One of America’s Favorites – Hot Dogs

April 4, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A typical hot dog with added mustard as a condiment

A hot dog (also spelled hotdog) is a cooked sausage, traditionally grilled or steamed and served in a sliced bun as a sandwich. There are also Hot dog variants that include the corn dog and pigs in blankets. Typical hot dog garnishes include mustard, ketchup, onions, mayonnaise, relish, cheese, chili, and sauerkraut.

The sausages were culturally imported from Germany and popularized in the United States, where they were a working class street food sold at hot dog stands that came to be associated with baseball and America. Hot dog preparation and condiment styles also vary regionally across the United States. The hot dog’s cultural traditions include the Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest and Wienermobile.

Claims about hot dog invention are difficult to assess, as stories assert the creation of the sausage, the placing of the sausage (or another kind of sausage) on bread or a bun as finger food, the popularization of the existing dish, or the application of the name “hot dog” to a sausage and bun combination most commonly used with ketchup or mustard and sometimes relish.

The word frankfurter comes from Frankfurt, Germany, where pork sausages similar to hot dogs originated. These sausages, Frankfurter Würstchen, were known since the 13th century and given to the people on the event of imperial coronations, starting with the coronation of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor as King. Wiener refers to Vienna, Austria, whose German name is “Wien”, home to a sausage made of a mixture of pork and beef (cf. Hamburger, whose name also derives from a German-speaking city). Johann Georg Lahner, a 18th/19th century butcher from the Franconian city of Coburg, is said to have brought the Frankfurter Würstchen to Vienna, where he added beef to the mixture and simply called it Frankfurter. Nowadays, in German speaking countries, except Austria, hot dog sausages are called Wiener or Wiener Würstchen (Würstchen means “little sausage”), in differentiation to the original pork only mixture from Frankfurt. In Swiss German, it is called Wienerli, while in Austria the terms Frankfurter or Frankfurter Würstel are used.

Grilled hot dogs

Around 1870, on Coney Island, German immigrant Charles Feltman began selling sausages in rolls.

Others are credited with first serving hot dogs on rolls. A Bavarian immigrant named Feuchtwanger allegedly pioneered the practice in the American midwest; there are several versions of the story with varying details. According to one account, Antonoine Feuchtwanger’s wife proposed the use of a bun in 1880: Feuchtwanger sold hot dogs on the streets of St. Louis, Missouri, United States, and provided gloves to his customers so that they could handle the sausages without burning their hands. Losing money when customers did not return the gloves, Feuchtwanger’s wife suggested serving the food in a roll instead. In another version, Anton Ludwig Feuchtwanger served sausages in rolls at the World’s Fair–either the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago or the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St Louis–again allegedly because the white gloves provided to customers to protect their hands were being kept as souvenirs.

The association between hot dogs and baseball began as early as 1893 with Chris von der Ahe, a German immigrant who owned not only the St. Louis Browns, but also an amusement park.

Another claim of inventing the hot dog is told by Harry M. Stevens, an American sports concessionaire whose vendors sold German sausages and rolls to spectators at the old New York Polo Grounds during the winter. He called them “Dachshund sandwiches”, but a New York Post cartoonist “couldn’t spell dachshund, so when he drew the cartoon, he called them hot dogs.”

In 1916, a Polish American employee of Feltman’s named Nathan Handwerker was encouraged by Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante, both working as waiters/musicians, to go into business in competition with his former employer. Handwerker undercut Feltman’s by charging five cents for a hot dog when his former employer was charging ten.

At an earlier time in food regulation, when the hot dog was suspect, Handwerker made sure that men wearing surgeon’s smocks were seen eating at Nathan’s Famous to reassure potential customers.

Ingredients:

Hormel hot dogs going into a smoker (1964)

Common hot dog ingredients include:

* Meat trimmings and fat
* Flavorings, such as salt, garlic, and paprika
* Preservatives (cure) – typically sodium erythorbate and sodium nitrite
Pork and beef are the traditional meats used in hot dogs. Less expensive hot dogs are often made from chicken or turkey, using low-cost mechanically separated poultry. Hot dogs often have high sodium, fat and nitrite content, ingredients linked to health problems. Changes in meat technology and dietary preferences have led manufacturers to use turkey, chicken, vegetarian meat substitutes, and to lower the salt content.

