One of America’s Favorites – Club Sandwich

November 12, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Club sandwich

Club sandwich

A club sandwich, also called a clubhouse sandwich, is a sandwich of bread (occasionally toasted), sliced cooked poultry, or fried bacon, lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise. It is often cut into quarters or halves and held together by cocktail sticks. Modern versions frequently have two layers which are separated by an additional slice of bread.

The club sandwich may have originated at the Union Club of New York City. The earliest known reference to the sandwich, an article that appeared in The Evening World on November 18, 1889, is also an early recipe; “Have you tried a Union Club sandwich yet? Two toasted pieces of Graham bread, with a layer of turkey or chicken and ham between them, served warm.”Several other early references also credit the chef of the Union Club with creating the sandwich.

Other sources, however, find the origin of the club sandwich to be up for debate. Another theory is that the club sandwich was invented in an exclusive Saratoga Springs, New York, gambling club in the late 19th century.

The sandwich is known to have appeared on U.S. restaurant menus as far back as 1899. The earliest reference to the sandwich in published fiction is from Conversations of a Chorus Girl, a 1903 book by Ray Cardell. Historically, club sandwiches featured slices of chicken, but with time, turkey has become increasingly common.

Club sandwich with tater tots

As with a BLT, toasted white bread is standard, along with iceberg lettuce, bacon, and tomatoes. The sandwich is traditionally dressed with mayonnaise. Variations, however, on the traditional club sandwich abound. Some vary the protein, for example, a “breakfast club” that includes eggs or a “roast beef club.” Others include ham (instead of, or in addition to bacon) and/or cheese slices. Vegetarian club sandwiches often include hummus, avocado or spinach, as well as substitute the real bacon with a vegetarian alternative. Mustard and sometimes honey mustard are common condiments. Upscale variations include, for example, the oyster club, the salmon club, and Dungeness crab melt.

The sandwich is commonly served with an accompaniment of either coleslaw, or potato salad, and often garnished with a pickle. The coleslaw or potato salad is often reduced to a “garnish” portion, when the primary accompaniment is an order of french fries or potato chips. Due to high fat and carb content from the bread, bacon and dressing, club sandwiches have sometimes been criticized as unhealthy. In 2000, Burger King came under fire for its chicken club, which contained 700 calories, 44 grams of fat (nine of them saturated), and 1,300 milligrams of sodium, as well as the trans fat from the fryer shortening.

 

Advertisements

Lunch Meat of the Week – Corned Beef

October 11, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Corned beef

Corned beef is a salt-cured beef product. The term comes from the treatment of the meat with large grained rock salt, also called “corns” of salt. It is featured as an ingredient in many cuisines.

Most recipes include nitrates or nitrites, which convert the natural myoglobin in beef to nitrosomyoglobin, giving a pink color. Nitrates and nitrites reduce the risk of dangerous botulism during curing by inhibiting the growth of Clostridium botulinum spores, but have been shown to be linked to increased cancer risk. Beef cured with salt only has a gray color and is sometimes called “New England corned beef.” Sometimes, sugar and spices are also added to corned beef recipes.

It was popular during World War I and World War II, when fresh meat was rationed. It also remains especially popular in Canada in a variety of dishes.

A corned beef on rye bread sandwich

Although the exact beginnings of corned beef are unknown, it most likely came about when people began preserving meat through salt-curing. Evidence of its legacy is apparent in numerous cultures, including ancient Europe and the Middle East. The word corn derives from Old English and is used to describe any small, hard particles or grains. In the case of corned beef, the word may refer to the coarse, granular salts used to cure the beef. The word “corned” may also refer to the corns of potassium nitrate, also known as saltpeter, which were formerly used to preserve the meat.

Corned beef on a bagel with mustard

In North America, corned beef dishes are associated with traditional Irish cuisine. However, considerable debate remains about the association of corned beef with Ireland. Mark Kurlansky, in his book Salt, states that the Irish produced a salted beef around the Middle Ages that was the “forerunner of what today is known as Irish corned beef” and in the 17th century, the English named the Irish salted beef “corned beef”.

