Boston-Style Baked Beans

October 4, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes | Leave a comment
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I have a 2nd Diabetic Friendly Recipe to pass along Boston-Style Baked Beans. This side dish is made using Navy Beans, Bacon, Onion, Yellow Mustard, Splenda, and Molasses. The Dish is 140 calories and 16 net carbs. Another winning recipe from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Boston-Style Baked Beans
A delicious formula for rich and flavorful, diabetic-friendly Boston baked beans.

Recipe Ingredients:
4 (15-ounce) cans navy beans, undrained1/2 pound bacon, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
1/4 cup yellow mustard
1/3 cup Splenda® No Calorie Sweetener, Granular
2 tablespoons robust molasses

Cooking Directions:
1 – Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).
2 – Drain navy beans and reserve 1 1/4 cups liquid.
3 – Fry bacon in a large skillet until browned. Remove bacon and reserve half of the bacon fat.
4 – Fry onion in reserved bacon fat and cook until translucent. Stir in beans and remaining ingredients.
5 – Pour beans into a 3-quart baking dish.
6 – Bake for 45 minutes.
Makes 18 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/18 of recipe): Calories: 140 Calories from Fat: 25 Total Fat: 3g Saturated Fat: 1g Cholesterol: 5mg Sodium: 520mg Total Carbs: 21g Dietary Fiber: 5g Sugars: 3g Protein: 9g.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/boston-style_baked_beans_recipe.html

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Bean and Spinach Dumplings on Wild Mushrooms

April 22, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is Bean and Spinach Dumplings on Wild Mushrooms. Where’s the Beef, who cares with this week’s recipe! Its Savory bean and spinach dumplings served atop sautéed wild mushrooms. The Dish is only 276 calories per serving. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website which has a huge selection of recipes for all cuisines so check it out today. So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Bean and Spinach Dumplings on Wild Mushrooms
Savory bean and spinach dumplings served atop sautéed wild mushrooms.

Recipe Ingredients:
1 1/2 cups cooked navy beans, drained and rinsed (or use canned, rinsed and drained)
1/2 cup onion, chopped
3 tablespoons olive oil – divided use
1 cup fresh spinach, chopped
1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped
1/2 cup cornmeal
1 cup freshly grated Romano cheese – divided use
3/4 teaspoon ground black pepper – divided use
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 large egg white
20 fresh (or dried and reconstituted) wild mushrooms, such as morels or porcini
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 teaspoon salt – divided use
2 cloves garlic, chopped

Cooking Directions:
1 – Purée beans in a food processor or blender. Set aside.
2 – Sauté onion in 2 tablespoons oil for 2 minutes. Add bean purée and cook 1 minute. Add spinach and cilantro and cook 2 minutes. Transfer mixture to a bowl. Add cornmeal and mix well. Then add half the cheese, 1/2 teaspoon pepper, nutmeg, and egg white. Combine thoroughly.
3 – Coat a large baking dish with 1 tablespoon oil. Set aside.
4 – Bring 3 quarts of water to a boil.
5 – Dip a teaspoon in cold water, then fill the wet spoon with batter and drop the dumpling into saucepan of boiling water. Repeat until all batter is used. Cover and simmer dumplings for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and place in baking dish. Sprinkle with remaining grated cheese and bake for 10 minutes at 350°F (175°C).
6 – If using fresh wild mushrooms, clean thoroughly. If mushrooms are dried, soak in tepid water for 20 to 60 minutes, until reconstituted. Drain thoroughly, squeezing out any excess liquid. Slice mushrooms into large pieces.
7 – Cook mushrooms in two batches. Sauté first batch in 2 tablespoons butter in a wide skillet over high heat for 2 minutes. When mushrooms begin to lose their juices, add 1/8 teaspoon each of salt and pepper, and half the garlic. Cook for another 3 minutes. Remove mushrooms from skillet and place on warm platter. Repeat for next batch.
8 – Place dumplings over mushrooms. Serve immediately.
Makes 4 servings

