough used is intentionally more basic. The increase in pH is to aid browning since the steam injection process uses neutral water steam instead of a basic solution bath.
If not consumed immediately, there are certain storing techniques that can help to keep the bagel moist and fresh. First, cool bagels in a paper bag, then wrap the paper bag in a plastic bag (attempting to rid the bags of as much air as possible without squishing the bagels), then freeze for up to six months.

 

 

The two most prominent styles of traditional bagel in North America are the Montreal-style bagel and the New York-style bagel. The Montreal bagel contains malt and sugar with no salt; it is boiled in honey-sweetened water before baking in a wood-fired oven; and it is predominantly either of the poppy “black” or sesame “white” seeds variety. The New York bagel contains salt and malt and is boiled in water prior to baking in a standard oven. The resulting New York bagel is puffy with a moist crust, while the Montreal bagel is smaller (though with a larger hole), crunchier, and sweeter.
Chicago-style bagels are baked or baked with steam.
Poppy seeds are sometimes called by their Yiddish name, spelled either mun or mon (written מאָן) which is very similar to the German word for poppy, Mohn, as used in Mohnbrötchen. The traditional London bagel (or beigel as it is spelled) is harder and has a coarser texture with air bubbles.
American chef John Mitzewich suggests a recipe for what he calls “San Francisco-Style Bagels”. His recipe yields bagels flatter than New York-style bagels and characterized by a rough-textured crust.

 

 

While normally and traditionally made of yeasted wheat, in the late 20th century many variations on the bagel flourished.

Three Montreal-style bagels: one poppy and two sesame bagels

Three Montreal-style bagels: one poppy and two sesame bagels

Nontraditional versions which change the dough recipe include pumpernickel, rye, sourdough, bran, whole wheat, and multigrain. Other variations change the flavor of the dough, often using blueberry, salt, onion, garlic, egg, cinnamon, raisin, chocolate chip, cheese, or some combination of the above. Green bagels are sometimes created for St. Patrick’s Day.
Many corporate chains now offer bagels in such flavors as chocolate chip and French toast. Sandwich bagels have been popularized since the late 1990s by bagel specialty shops such as Bruegger’s and Einstein Brothers, and fast food restaurants such as McDonald’s. Breakfast bagels, a softer, sweeter variety usually sold in fruity or sweet flavors (e.g., cherry, strawberry, cheese, blueberry, cinnamon-raisin, chocolate chip, maple syrup, banana and nuts) are commonly sold by large supermarket chains. These are usually sold sliced and are intended to be prepared in a toaster.
A flat bagel, known as a ‘Flagel’, can be found in a few locations in and around New York City and Toronto. According to a review attributed to New York’s Village Voice food critic Robert Seitsema, the Flagel was first created by Brooklyn’s Tasty Bagels deli in the early 1990s.
Though the original bagel has a fairly well defined recipe and method of production, there is no legal standard of identity for bagels in the United States. Bakers are thus free to call any bread torus a bagel, even those that deviate wildly from the original formulation.

 

 

According to the American Institute of Baking (AIB), year 2008 supermarket sales (52 week period ending January 27, 2009) of the top eight leading commercial fresh (not frozen) bagel brands in the United States:
* totalled to US$430,185,378 based on 142,669,901 package unit sales.
* the top eight leading brand names for the above were (by order of sales): Thomas’, Sara Lee, (private label brands) Pepperidge Farm, Thomas Mini Squares, Lender’s Bagels (Pinnacle Foods), Weight Watchers and The Alternative Bagel (Western Bagel).
Further, AIB-provided statistics for the 52 week period ending May 18, 2008, for refrigerated/frozen supermarket bagel sales for the top 10 brand names totalled US$50,737,860, based on 36,719,977 unit package sales.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Pickled Cucumber

May 20, 2013 at 11:49 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 4 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A pickled cucumber (commonly known as a pickle in Canada, and the United States or generically as gherkins in the UK) is a cucumber

A deli pickle

A deli pickle

that has been pickled in a brine, vinegar, or other solution and left to ferment for a period of time, by either immersing the cucumbers in an acidic solution or through souring by lacto-fermentation.