Some say until the wave of 18th-century Irish immigration to the United States, many of the ethnic Irish had not begun to consume corned beef dishes as seen today. The popularity of corned beef compared to bacon among the immigrant Irish may have been due to corned beef being considered a luxury product in their native land, while it was cheaply and readily available in America.

The Jewish population produced similar salt-cured meat from beef brisket, which Irish immigrants purchased as corned beef from Jewish butchers. This may have been facilitated by the close cultural interactions and collaboration of these two diverse cultures in the United States’ main 19th- and 20th-century immigrant port of entry, New York City.

Corned beef hash out of the can

Canned corned beef has long been one of the standard meals included in military field ration packs around the world, due to its simplicity and instant preparation in such rations. One example is the American Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE) pack. Astronaut John Young sneaked a contraband corned beef sandwich on board Gemini 3, hiding it in a pocket of his spacesuit.

 

Easy Turkey Sausage Egg Bake

October 5, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

I have another Jennie – O Turkey Recipe to pass along to all of you; Easy Turkey Sausage Egg Bake. This one is made using JENNIE-O® All Natural* Turkey Sausage along with Florentine Egg substitute, Spinach, Skim Milk, Mustard, Whole Wheat Bread, and Cheddar Cheese. Start you morning off with a delicious and healthy Easy Turkey Sausage Egg Bake. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

Easy Turkey Sausage Egg Bake
Treat yourself to breakfast by prepping this hearty, carb-conscious bake the night before — then just hop out of bed and pop it in the oven. Under 300 calories per serving!

INGREDIENTS
1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® All Natural* Turkey Sausage
1 (15-ounce) carton Florentine flavored cholesterol-free real egg product
1 cup chopped spinach
2 cups skim milk
½ teaspoon ground mustard
5 slices whole grain 100% whole wheat bread, cut into cubes
1 cup shredded reduced-fat Cheddar cheese

DIRECTIONS
1) Cook sausage as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Drain and set aside. Whisk together eggs, spinach, milk and mustard.
2) Lightly spray 8 ramekins or 10-ounce custard cups with non-stick cooking spray. Divide the bread among the ramekins. Top with sausage and pour egg mixture (about ½ cup) into each cup. Cover and refrigerate several hours or overnight. To bake, heat oven to 350°F. Place ramekins or cups on baking sheet. Bake, uncovered, 30 minutes or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 260
Protein2 8g
Carbohydrates 12g
Fiber 1g
Sugars 4g
Fat 11g
Cholesterol 75mg
Sodium 900mg
Saturated Fat 5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/652-easy-turkey-sausage-egg-bake

One of America’s Favorites – Hot Dog

October 1, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A cooked hot dog in a bun with mustard

The hot dog or dog (also spelled hotdog) is a grilled or steamed link-sausage sandwich where the sausage is served in the slit of a special hot dog bun, a partially sliced bun. It can also refer to just the sausage (the wurst or wörst) of its composition. Typical sausages include wiener (Vienna sausage), frankfurter (or frank), or knackwurst. The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled sandwiches. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and relish, and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, chili, cheese, coleslaw, and olives. Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog’s cultural traditions include the Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile. Although schnitzel does not commonly refer to a link sausage, the fast food restaurant Wienerschnitzel is famous for its hot dogs.

These types of sausages and their sandwiches were culturally imported from Germany and popularized in the United

Carts selling frankfurters in New York City, circa 1906.

States, where the “hot dog” became a working-class street food sold at hot dog stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Hot dog preparation and condiments vary regionally in the US. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century, and emerged as an important part of other regional cuisines (notably Chicago street cuisine).

Claims about the invention of the hot dog are difficult to assess, as different stories assert different origin points for the distinction between hot dogs and other similar foods. The history of the dish may begin with the creation of the sausage, with the placing of the sausage on bread or a bun as finger food, with the popularization of the existing dish, or with the application of the name “hot dog” to a sausage and bun combination most commonly used with ketchup or mustard and sometimes relish.