If a manufacturer produces two types of hot dogs, “wieners” tend to contain pork and are blander, while “franks” tend to be all beef and more strongly seasoned.

Hot dogs being grilled

Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.
Commercial preparation:
Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.
Natural casing hot dogs:
As with most sausages, hot dogs must be in a casing to be cooked. Traditional casing is made from the small intestines of sheep. The products are known as “natural casing” hot dogs or frankfurters. These hot dogs have firmer texture and a “snap” that releases juices and flavor when the product is bitten.

Kosher casings are expensive in commercial quantities in the US, so kosher hot dogs are usually skinless or made with reconstituted collagen casings.

Skinless hot dogs:
“Skinless” hot dogs must use a casing in the cooking process when the product is manufactured, but the casing is usually a long tube of thin cellulose that is removed between cooking and packaging. This process was invented in Chicago in 1925 by Erwin O. Freund, founder of Visking which would later become Viskase Companies.

The first skinless hot dog casings were produced by Freund’s new company under the name “Nojax”, short for “no jackets” and sold to local Chicago sausage makers.

Skinless hot dogs vary in the texture of the product surface but have a softer “bite” than natural casing hot dogs. Skinless hot dogs are more uniform in shape and size than natural casing hot dogs and less expensive.

Home cooking hot dogs:
Hot dogs are prepared and eaten in a variety of ways. The wieners may be boiled, grilled, fried, steamed, broiled, baked, or microwaved. The cooked wiener may be served on a bun (usually topped with condiments), or it may be used as an ingredient in another dish. Various models of hot dog toasters exist that cook the hot dog and buns by toasting.

In the US, “hot dog” may refer to just the sausage or to the combination of a sausage in a bun. Many nicknames for hot dogs have popped up over the years. A hot dog can often be seen under the names of frankfurter, frank, red hot, wiener, weenie, durger, coney, or just “dog”.
Hot dog restaurants
Hot dog stands and trucks sell hot dogs at street and highway locations. Wandering hot dog vendors sell their product in baseball parks. At convenience stores, hot dogs are kept heated on rotating grills. 7-Eleven sells the most grilled hot dogs in North America — 100 million annually. Hot dogs are also common on restaurants’ children’s menus.
Condiments
Hot dogs may be served plain, but are commonly served with a variety of condiments, including ketchup, mustard, chile con carne, pickle relish, sauerkraut, onion, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, cheese, and chili peppers.

In 2005, the US-based National Hot Dog & Sausage Council (part of the American Meat Institute) found mustard to be the most popular condiment, with 32% of respondents preferring it; 23% of Americans said they preferred ketchup; chili con carne came in third at 17%, followed by relish at 9% and onions at 7%. Southerners showed the strongest preference for chili, while Midwesterners showed the greatest affinity for ketchup.

A Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion, and mustard

Condiments vary across the country. All-beef Chicago-style hot dogs are topped with mustard, fresh tomatoes, onions, sport peppers, bright green relish, dill pickles, and celery salt, but they exclude ketchup.

Many variations are named after regions other than the one in which they are popular. Italian hot dogs popular in New Jersey include peppers, onions, and potatoes. Meaty Michigan hot dogs are popular in upstate New York (as are white hots), while beefy Coney Island hot dogs are popular in Michigan. In New York City, conventional hot dogs are available on Coney Island, as are bagel dogs. Hot wieners, or weenies, are a staple in Rhode Island where they are sold at restaurants with the misleading name “New York System.” Texas hot dogs are spicy variants found in upstate New York and Pennsylvania (and as “all the way dogs” in New Jersey), but not Texas.

Some baseball parks have signature hot dogs, such as Fenway Franks at Fenway Park in Boston and Dodger Dogs at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. The Fenway signature is that the hot dog is boiled and grilled, and then served on a New England-style bun, covered with ketchup and relish. Often during Red Sox games, vendors traverse the stadium selling the hot dogs plain, giving customers the choice of adding the condiments.