 
A gherkin is not only a pickle of a certain size but also a particular species of cucumber: the West Indian or Burr Gherkin (Cucumis anguria), which produces a somewhat smaller fruit than the garden cucumber (Cucumis sativus). Standard pickles are made from the Burr Gherkin, but the term gherkin has become loosely used as any small cucumber pickled in a vinegar brine, regardless of the variety of cucumber used.

 
Cornichons are tart French pickles made from small gherkins pickled in vinegar and tarragon. They traditionally accompany pâtés.

 
Brined pickles are prepared using the traditional process of natural fermentation in a brine which makes them grow sour. The brine concentration can vary between 20 g/litre to more than 40 g/litre of salt. There is no vinegar used in the brine of naturally fermented pickled cucumbers.
The fermentation process is entirely dependent on the naturally occurring Lactobacillus bacteria that normally cover the skin of a growing cucumber. Since these are routinely removed during commercial harvesting/packing processes, traditionally prepared pickles can only be made from freshly harvested cucumbers, unless the bacteria are artificially replaced.
Typically, small cucumbers are placed in a glass or ceramic vessel or a wooden barrel, together with a variety of spices. Among those traditionally used in many recipes are garlic, horseradish, whole dill stems with umbels and green seeds, white mustard seeds, grape, oak, cherry, blackcurrant and bay laurel leaves, dried allspice fruits, and—most importantly—salt. The container is then filled with cooled, boiled water and kept under a non-airtight cover (often cloth tied on with string or a rubber band) for several weeks, depending on taste and external temperature. Traditionally stones, also sterilized by boiling, are placed on top of the cucumbers to keep them under the water. The more salt is added the more sour the cucumbers become.
Since they are produced without vinegar, a film of bacteria forms on the top, but this does not indicate they have spoiled, and the film is simply removed. They do not, however, keep as long as cucumbers pickled with vinegar, and usually must be refrigerated. Some commercial manufacturers add vinegar as a preservative.

 
A “kosher” dill pickle is not necessarily kosher in the sense that it has been prepared in accordance with Jewish dietary law. Rather, it is a pickle made in the traditional manner of Jewish New York City pickle makers, with generous addition of garlic and dill to a natural salt brine.

In New York terminology, a “full-sour” kosher dill is one that has fully fermented, while a “half-sour,” given a shorter stay in the brine, is still crisp and bright green. Elsewhere, these pickles may sometimes be termed “old” and “new” dills.
Dill pickles (not necessarily described as “kosher”) have been served in New York City since at least 1899. They are not, however, native to New York; they have been prepared in Russia, Ukraine, Germany and Poland for hundreds of years.

 
The Polish-style pickled cucumber (Polish: ogórek kiszony/kwaszony) is a variety developed in the northern parts of Europe. It has been exported worldwide and is found in the cuisines of many countries. It is sour, similar to kosher dills, but tends to be seasoned differently[citation needed]. It is usually preserved in wooden barrels. A cucumber only pickled for a few days is different in taste (less sour) than one pickled for a longer time and is called ogórek małosolny, which literally means ‘little salt cucumber’. This distinction is similar to the one between half- and full-sour types of kosher dills.
Another kind of pickled cucumber, popular in Poland, is ogórek konserwowy (‘preserved cucumber’) which is rather sweet and vinegary in taste, due to different composition of the preserving solution. It is kept in jars instead of barrels or cans.

 
In Hungary, while regular vinegar-pickled cucumbers (Hungarian: savanyú uborka) are made during most of the year, during the summer kovászos uborka (“leavened pickles”) are made without the use of vinegar. Cucumbers are placed in a glass vessel along with spices (usually dill and garlic), water and salt. Additionally, a slice or two of bread are placed at the top and bottom of the solution, and the container is left to sit in the sun for a few days so the yeast in the bread can help cause a fermentation process.

 
Lime pickles are soaked in lime rather than in a salt brine. This is done more to enhance texture (by making them crisper) rather than as a preservative. The lime is then rinsed off the pickles. Vinegar and sugar are often added after the 24-hour soak in lime, along with pickling spices.

A jar of bread-and-butter pickles

A jar of bread-and-butter pickles

 
Bread-and-butter pickles are sweeter in flavor than dill pickles, having a high concentration of sugar or other sweetener added to the brine. Cucumbers to be made into bread and butters are often sliced before pickling.