The word “frankfurter” comes from Frankfurt, Germany, where pork sausages similar to hot dogs originated. These sausages, Frankfurter Würstchen, were known since the 13th century and given to the people on the event of imperial coronations, starting with the coronation of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor as King. “Wiener” refers to Vienna, Austria, whose German name is “Wien”, home to a sausage made of a mixture of pork and beef. Johann Georg Lahner, an 18th/19th century butcher from the Franconian city of Coburg, is said to have brought the Frankfurter Würstchen to Vienna, where he added beef to the mixture and simply called it Frankfurter. Nowadays, in German-speaking countries, except Austria, hot dog sausages are called Wiener or Wiener Würstchen (Würstchen means “little sausage”), in differentiation to the original pork-only mixture from Frankfurt. In Swiss German, it is called Wienerli, while in Austria the terms Frankfurter or Frankfurter Würstel are used.

Others are credited with first serving hot dogs on rolls. A German immigrant named Feuchtwanger, from Frankfurt, in Hesse, allegedly pioneered the practice in the American midwest; there are several versions of the story with varying

Grilled hot dogs

details. According to one account, Feuchtwanger’s wife proposed the use of a bun in 1880: Feuchtwanger sold hot dogs on the streets of St. Louis, Missouri, and provided gloves to his customers so that they could handle the sausages without burning their hands. Losing money when customers did not return the gloves, Feuchtwanger’s wife suggested serving the sausages in a roll instead. In another version, Antoine Feuchtwanger, or Anton Ludwig Feuchtwanger, served sausages in rolls at the World’s Fair – either at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, or, earlier, at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, in Chicago – again, allegedly because the white gloves provided to customers to protect their hands were being kept as souvenirs.

Another possible origin for serving the sausages in rolls is the pieman Charles Feltman, at Coney Island in New York City. In 1867 he had a cart made with a stove on which to boil sausages, and a compartment to keep buns fresh in which they were served. In 1871 he leased land to build a permanent restaurant, and the business grew, selling far more than just the “Coney Island Red Hots” as they were known.

In 1916, a Polish American employee of Feltman’s named Nathan Handwerker was encouraged by Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante, both working as waiters/musicians, to go into business in competition with his former employer. Handwerker undercut Feltman’s by charging five cents for a hot dog when his former employer was charging ten.

At an earlier time in food regulation, when the hot dog was suspect, Handwerker made sure that men wearing surgeon’s smocks were seen eating at Nathan’s Famous to reassure potential customers.

Common hot dog ingredients include:

Meat trimmings and fat, e.g. mechanically separated meat, pink slime, meat slurry

Hot dog garnished with ketchup and onions

Flavorings, such as salt, garlic, and paprika
Preservatives (cure) – typically sodium erythorbate and sodium nitrite
Pork and beef are the traditional meats used in hot dogs. Less expensive hot dogs are often made from chicken or turkey, using low-cost mechanically separated poultry. Typical hot dog ingredients contain sodium, saturated fat and nitrite, which when consumed in excess have been linked to health problems. Changes in meat technology and dietary preferences have led manufacturers to use turkey, chicken, vegetarian meat substitutes, and to lower the salt content.

Commercial preparation
Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.

Natural-casing hot dogs
As with most sausages, hot dogs must be in a casing to be cooked. Traditional casing is made from the small

A hot dog bun toaster

intestines of sheep. The products are known as “natural casing” hot dogs or frankfurters. These hot dogs have firmer texture and a “snap” that releases juices and flavor when the product is bitten.

Kosher casings are expensive in commercial quantities in the US, so kosher hot dogs are usually skinless or made with reconstituted collagen casings.

Skinless hot dogs
“Skinless” hot dogs must use a casing in the cooking process when the product is manufactured, but the casing is usually a long tube of thin cellulose that is removed between cooking and packaging. This process was invented in Chicago in 1925 by Erwin O. Freund, founder of Visking which would later become Viskase Companies.