Hot dogs outside North America
In most of the world, “hot dog” is recognized as a sausage in a bun, but the type varies considerably. The name is applied to something that would not be described as a hot dog in North America. For example, in New Zealand, it refers to a battered sausage, often on a stick (which is known as a corn dog in North America), and the version in a bun is called an “American hot dog”.

The world’s longest hot dog created was 197 ft, which rested within a 198 ft bun. The hot dog was prepared by

Pictured in August 2006, the world’s longest hot dog stretched 60 meters (197 ft).

Shizuoka Meat Producers for the All-Japan Bread Association, which baked the bun and coordinated the event, including official measurement for the world record. The hot dog and bun were the center of a media event in celebration of the Association’s 50th anniversary on August 4, 2006, at the Akasaka Prince Hotel, Tokyo, Japan.
An Austrian “hot dog” can use a hollowed-out baguette as the bread
In most of the world, a “hot dog” is recognized as a sausage in a bun, but the type varies considerably. The name is often applied to something that would not be described as a hot dog in North America. For example, in New Zealand a “hot dog” is a battered sausage, often on a stick, which is known as a corn dog in North America; an “American hot dog” is the version in a bun.
A hot dog prepared by head chef Joe Calderone in Manhattan sold for $69 during the National Hot Dog Day in 2010, making it the most expensive hot dog sold at the time. The hot dog was topped with truffle oil, duck foie gras, and truffle butter.

On May 31, 2012, Guinness World Records certified the world record for most expensive hot dog at $145.49. The “California Capitol City Dawg”, served at Capitol Dawg in Sacramento, California, features a grilled 18 in all-beef in natural casing frank from Chicago, served on a fresh baked herb and oil focaccia roll, spread with white truffle butter, then grilled. The record breaking hot dog is topped with a whole grain mustard from France, garlic & herb mayonnaise, sauteed chopped shallots, organic mixed baby greens, maple syrup marinated/fruitwood smoked uncured bacon from New Hampshire, chopped tomato, expensive moose cheese from Sweden, sweetened dried cranberries, basil olive oil/pear-cranberry-coconut balsamic vinaigrette, and ground peppercorn. Proceeds from the sale of each 3 lb super dog are donated to the Shriners Hospitals for Children.

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Wisconsin Beer Turkey Brat

October 22, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is a Wisconsin Beer Turkey Brat. We’ve had this a couple of times and love them! You’ll be using the JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Bratwurst with toppings of Mustard, Sauerkraut, and Fried Onions. The recipe calls for 3 cups of Beer to simmer the Brats in before grilling them. I’ve found a Light Lager Beer gives them the most flavor. You can use any Beer for it though. You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Stay Safe and Make the SWITCH in 2021! https://www.jennieo.com/

Wisconsin Beer Turkey Brat
Brats and Beer, the two ingredients needed for the perfect BBQ party, come together to make the Wisconsin Beer Turkey Brat. It’s the envy of every hot dog.

Total Time – 1 Hour
Serving Size – 4 Servings

INGREDIENTS
3 cups beer
1 (19.5-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Bratwurst
¼ cup mustard
5 reduced-calorie hot dog buns, split
1 cup sauerkraut
½ cup fried onions

DIRECTIONS
1) In large saucepan over medium heat, bring beer to simmer.
2) Add brats. Simmer, covered, over low heat 20 to 25 minutes.
3) Spray grill rack with nonstick cooking spray. Preheat grill over medium-high heat. Place dinner sausages on grill rack 4 inches from heat source. Grill approximately 16 to 18 minutes, turning occasionally. Always cook to well-done, 165°F. as measured by a meat thermometer.
4) Spread mustard on buns. Add brats. Top with sauerkraut and fried onions.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 260
Protein 19g
Carbohydrates 23g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 5g
Fat 10g
Cholesterol 65mg
Sodium 1000mg
Saturated Fat 3g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/wisconsin-beer-turkey-brat/

Oktoberfest Zinzinnati Returns September 16-19, 2021

September 16, 2021 at 10:15 AM | Posted in Festivals, Food | Leave a comment
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Oktoberfest Zinzinnati® is back, this September – with longer hours and an extra night of zelebration! The event, presented by Samuel Adams, will now open one day earlier and stay open one hour later, Thursday evening, Sep. 16 through Sunday, Sep. 19.