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/4 of recipe): Calories: 276g; Carbohydrates: 39g; Fat: 9g; Cholesterol: 8mg; Protein: 15g; Fiber: 9g; Sodium: 225mg (560mg using canned beans)
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/bean_and_spinach_dumplings_on_wild_mushrooms_recipe.html

It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Italian Skillet Roasted Vegetable Soup

April 20, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Diabetes Self Management, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | Leave a comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday is a recipe for Italian Skillet Roasted Vegetable Soup. This sounds like a hearty and filling recipe! Some of the ingredients you’ll need; Bell Peppers, Garlic, Diced Tomatoes, Zucchini, Navy Beans, and more! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website which has a fantastic selection of Diabetes Friendly Recipes along with Diabetes Management Tips, Diabetes News, and more so be sure to check it out. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Italian Skillet Roasted Vegetable Soup
Ingredients
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 medium red, yellow, or orange bell pepper, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
2 cups water
1 can (about 14 ounces) diced tomatoes
1 medium zucchini, thinly sliced lengthwise
1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 can (about 15 ounces) navy beans, rinsed and drained
3 to 4 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon liquid smoke (optional)

Directions
1 – Heat 1 tablespoon oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add bell pepper; cook and stir 4 minutes or until edges are browned. Add garlic; cook and stir 15 seconds. Add water, tomatoes, zucchini, and red pepper flakes; bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 20 minutes.

2 – Add beans, basil, remaining 1 tablespoon oil, vinegar, salt, and liquid smoke, if desired; simmer 5 minutes. Remove from heat; let stand, covered, 10 minutes before serving.

Tip. If your diet plan permits, top with croutons.

Yield: 5 servings.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 157 calories, Carbohydrates: 25 g, Protein: 8 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 670 mg, Fiber: 6 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/soups-stews/italian-skillet-roasted-vegetable-soup/

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Savory Navy Bean Casserole

April 9, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is – Savory Navy Bean Casserole. Navy Beans, Tomato Puree, Cheddar Cheese, ans Mozzarella Cheese make up this week’s recipe. It’s from the Cooks Recipes website which has a huge selection of recipes for all tastes and Cuisines. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Savory Navy Bean Casserole
A Mediterranean-style baked navy bean, tomato and cheese casserole.

Recipe Ingredients:
2 (15-ounce) cans navy beans, drained and rinsed.
1 (10-ounce) can tomato purée, no salt added
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
1 cup shredded mozzarella
2 tablespoons dried oregano

Cooking Directions:
1 – Lightly spray an 11×7 1/2-inch casserole dish with cooking spray.
2 – Mix cooked beans with tomato purée, and pour into dish.
3 – Combine cheeses and oregano, and spread on top of beans.
4 – Bake uncovered at 275°F (135°C) for 1 hour.
Makes 4 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/savory_navy_bean_casserole.html

Soup Special of the Day!………..Bean and Bacon Soup

June 11, 2017 at 4:52 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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This week’s Soup Special of the Day is Bean and Bacon Soup. Beans, Bacon, and spices makeup this week’s recipe. It’s from the CooksRecipes website (http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html) which has a huge selection of recipes of all cuisines and tastes, so check it out today. Enjoy and Eat Healthy!

 

Bean and Bacon Soup
Bacon adds a lovely smokiness to this hearty bean soup. Try it on a cold blustery day to rewarm your bones

Recipe Ingredients:

1 pound dry navy beans, sorted and rinsed
6 cups water
2 cloves garlic, crushed
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 bay leaf
4 strips bacon
2 onions, chopped
1 green bell pepper, seeded and chopped
2 carrots, peeled and chopped
1 (8-ounce) can tomato sauce
1 teaspoon crushed dried parsley

Cooking Directions:

1 – Place beans in a large pot, cover with water and soak overnight; drain and rinse.
2 – Add water, garlic, salt, pepper and bay leaf. Cover and simmer for 1½ hours.
3 – Meanwhile, cook bacon until crisp; remove from pan and drain on paper towel. Set aside.
4 – Add onions and bell pepper to pan drippings; sauté until tender. Add to beans along with carrots. Cover and simmer for 1 hour.
5 – Add tomato sauce and parsley. Cover and simmer an additional 30 minutes. Remove the bay leaf before serving with reserved bacon crumbled on top.
* Makes 8 servings.
http://www.cooksrecipes.com/soup/bean_and_bacon_soup_recipe.html

Bean Soup

August 14, 2016 at 4:59 AM | Posted in soup | Leave a comment
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Came across an old recipe for Bean Soup my Mom or some family member had written down and wanted to pass it along, enjoy!