The first skinless hot dog casings were produced by Freund’s new company under the name “Nojax”, short for “no jackets” and sold to local Chicago sausage makers.

Skinless hot dogs vary in the texture of the product surface but have a softer “bite” than natural casing hot dogs. Skinless hot dogs are more uniform in shape and size than natural casing hot dogs and less expensive.

Home consumption
A hot dog (wiener) is prepared and served in various ways. Reheated (for food safety purposes) by any of several

A “home-cooked” hot dog with ketchup, mustard, raw onion, fried onion, artificial bacon bits, and pickle relish

methods, it is boiled, grilled, fried, steamed, broiled, baked, microwaved, toasted, and even electro-shocked (Presto Hot Dogger). Typically it is served on a hot-dog bun with prepared mustard (and optionally with choices of many other condiments), or several may be sliced laterally into bite-size pieces and used for protein in other dishes, such as rice, beans, soup or a casserole. There are many appliances dedicated (or that lend themselves) to the reheating of wieners and the warming of hot-dog buns.

In the US, the term “hot dog” refers to both the sausage by itself and the combination of sausage and bun. Many nicknames applying to either have emerged over the years, including frankfurter, frank, wiener, weenie, coney, and red hot. Annually, Americans consume 20 billion hot dogs.

Hot dog restaurants
Hot dog stands and trucks sell hot dogs at street and highway locations. Wandering hot dog vendors sell their product in baseball parks. At convenience stores, hot dogs are kept heated on rotating grills. 7-Eleven sells the most grilled hot dogs in North America — 100 million annually. Hot dogs are also common on restaurants’ children’s menus.

Hot dogs are commonly served with one or more condiments. In 2005, the US-based National Hot Dog and Sausage Council (part of the American Meat Institute) found mustard to be the most popular, preferred by 32% of respondents; 23% favored ketchup; 17% chili con carne; 9% pickle relish, and 7% onions. Other toppings include sauerkraut, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, cheese, and chili peppers.

Condiment preferences vary across the U.S.. Southerners showed the strongest preference for chili, while Midwesterners showed the greatest affinity for ketchup.

Variations
An endless list of hot dog variations has emerged. The original king, known today as a “New York dog” or “New York style”, is a natural casing all-beef frank topped with sauerkraut and spicy brown mustard, onions optional. Sauteed bell peppers, onions, and potatoes find their way into New Jersey’s deep-fried Italian hot dog. In the midwest, the Chicago-style hot dog reigns, served on a poppyseed bun and topped with mustard, fresh tomatoes, onions, “sport peppers”, bright green relish, dill pickles, and celery salt.

Many variations are named after regions other than the one in which they are popular. Meaty Michigan hot dogs are popular in upstate New York (as are white hots), while beefy Coney Island hot dogs are popular in Michigan. Hot wieners, or weenies, are a staple in Rhode Island where they are sold at restaurants with the misleading name “New York System.” Texas hot dogs are spicy variants found in upstate New York and Pennsylvania (and as “all the way dogs” in New Jersey), but not Texas.

Some baseball parks have signature hot dogs, such as Dodger Dogs at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, and Fenway Franks at Fenway Park in Boston, which are boiled then grilled,[citation needed] and served on a New England-style bun.

The world’s longest hot dog created was 197 ft), which rested within a 198 ft bun. The hot dog was prepared by Shizuoka Meat Producers for the All-Japan Bread Association, which baked the bun and coordinated the event, including official measurement for the world record. The hot dog and bun were the center of a media event in celebration of the Association’s 50th anniversary on August 4, 2006, at the Akasaka Prince Hotel, Tokyo, Japan.

A hot dog prepared by head chef Joe Calderone in Manhattan sold for $69 during the National Hot Dog Day in 2010, making it the most expensive hot dog sold at the time. The hot dog was topped with truffle oil, duck foie gras, and truffle butter.