Expanded Oktoberfest Zinzinnati Days & Hours:
• Thursday, Sep. 16, 5 p.m.- midnight
• Friday, Sep. 17 – 11 a.m.-midnight
• Saturday, Sep. 18 – 11 a.m.-midnight
• Sunday, Sep. 19 – 11 a.m.-9 p.m .

Oktoberfest Zinzinnati, presented by Samuel Adams and Amazon, is America’s largest Oktoberfest. Oktoberfest Zinzinnati is held on 2nd and 3rd Streets, between Elm and Walnut in downtown Zinzinnati. There are many public and private parking garages downtown within walking distance of the festival site. Oktoberfest Zinzinnati showcases the rich German heritage of Southwest Ohio, as well as tasty samples of German-style music, food and beer. First held in 1976, the event has grown to be America’s largest Oktoberfest with more than 575,000 people attending each year.

According to the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, grazing gourmets created the following Statistiken with their gluttonous consumption at a previous Oktoberfest Zinzinnati. These Zahlen were gleaned from an extensive survey of Oktoberfest Zinzinnati food vendors:

87,542 metts
64,000 sauerkraut balls
24,640 potato pancakes
20,000 cream puffs
6,000 jumbo pickles
1,875 lbs. German potato salad
700 pigtails 80,500 bratwurst
56,250 sausages
23,004 soft pretzels
16,002 strudel
3,600 lbs. sauerkraut
702 lbs. Limburger cheese
400 pickled pigs feet
https://www.oktoberfestzinzinnati.com/

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Bacon Blue Burgers

August 11, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is Buffalo Bacon Blue Burgers. This one should be the Poster Food of Summertime! To make this week’s Recipe you’ll be needing Wild Idea Premium Ground Buffalo, Olive Oil, Mustard, Ketchup, Thyme, Salt, Pepper, Wild Idea Buffalo Bacon, Blue Cheese, Plum Preserves, and Hamburger Buns. In the good ole Summertime! You can find this recipe and purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Premium Ground Buffalo and the Wild Idea Buffalo Bacon along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

Buffalo Bacon Blue Burgers
The quintessential Buffalo Burger, complete with Buffalo Bacon, blue cheese and a touch of fruit preserves! This – soon to be new favorite, will have you making it again, and again and again. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

2 – 1 pound Wild Idea Premium Ground Buffalo
3 – tablespoons olive oil, plus a little more
1/2 – teaspoon mustard
2 – teaspoon ketchup
1/2 – teaspoon thyme
2 – teaspoon salt & pepper
1 – 10 ounce package Wild Idea Buffalo Bacon
6 – ounces blue cheese
½ – cup chokecherry or plum preserves, warmed
6 – hamburger buns

Preparations:

1 – Mix 2 tablespoons olive oil, mustard, ketchup, thyme, salt and pepper together.
2 – Mix above with Ground Buffalo until well incorporated.
3 – Divide into six portions and at pat out into bun size patties.
4 – In large skillet over medium high heat, add the other tablespoon of olive oil. Place buffalo bacon in pan and cook until crispy or desired doneness, turning once during cooking time.
5 – Preheat grill to high heat, 500 degrees. Ensure grill grates are clean.
6 – Brush burgers with a little oil and place on grill. Close grill lid during grilling time. Grill for 1.5 minutes then turn. Repeat again on each side, grilling for a total of 6 minutes.
7 – After the last turn, top the burgers with blue cheese. Close lid and grill for an additional 3 minutes.
8 – Remove burgers from heat, cover and allow them to rest for a few minutes.
9 – Place Buffalo Blue Burgers on bun, top with crispy bacon and drizzle with a little of the warmed preserves. Delicious!
Photo Credit: Jill O’Brien
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/favorite-summertime-recipes

One of America’s Favorites – Club Sandwich

July 26, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Club Sandwich

A club sandwich, also called a clubhouse sandwich, is a sandwich of bread (occasionally toasted), sliced cooked poultry, or fried bacon, lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise. It is often cut into quarters or halves and held together by cocktail sticks. Modern versions frequently have two layers which are separated by an additional slice of bread.