 

Bean Soup
Ingredients
1 (16 ounce) package dried navy beans
7 cups water
1 ham bone
2 cups diced ham
1/4 cup minced onion
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 pinch ground black pepper
1 teaspoon roasted ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried cilantro
1 bay leaf
1/2 cup sliced carrots
1/4 cup sliced celery
Directions
1 – Place rinsed beans into a large stock pot. Add water and bring to a boil. Boil gently for 2 minutes; remove from heat, cover and let stand for 1 hour.
2 – Add ham bone, cubed ham, onion, salt, pepper, cumin, cilantro, and bay leaves. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, cover and simmer for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until beans are soft. Occasionally skim service of soup while it is cooking.
3 – Add carrots and celery, cook until tender. Remove ham bone, scrape any meat from bone and place back into soup and serve.

One of America’s Favorites – Baked Beans

August 17, 2015 at 5:14 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Baked beans over scrambled eggs on toast

Baked beans over scrambled eggs on toast

Baked beans is a dish containing beans, sometimes baked but, despite the name, usually stewed, in a sauce. Most commercial canned baked beans are made from haricot beans, also known as navy beans – a variety of Phaseolus vulgaris in a sauce. In Ireland and the United Kingdom, a tomato and sugar sauce is most commonly used, and they are commonly eaten on toast or as part of a full English breakfast.

American Boston baked beans use a sauce prepared with molasses and salt pork, the popularity of which has led to the city being nicknamed “Beantown”. Beans in a tomato and brown sugar, sugar or corn syrup sauce are a widely available type throughout the US. Canada’s Quebec-style beans often use maple syrup. This style is also popular in states bordering Canada’s Eastern provinces.

Canned baked beans are used as a convenience food. They may be eaten hot or cold straight from the can as they are fully cooked.

Baked beans are also sometimes served with chips, waffles, or the like.

 
The beans presently used to make baked beans are all native to North America and were introduced to Italy in 1528 and to France by 1547. The dish of baked beans is commonly described as having a savory-sweet flavor and a brownish or reddish tinted white bean once baked, stewed, canned or otherwise cooked. According to alternative traditions, sailors brought cassoulet from the south of France or northern France and the Channel Islands where bean stews were popular. Most probably, a number of regional bean recipes coalesced and cross-fertilised in North America and ultimately gave rise to the baked bean culinary tradition familiar today.

While many recipes today are stewed, traditionally beans were slow baked in a ceramic or cast-iron beanpot. A tradition in Maine, USA, of “bean hole” cooking, may have originated with the native Penobscot people and was later practiced in logging camps. A fire would be made in a stone-lined pit, allowed to burn down to hot coals and then a pot with eleven pounds of seasoned beans would be placed in the ashes, covered over with dirt and left to cook overnight or longer. These beans were a staple of Maine’s logging camps, being served at every meal.

Canned beans, often with pork, were among the first convenience foods and it is in this form that they became exported and popularised by US companies operating in the UK in the early 20th century. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration stated in 1996 that “It has for years been recognized by consumers generally that the designation ‘beans with pork,’ or ‘pork and beans’ is the common or usual name for an article of commerce that contains very little pork.” This is typically a piece of salt pork to add fat to the dish.

Canned baked beans with small pork sausages are still available, as are variants with other added ingredients such as chilli.

 

 

Three beanpots used for cooking homemade baked beans.

Three beanpots used for cooking homemade baked beans.