 
Swedish pickled cucumbers (pressgurka) are thinly sliced, mixed with salt and pressed to drain some water from the cucumber slices. Afterwards placed in a jar with a sour-sweet brine of vinegar, sugar, dill and mustard seeds.
Danish cucumber salad (agurkesalat) is similar, but the cucumbers are not pressed and the brine doesn’t have parsley. The cucumber salad accompanies meat dishes, especially a roasted chicken dish (gammeldags kylling med agurkesalat), and is used on Danish hot dogs.

 
Kool-Aid pickles or “koolickles”, enjoyed by children in parts of the Southern United States are created by soaking dill pickles in a mixture of Kool-Aid and pickle brine.

 
Like pickled vegetables such as sauerkraut, sour pickled cucumbers (technically a fruit) are low in calories. They also contain a moderate amount of vitamin K, specifically in the form of K1. One sour pickled cucumber “spear” offers 12–16 µg, or approximately 15–20%, of the Recommended Daily Allowance of vitamin K. It also offers three kilocalories, most of which come from carbohydrate. However, most sour pickled cucumbers are also high in sodium; one spear can contain 350–500 mg, or 15–20% of the American recommended daily limit of 2400 mg.
Sweet pickled cucumbers, including bread-and-butter pickles, are higher in calories due to their sugar content; one large gherkin may contain 20-30 calories. However, sweet pickled cucumbers also tend to contain significantly less sodium than sour pickles.

 
In the United States, pickles are often served as a side dish accompanying meals. This often takes the form of a “pickle spear”, which is a

Fried pickles

Fried pickles

pickled cucumber cut length-wise into quarters or sixths. Pickles may be used as a condiment on a hamburger or other sandwich (usually in slice form), or on a sausage or hot dog in chopped form as pickle relish.
Soured cucumbers are commonly used in a variety of dishes—for example, pickle-stuffed meatloaf, potato salad or chicken salad—or consumed alone as an appetizer.
Pickles are sometimes served alone as festival foods, often on a stick. This is also done in Japan, where it is referred to as “stick pickle”. Dill pickles can be fried, typically deep-fried with a breading or batter surrounding the spear or slice. This is a popular dish in the Southern U.S., and a rising trend elsewhere in the US.
In Russia and Ukraine, pickles are used in rassolnik: a traditional soup made from pickled cucumbers, pearl barley, pork or beef kidneys, and various herbs. The dish is known to have existed as far back as the 15th century, when it was called kalya.

 
The term pickle is derived from the Dutch word pekel, meaning brine. In the U.S. and Canada, the word pickle alone almost always refers to a pickled cucumber (other types of pickles will be described as “pickled onion,” “pickled beets,” etc.). In the UK pickle generally refers to ploughman’s pickle, such as Branston pickle, traditionally served with a ploughman’s lunch.

The Holey Donuts!® Story

January 2, 2013 at 12:46 PM | Posted in diabetes, Food | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,

I haven’t ordered any Donuts yet. But as soon as I do I’ll give you a review of them. Anyway here’s the story and web site link to The Holy Donuts!

Back in 1958, my father was literally one of the first franchisees with what is today the world’s most successful donut chain. Spending holy dmy childhood in the back of a donut shop eventually led to me running and owning my own donut shops. Always having a love for donuts, I set out to create a donut like no other; something that would elevate donuts to a new level; something more high-end, more gourmet, and really just the best donut you could make. Then one day, I walked away from the deep fat fryer and began to actually cook my donuts in a different way. Then at first bite, I said “HOLY $#!%, these are really good!” Thus, the name Holey Donuts!

Having a feeling that these donuts had to be very low in fat, we sent samples off to an FDA approved lab for testing… low and behold, they had less than 3 grams of fat. Wow, we were just amazed at the light, fluffy taste, texture and light color (which is the way donuts actually look before they are fried in that same dirty oil over and over again). From there, it was a story of dedication and perseverance to do whatever it took to succeed and bring these great tasting, guilt free treats to the world. After all, the Wall Street Journal put it best when they said “Food companies have been able to take most of the fat out of everything from cheese to Twinkies. But no one has succeeded in designing a marketable low-fat doughnut.”