The club sandwich may have originated at the Union Club of New York City. The earliest known reference to the sandwich, an article that appeared in The Evening World on November 18, 1889, is also an early recipe; “Have you tried a Union Club sandwich yet? Two toasted pieces of Graham bread, with a layer of turkey or chicken and ham between them, served warm. Several other early references also credit the chef of the Union Club with creating the sandwich.

Other sources, however, find the origin of the club sandwich to be up for debate. Another theory is that the club sandwich was invented in an exclusive Saratoga Springs, New York, gambling club in the late 19th century.

The sandwich is known to have appeared on U.S. restaurant menus as far back as 1899. The earliest reference to the sandwich in published fiction is from Conversations of a Chorus Girl, a 1903 book by Ray Cardell. Historically, club sandwiches featured slices of chicken, but with time, turkey has become increasingly common.

As with a BLT, toasted white bread is standard, along with iceberg lettuce, bacon, and tomatoes. The sandwich is traditionally dressed with mayonnaise. Variations, however, on the traditional club sandwich abound. Some vary the protein, for example, a “breakfast club” that includes eggs or a “roast beef club.” Others include ham (instead of, or in addition to bacon) and/or cheese slices. Vegetarian club sandwiches often include hummus, avocado or spinach, as well as substitute the real bacon with a vegetarian alternative. Mustard and sometimes honey mustard are common condiments. Upscale variations include, for example, the oyster club, the salmon club, and Dungeness crab melt.

The sandwich is commonly served with an accompaniment of either coleslaw, or potato salad, and often garnished with a pickle. The coleslaw or potato salad is often reduced to a “garnish” portion, when the primary accompaniment is an order of french fries or potato chips. Due to high fat and carb content from the bread, bacon and dressing, club sandwiches have sometimes been criticized as unhealthy. In 2000, Burger King came under fire for its chicken club, which contained 700 calories, 44 grams of fat (nine of them saturated), and 1,300 milligrams of sodium, as well as the trans fat from the fryer shortening.

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – HOT DOG DAYS OF SUMMER

July 14, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is, HOT DOG DAYS OF SUMMER. Here’s some great ideas for the next time you fire the grill for Wild Idea Buffalo BRATS, HOT DOGS, and SAUSAGES. You can find this recipe and purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Hot Dogs and Sausages along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

HOT DOG DAYS OF SUMMER
No matter how you like to top your dog, the key ingredient is still the hot dog itself. Wild Idea’s skinless Buffalo Hot Dogs are made from our 100% premium grass-fed buffalo meat and organic seasonings. So, fire up the grill and spread out your favorite toppings.

Pizza Dog Topping: Pizza Sauce and melted Mozzarella. You might also want to add some Wild Idea’s Buffalo Pepperoni!

HLT: Hot Dog, Lettuce and Tomato with Mayo. Wild Idea Buffalo Bacon might be an additional tasty topping too!

Relish and Onion Dog: Pickled Relish and Chopped Onions.

Keep it Simple: Ketchup and Mustard.

Pickled Dog: Peperoncini, Pickled Jalapeños and Red Onions.

Chili Cheese Dog: Hot Dog smothered in Chili and Cheese!

Other favorite toppings: Coleslaw, Sauerkraut, and B.B.Q Sauce.
Photo Credit: Jill O’Brien
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/93332481-hot-dog-days-of-summer

 

Wild Idea Buffalo – BRATS, HOT DOGS, and SAUSAGES
All of our brats, hot dogs and sausages are made in-house from our 100% free-roaming grass-fed buffalo meat, with just the right amount of spice! The result: delicious-tasting products that are good and good for you too! What a Wild Idea! *All products are made without the use of added nitrites or nitrates, except for those naturally occurring in sea salt and celery powder.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/brats-sausages-hot-dogs

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Variable Vegetable Strata

July 5, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is a Variable Vegetable Strata. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Day Old Bread, Cooked Vegetables, Shredded Cheddar Cheese, Eggs, Cream of Mushroom Soup, Milk, Mustard, Basil Leaves, and Ground Black Pepper. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Variable Vegetable Strata
Assemble this vegetable strata several hours prior to baking. An excellent dish for brunch or supper.