In the United States, Bush’s (Bush Brothers and Company), Van Camp’s, B&M (Burnham & Morrill Inc.), Allens, Inc., the H. J. Heinz Company, and the Campbell’s Soup Company are well-known producers or brands of packaged baked beans. B&M specializes in Boston-style baked beans often sold in beanpot-shaped jars, and canned brown bread, a traditional regional accompaniment to baked beans, whereas Bush and Van Camp produce multiple flavor varieties of canned beans, some styles using cured bacon to flavor the products.
In the New England region, baked beans are flavored either with maple syrup (Northern New England), or with molasses (Boston), and are traditionally cooked with salt pork in a beanpot in a brick oven for six to eight hours. In the absence of a brick oven, the beans were cooked in a beanpot nestled in a bed of embers placed near the outer edges of a hearth, about a foot away from the fire. Today, baked beans can be made in a slow cooker or in a modern oven using a traditional beanpot, Dutch oven, or casserole dish.

In southern states and along the eastern seaboard of the US, the beans become tangier usually due to the addition of yellow mustard. For example, the baked beans of Tennessee-based Bush’s include mustard in most of their varieties of beans. Ground beef may also become common alongside bacon in the home versions some of these bean styles. They may take on a flavor similar to Cowboy Beans, a home-mixed stew, somewhat similar to a chili but made instead with sweet baked beans.

Baked beans are a staple side dish for various types of barbecue. This is due in part to the ease of handling, as they can be served hot or cold, directly from the can, making them handy for outdoor eating. The tomato-based sweet sauce also complements many types of barbecue. The already-cooked beans may also be baked in a casserole dish topped with slices of raw bacon, which is baked until the bacon is cooked. Additional seasonings are sometimes used, such as additional brown sugar or mustard to make the sauce more tangy.

Heinz baked beans became very successful as an export to the UK, where canned baked beans are now a staple food. In America, the H. J. Heinz Co. continue to sell baked beans, although they are not always as widely distributed as competing American brands. Despite their international fame, there are currently substantial differences between the Heinz baked beans produced for the UK market (descended from the original American recipe) and the nearest currently equivalent American product (Heinz Premium Vegetarian Beans).

Beans on toast

Beans on toast

The American product contains brown sugar where the British beans do not, and the US product contains 14 g of sugar per 16 oz tin compared to 7 g for the British version (equating to 140 versus 90 calories). The US beans have a mushier texture and are darker in color than their UK counterpart. This has resulted in a situation where the product is now imported back to the brand’s home country. For several years, UK Heinz Baked Beans have been available in the US, either in different-sized cans from those sold in the UK or in a 385-gram can (the same can as the 415-gram can in the UK) with an “export” label with American English spelling and the word “baked” dropped from the title on the label. These are sold in many US specialty stores, attesting to the popularity of baked beans and their appeal to expats. Bush, Van Camp, B&M, and Heinz all produce pork-free baked beans labeled as vegetarian beans, making this American dish available to people who abstain from pork for religious, dietary, or ethical reasons.

 
In 2002 the British Dietetic Association allowed manufacturers of canned baked beans to advertise the product as contributing to the recommended daily consumption of five – six vegetables per person. This concession was criticised by heart specialists who pointed to the high levels of sugar and salt in the product. However, it has been proven that consumption of baked beans does indeed lower total cholesterol levels and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, even in normo-cholesterolaemic individuals. Some manufacturers produce a “healthy” version of the product with reduced levels of sugar and salt.

Flatulence
Baked beans are known on occasion to cause a considerable increase in flatulence following consumption; this is due to the fermentation of polysaccharides (specifically oligosaccharides) by gut flora, specifically Methanobrevibacter smithii. The oligosaccharides pass through the small intestine largely unchanged, and when they reach the large intestine, bacteria feast on them, producing copious amounts of flatus. This condition is the basis for the US children’s song “Beans, Beans, the Musical Fruit” or, in the UK, “Beans, Beans, Good for the Heart”. One of the more prominent examples of the phenomenon, in popular culture, is the campfire scene in Mel Brooks’s film Blazing Saddles, in which the cowboys’ banter is punctuated by fusillades of flatulence—an early instance of the potty humor later popularized by moviemakers like the Farrelly brothers, and a red flag to censors at the time.

 

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