On May 31, 2012, Guinness World Records certified the world record for most expensive hot dog at $145.49. The

A Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion, and mustard

“California Capitol City Dawg”, served at Capitol Dawg in Sacramento, California, features a grilled 18 in all-beef in natural casing frank from Chicago, served on a fresh baked herb and oil focaccia roll, spread with white truffle butter, then grilled. The record breaking hot dog is topped with a whole grain mustard from France, garlic and herb mayonnaise, sauteed chopped shallots, organic mixed baby greens, maple syrup marinated/fruitwood smoked uncured bacon from New Hampshire, chopped tomato, expensive moose cheese from Sweden, sweetened dried cranberries, basil olive oil/pear-cranberry-coconut balsamic vinaigrette, and ground peppercorn. Proceeds from the sale of each 3 lb super dog are donated to the Shriners Hospitals for Children.

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – JILL’S FAVORITE BUFFALO BURGERS

September 26, 2018 at 5:03 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is – JILL’S FAVORITE BUFFALO BURGERS. Nothing like a good Burger. Especially when it’s a Wild Idea Buffalo Burger! The recipe uses Wild Idea Premium Ground Buffalo. I switched over to using Buffalo Meat over Beef after I was diagnosed with Diabetes 2. Not only is Buffalo healthier than Beef but its so much more delicious. If you’ve never tried Buffalo it’s time! You can find this recipe or purchase the Wild Idea Premium Ground Buffalo along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

JILL’S FAVORITE BUFFALO BURGERS
This recipe adds a little extra savoriness to the 100% grass-fed goodness!

Ingredients:
(serves 6 to 8)
2 – pounds Wild Idea Premium Ground Buffalo
2 – tablespoons olive oil

1/2 – teaspoon mustard

1 – teaspoon ketchup

1 – teaspoon thyme

2 – teaspoon salt & pepper

Preparation:
1. Mix all ingredients, but Buffalo together.
2. Add Buffalo & mix thoroughly with hands. Pat into 6 patties.
3. Place in refrigerator to firm up burgers.
4. Grill over high heat for 3 minutes each side for Medium Rare. Dan & I like to drizzle a little more olive oil over and sear for another half minute per each side for medium. This give the burgers a bit of a crust on the outside.
5. Remove from the grill, and sprinkle with a high quality finishing salt. Allow to rest for a couple of minutes before serving.

Serve on high quality buns, with your favorite toppings.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/jills-favorite-buffalo-burgers

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Classic Turkey Club

August 10, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is – Classic Turkey Club. This one uses a couple of the delicious and healthy Jennie – O products; JENNIE-O® DELI FAVORITES® GRAND CHAMPION® Reduced Sodium Oven Roasted Turkey Breast and JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Turkey Ham. It’s a Club Sandwich like no other! You can find this recipe and info on the Jennie – O products used to make this Sandwich at the Jennie – O Turkey website. So Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

Classic Turkey Club
Lunch plans are all set with this classic deli sandwich that’s ready-in-under-15-minutes. Dig in to layers of oven roasted turkey, extra lean turkey ham, crisp lettuce, fresh cucumber and cheddar cheese.

INGREDIENTS
3 slices whole-grain toast
1 tablespoon mustard
2 lettuce leaves
1 slice Cheddar cheese
2 ounces JENNIE-O® DELI FAVORITES® GRAND CHAMPION® Reduced Sodium Oven Roasted Turkey Breast, thinly sliced from the service deli
4 slices cucumber
2 tablespoons fat-free mayonnaise
3 slices tomato
1 ounce JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Turkey Ham, 20% water added, thinly sliced from the service deli

DIRECTIONS
1) Spread 1 slice toast with mustard; top with leaf lettuce, cheese, turkey and cucumber.
2) Add another slice of toast, top with mayonnaise, leaf lettuce, tomato and ham. Add remaining toast and cut into quarters.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 490
Protein 32g
Carbohydrates 43g
Fiber 7g
Sugars 8g
Fat 20g
Cholesterol 70mg
Sodium 970mg
Saturated Fat 7g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/187-classic-turkey-club

One of America’s Favorites – Maxwell Street Polish

July 9, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Pork chops and Polish sausages, with the accompanying onions, on the grill.