Recipe Ingredients:
6 slices day-old bread
1 to 2 cups chopped cooked vegetables, your choice
1/2 cup (2 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese
6 large eggs
1 (10.75-ounce) can condensed cream of mushroom soup, undiluted
1/2 cup milk
1 teaspoon prepared mustard
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon basil leaves, crushed
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper

Cooking Directions:
1 – Grease an 8x8x2-inch (or 2-quart rectangular) baking dish. Cut bread into 1/2-inch cubes. Evenly sprinkle half of the cubes into prepared dish. Sprinkle vegetables and cheese over cubes. Sprinkle with remaining cubes.
2 – In medium bowl, beat together eggs, soup, milk and seasonings. Pour over bread-vegetable mixture. Cover. Refrigerate several hours or overnight.
3 – Bake in preheated 350°F (175°C) oven until knife inserted near center comes out clean and top is golden brown, about 50 to 60 minutes.
Makes 4 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/variable_vegetable_strata_recipe.html

Healthy Sandwich Recipes

June 2, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Sandwich Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Sandwich Recipes with recipes like Beef and Bean Sloppy Joes, Philly Cheese Steak Sloppy Joes, and Chicken Shawarma with Yogurt Sauce. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Sandwich Recipes
Find healthy, delicious sandwich recipes including steak, French dip, cheese and ham sandwiches. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Beef and Bean Sloppy Joes
This healthy copycat recipe of the comfort food classic trades beans for some of the meat to bump up fiber by 7 grams. We also cut back on the sugar and ketchup in this Sloppy Joe recipe makeover to save you 12 grams of added sugar…………….

Philly Cheese Steak Sloppy Joes
Two of our favorite comfort-food sandwiches join forces in these family-friendly dinner sandwiches. We found that softer buns make this easier to eat, and it’s all the better when wrapped takeout-style in a sheet of foil………….

Chicken Shawarma with Yogurt Sauce
The key to cooking juicy chicken without a spit in this healthy recipe is high heat and dark meat. The yogurt in the marinade gives the chicken both its tender texture and its alluring char. More yogurt in the sauce, along with crunchy cucumbers and herbs, keeps the flavors bright………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Sandwich Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18229/main-dishes/sandwiches/

One of America’s Favorites – Chicago-Style Hot Dog

April 12, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Chicago-style hot dog

A Chicago-style hot dog, Chicago Dog, or Chicago Red Hot is an all-beef frankfurter on a poppy seed bun, originating from the city of Chicago, Illinois. The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard, chopped white onions, bright green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt. The complete assembly of a Chicago hot dog is said to be “dragged through the garden” due to the many toppings. The method for cooking the hot dog itself varies depending on the vendor’s preference. Most often they are steamed, water-simmered, or less often grilled over charcoal (in which case they are referred to as “char-dogs”).

The canonical recipe does not include ketchup, and there is a widely shared, strong opinion among many Chicagoans and aficionados that ketchup is unacceptable. A number of Chicago hot dog vendors do not offer ketchup as a condiment.

Many sources attribute the distinctive collection of toppings on a Chicago-style wiener to historic Maxwell Street and the “Depression Sandwich” reportedly originated by Fluky’s in 1929 The founders of Vienna Beef frankfurters—the most common brand served today, first sold at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago—and the proprietors of Fluky’s were both Jewish, which may account for the wieners’ pork-free, kosher-style character.

A char-dog with ends cut cervelat-style

The “dragged through the garden” style is heavily promoted by Vienna Beef and Red Hot Chicago, the two most prominent Chicago hot dog manufacturers, but exceptions are common, with vendors adding cucumber slices or lettuce, omitting poppyseeds or celery salt, or using plain relish or a skinless hot dog. Several popular hot dog stands serve a simpler version: a steamed natural-casing dog with only mustard, onions, plain relish and sport peppers, wrapped up with hand-cut french fries, while the historic Superdawg drive-ins notably substitute a pickled tomato for fresh. Many vendors, including Portillo’s, offer a Chicago-style dog with cheese sauce, known as a cheese-dog.