We knew we had something very special, but we also knew that the donuts would be very difficult to produce, having to be made individually by hand, requiring skills that have mostly been taken over by machines today. These premium, low fat gourmet donuts would require 22 steps from the mixing, hand rolling, cutting, special patented cooking process; and that’s all before we hand fill and decorate each donut with the finest homemade care. One by one, we then gently hand package and freeze the donuts before shipping them to you with our carefully designed frozen FedEx delivery system. Once the donuts arrive at your home, we encourage you to store your treats in the freezer, and then follow the instructions on the box to have the ultimate, guilt free treat. It’s like having your own donut shop in your freezer… ever had a warm donut? If you haven’t you need to try this. Through our little shop in New York (yes, we are only mail order, sorry no store to visit yet) we have become the media darling. First it was word of mouth, then the celebrities, then the media from New York to Tokyo.

I’ve always talked about Holey Donuts as being the entrepreneurial equivalent to walking on the moon… it’s hard enough to launch a new product, but a low fat donut? A donut so fresh and delicate it had to be sold frozen? You can imagine the challenges and struggles from the early days when I had to raise money from private investors and do whatever it took to get the product out there. Heck, I even delivered donuts from the back of my car around New York City. We never set out to make diet donuts… it just happened because we were not deep frying them. Because we were not looking to make diet donuts, we avoided artificial sweeteners resulting in the fact that nothing about our donuts tasted low fat. Just real donuts with real donut ingredients cooked in a revolutionary way, what we refer to as our “patented process.”Loved at first bite by people from around the world, from our delicious and amazing low fat donuts to our custom made crumb donut toppings (yes, we actually bake low fat apple cinnamon muffins and then crumble them up by hand to make that yummy stuff).

We have resisted the temptations that face many successful small companies… yep a few wall street firms and even a national diet delivery company have looked at Holey Donuts!, but we refuse to sell out and become some mass marketed, supermarket product pumped up with all those things that make donuts last on a shelf for weeks. Holey Donuts! consists of a group of private investors who absolutely loved our donuts, concept and vision. These people have the foresight to grab hold of the American Dream and combine their talents to help Holey Donuts! bring better tasting, more wholesome baked goods to the world… from our kitchen to yours.

The future looks even brighter for Holey Donuts! as we put the finishing touches on the new Holey Donuts! retail store concept that will allow people to own and operate a Holey Donuts! retail store. With very low start-up costs, it will also be very simple and efficient for the owner to operate, while offering customers warm donuts that are actually frosted and filled to order right before their eyes (and yes, all while maintaining our unique low fat formula). Something to look forward to.

Thank you and all the best.

Frank Dilullo
Founder of Holey Donuts!

http://www.holeydonuts.net/

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Global Dine In

Global dishes in your home kitchen

The Heartie Kitchen

Heart Healthy, Plant Based Recipes

pico de priya

indulge yourself

This Geek Loves Food

Reviews of fiction-based & holiday cookbooks

The TV Mommy

The life of a television news reporter turned stay-at-home mom

Baking with Tori

for the love of food

MigaCandice And Her Notes

a juggler of sorts, i am. my mind could explode of thoughts, at times. i don't have much talent in writing them beautifully but i can still write, if not for artistic purposes, then just so that i won't forget.

melissa crismon

Oceans of Love

Taylor Tries...

I'm trying my best at adulting, complete with my pets and lots of vegan junk food

VEGAN OF FEW WORDS

Just the food, no chit-chat

Kitchen of Anna

Kitchen of Anna

Honey it's Plant Based

Just a big city girl trapped in quarantine, cooking her way through the long life aisle

The Fork and Table

Entertaining, Food and Always Fun!

Everyday Journeys

Everyday People

The Colour-Coordinated Vegan

Simple and Delicious Vegan Recipes with Colour-Coordinated Looks to Match

Flowers Faith Food

Celebrating Life

Allison Eat's

Lover of Food, Coffee, and Cats

RECIPES

Happiness: cooking, chatting and eating at home.

dirtandcactus.com

on becoming an expat in baja mexico