A Maxwell Street Polish consists of a grilled or fried length of Polish sausage topped with grilled onions and yellow mustard and optional pickled whole, green sport peppers, served on a bun. The sandwich traces its origins to Chicago’s Maxwell Street market, and has been called one of “the classic foods synonymous with Chicago”.

 

 

 

The sandwich is widely said to have been created by Jimmy Stefanovic, a Macedonian immigrant, who took over His aunt and uncle’s hot dog stand in 1939 (now called Jim’s Original) located at Maxwell and Halsted in Chicago’s old Maxwell Street market district. The Express Grill, which is located right next door to Jim’s, advertises itself as the “Original Maxwell St. Polish” on its marquee, although it arrived after Jim’s and serves almost an identical menu. Due to their virtually undivided storefronts and 24-hour service at the original Halsted Street location of both stands, Jim’s Original and Express Grill had an added element of confusion for the casual observer not attentive to the change in signage a matter of feet in distance. Despite the competition, the Maxwell Polish sausage sandwich soon grew to be one of Chicago’s most popular local offerings, along with the Chicago-style hot dog and the Italian beef sandwich.

Jim’s Original at its current location on Union Avenue

Due to the University of Illinois Chicago’s South Campus development the Maxwell Street market district was razed and the two stands moved in 2005. After decades of coexisting at the intersection of Halsted and Maxwell Streets, the two have relocated their side-by-side competition a half block east onto Union Avenue, adjacent to the Dan Ryan Expressway on-ramp at Roosevelt Road.

Maxwell Polish are a staple of hot dog stands and today are found throughout the city and suburbs, including at restaurant chains such as Portillo’s and Brown’s Chicken, and is available at most sports venues in the area serving concessions. Most of the 24-hour stands (such as the original Express Grill and its neighboring competition, Jim’s Original) also serve the pork chop sandwich popularized alongside the Polish sausage sandwich during the days of the old Maxwell Street market.

 

Maxwell Street Polish Hot Dog Stand

The main feature of the sandwich is the sausage, which is widely available in grocery and specialty retail stores throughout the Chicago area. It is typically marketed as the “Maxwell Street” variety, which is a Chicago-specific variation of kielbasa distinguished by it being typically more seasoned and made from a combination of both beef and pork. The two largest manufacturers of this particular style of Polish sausage in Chicago are Vienna Beef and the Bobak’s Sausage Company

 

Wisconsin Beer Turkey Brat

June 1, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

I’ve got another Delicious and Healthy Jennie – O Turkey Brat recipe to share with all of you, Wisconsin Beer Turkey Brat. We’ve had this a couple of times and love them! You’ll be using the JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Bratwurst with toppings of Mustard, Sauerkraut, and Fried Onions. The recipe calls for 3 cups of Beer to simmer the Brats in before grilling them. I’ve found a Light Lager Beer gives them the most flavor. You can use any Beer for it though. You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website along with all the other Delicious and Healthy recipes. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

Wisconsin Beer Turkey Brat

INGREDIENTS
3 cups beer
1 (19.5-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Bratwurst
¼ cup mustard
5 reduced-calorie hot dog buns, split
1 cup sauerkraut
½ cup fried onions

DIRECTIONS
1) In large saucepan over medium heat, bring beer to simmer. Add brats. Simmer, covered, over low heat 20 to 25 minutes.
2) Prepare grill. Cook brats as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer.
3) Spread mustard on buns. Add brats. Top with sauerkraut and fried onions.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 260
Protein 19g
Carbohydrates 23g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 5g
Fat 10g
Cholesterol 65mg
Sodium 1000mg
Saturated Fat 3g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/709-wisconsin-beer-turkey-brat

Our Best Pork and Ham Recipes

December 19, 2017 at 6:30 AM | Posted in diabetes, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the Diabetic Living Online website its Our Best Pork and Ham Recipes. Pork and Ham Diabetic Friendly Recipes like; Mustard-Maple Pork Roast, Adobo Pork Chops, and Black-Eyed Peas and Ham. Find these and more all at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

Our Best Pork and Ham Recipes
These filling pork and ham recipes are high in protein and low in carbs, making them great additions to your diabetic diet.