Chicago-style hot dogs are cooked in hot water or steamed before adding the toppings. A less common style is cooked on a charcoal grill and referred to as a “char-dog”. Char-dogs are easily identifiable because very often the ends of the dog are sliced in crisscross fashion before cooking, producing a distinctive cervelat-style “curled-x” shape as the dog cooks. Some hot dog stands, such as the Wieners Circle, only serve char-dogs.

The typical beef hot dog weighs 1/8 of a pound or 2 ounces (57 g) and the most traditional type features a natural casing, providing a distinctive “snap” when bitten.

The buns are a high-gluten variety made to hold up to steam warming, typically the S. Rosen’s Mary Ann brand from Alpha Baking Company.

Chicago-style hot dog at Portillo’s

The Chicago area has more hot dog restaurants than McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King restaurants combined. A “hot dog stand” in Chicago may serve many other items, including the Maxwell Street Polish, gyros, pork chop and Italian beef sandwiches, corn dogs, tamales, pizza puffs and Italian ice. The restaurants often have unique names, such as The Wieners Circle, Gene & Jude’s, Gold Coast Dogs or Mustard’s Last Stand; or architectural features, like Superdawg’s two giant rooftop hot dogs (Maurie and Flaurie, named for the husband-and-wife team who own the drive-in). One of the most popular vendors of the Chicago-style dog are Chicago’s professional sports teams; in fact, those sold at Wrigley Field are affectionately known as “Wrigley Dogs”.

Portillo’s is the top vendor of this variation of hot dog regionally. After Portillo’s, Boz Hot Dogs (aka Bozo’s) and Scooby’s Red Hots have the most locations and thus also are top vendors of Chicago Style Red Hots.

One of America’s Favorites – Half-Smoke

February 8, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A half-smoke is a “local sausage delicacy” found in Washington, D.C., and the surrounding region. Similar to a hot dog, but usually larger, spicier, and with more coarsely-ground meat, the sausage is often half-pork and half-beef, smoked, and served with herbs, onion, and chili sauce.

Halfsmokes from Weenie Beenie

The etymology of “half-smoke” possibly comes from the original half-pork, half-beef composition, the ingredients and smoked method of preparation. Another possible explanation is that the texture and flavor is halfway between smoked sausage and a regular hot dog. Yet another explanation is that it refers to cooks cutting the sausage in half when grilling. Composition of the sausages varies by brand and some brands even make more than one kind. A half-smoke can be half pork, half beef, all beef, or anything in between. It can be steamed instead of smoked. The company thought to be the originator of the sausage, Briggs & Company, was sold by its owner, Raymond Briggs, in 1950 without clarifying the origin of the name. The products sold under the name generally have a genuine or artificial smoke flavoring and coarser texture than a regular hot dog; these are the key features that distinguish them.

The “original” half-smoke is considered to be the sausage distributed by D.C.’s Briggs and Co. meatpackers, originating in around 1950, though Raymond Briggs started selling his half-smokes in about 1930. Eventually, Briggs was sold to another meat distributor, where, by some accounts, the quality of the meat declined.

Numerous hot dog carts in Washington, D.C., sell steamed half-smokes, with those on Constitution Avenue catering to tourists and those on Pennsylvania Avenue and many other hot dog carts throughout the downtown area serving federal employees. Half-smokes are the “official dog” of the Washington Nationals. The most prominent location is often cited as Ben’s Chili Bowl in Washington’s U Street neighborhood, which has long been a center of Black Washington, and was an essential stop for President-elect Barack Obama in 2009.

Another popular location for half-smokes is the Weenie Beenie in South Arlington, Virginia, located near the Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park trail. Founded in 1950, it pre-dates Ben’s Chili Bowl. Among newer purveyors is Meats & Foods, on Florida Avenue just east of Ben’s Chili Bowl, which makes its own handmade version of the sausage.

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