Mustard-Maple Pork Roast
While it seems Sunday special, this roast is simple enough for an anyday meal…..

Adobo Pork Chops
Hot chili powder, cumin, and cayenne pepper all enhance the flavor of this lively citrus marinade for pork. Steam strips of zucchini and yellow summer squash to serve along with the succulent grilled chops……..

Black-Eyed Peas and Ham
Served on New Year’s Day down South, black-eyed peas are said to bring good health and good luck in the new year……

* Click the link below to get all the Our Best Pork and Ham Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/pork/our-best-pork-ham-recipes

Turkey and Swiss Pull-Apart

December 15, 2017 at 6:13 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Passing along a second recipe from the Jennie – O Turkey website, Turkey and Swiss Pull-Apart. You’ll be using JENNIE-O® DELI FAVORITES® Hickory Smoked Turkey Breast along with a Loaf Baguette or Italian bread, Swiss Cheese, Spices, Onions, and Mustard. Grab your ingredients and heat the oven up and you’re ready to go! You can find this recipe along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH! https://www.jennieo.com/

Turkey and Swiss Pull-Apart
The best thing since sliced bread just happens to be a recipe that calls for unsliced bread. This
melt-y, kid-friendly dinner is serious finger-food — melted Swiss cheese and hickory smoked turkey baked into a baguette.

INGREDIENTS
1 loaf baguette or Italian bread
¼ cup butter, melted
½ teaspoon garlic powder
1 cup sliced Swiss cheese
1 pound thinly sliced JENNIE-O® DELI FAVORITES® Hickory Smoked Turkey Breast, from the service deli
1 red onion, thinly sliced
coarse grain mustard, if desired

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 400ºF. Without slicing completely through bread, make diagonal cuts every ½ to ¾-inch for a total of 12 to 16 cuts.
2) Mix butter with garlic powder; set aside. Place loaf on parchment paper and brush each slice lightly with garlic butter. Reserve remaining garlic butter.
3) In each slice, insert cheese, turkey breast and onion. Slowly pour remaining garlic butter over the loaf, allowing butter to go into the slices.
4) Wrap loaf with parchment, then with heavy-duty aluminum foil and loosely seal. Bake 20 to 30 minutes or until hot and cheese is melted. Serve with coarse grain mustard, if desired.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING
Calories 360
Protein 30g
Carbohydrates 14g
Fiber 1g
Sugars 3g
Fat 19g
Cholesterol 85mg
Sodium 980mg
Saturated Fat 12g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/372-turkey-and-swiss-pull-apart

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Learn Fun Facts

An Archive of Curious Facts for the Curious

angelalimaq

food, travel and musings of a TV presenter

Hankerings

From cheeseburgers to foie gras — eat what you hanker for.

Cooking Conveniently and with Purpose #LPBcooks

Relax. They never know what you actually planned to serve them...

The Wacky Spoon

- Taking you from Garden-to-Table -

Stef's Eats and Sweets

Dinner & Desserts......Made with Love

krumkaker

Cooking, baking and living in Accra: what's not to like?

Sierramichaels's Blog

Author, writer, archaeologist and traveler

Popsicle Society

It's all about you

Browsing The Atlas

Exploring one dot on the map at a time

Wellness done write

musings by melissa abbruzzese

Jenn's FasciNation

Jenn's Fascination with the F's is about family, friendships, food, fitness, farming & frugalness!

The Maple Cutting Board

Recipes from a Novice Home Cook

Pioneering For The City Woman

Cooking my way through the pioneer womans cookbook

Farm to Table to Soul

"I am easily satisfied with the very best." - Winston Churchill

Fooding-Around

Southern Food for Y'all

Ann's Tiny Life

Tiny life. Huge dreams.

AL SKOL

choosing the fit life