One of America’s Favorites – Quick Bread

April 20, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Banana bread is a type of quick bread

Quick bread is any bread leavened with leavening agents other than yeast or eggs. An advantage of quick breads is their ability to be prepared quickly and reliably, without requiring the time-consuming skilled labor and the climate control needed for traditional yeast breads.

Quick breads include many cakes, brownies and cookies—as well as banana bread, beer bread, biscuits, cornbread, muffins, pancakes, scones, and soda bread.

“Quick bread” most probably originated in the United States at the end of the eighteenth century. Before the creation of quick bread, baked goods were leavened either with yeast or by mixing dough with eggs. “Fast bread” is an alternate name.

The discovery or rediscovery of chemical leavening agents and their widespread military, commercial, and home use in the United States dates back to 1846 with the introduction of commercial baking soda in New York, by Church and Dwight of “Arm & Hammer” fame. This development was extended in 1856 by the introduction of commercial baking powder in Massachusetts, although perhaps the best known form of baking powder is “Calumet”, first introduced in Hammond, Indiana and West Hammond, Illinois (later Calumet City, Illinois) in 1889. Both forms of food-grade chemical leaveners are still being produced under their original names, although not within the same corporate structure.

During the American Civil War (1861–1865), the demand for portable and quickly-made food was high, while skilled labor for traditional breadmaking was scarce. This encouraged the adoption of bread which was rapidly made and leavened with baking soda, instead of yeast. The shortage of chemical leaveners in the American South during the Civil War contributed to a food crisis there.

As the Industrial Revolution accelerated, the marketing of mass-produced prepackaged foods was eased by the use of chemical leaveners, which could produce consistent products regardless of variations in source ingredients, time of year, geographical location, weather conditions, and many other factors that could cause problems with environmentally sensitive, temperamental yeast formulations. These factors were traded off against the loss of traditional yeast flavor, nutrition, and texture.

Preparing a quick bread generally involves two mixing containers. One contains all dry ingredients (including chemical leavening agents or agent) and one contains all wet ingredients (possibly including liquid ingredients that are slightly acidic in order to initiate the leavening process). In some variations, the dry ingredients are in a bowl and the wet ingredients are heated sauces in a saucepan off-heat and cooled.

During the chemical leavening process, agents (one or more food-grade chemicals—usually a weak acid and a weak base) are added into the dough during mixing. These agents undergo a chemical reaction to produce carbon dioxide, which increases the baked good’s volume and produces a porous structure and lighter texture. Yeast breads often take hours to rise, and the resulting baked good’s texture can vary greatly based on external factors such as temperature and humidity. By contrast, breads made with chemical leavening agents are relatively uniform, reliable, and quick. Usually, the resulting baked good is softer and lighter than a traditional yeast bread.

Chemical leavening agents include a weak base, such as baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) plus a weak acid, such as cream of tartar, lemon juice, or cultured buttermilk, to create an acid–base reaction that releases carbon dioxide. (Quick bread leavened specifically with baking soda is often called “soda bread”.) Baking powder contains both an acid and a base in dry powdered form, and simply needs a liquid medium in which to react. Other alternative leavening agents are egg whites mechanically beaten to form stiff peaks, as in the case of many waffle recipes, or steam, in the case of cream puffs. Nevertheless, in a commercial process, designated chemical leavening acids and bases are used to make gas production consistent and controlled. Almost all quick breads have the same basic ingredients: flour, leavening, eggs, fat (butter, margarine, shortening, or oil), and liquid such as milk. Ingredients beyond these basic constituents are added for variations in flavor and texture. The type of bread produced varies based predominantly on the method of mixing, the major flavoring, and the ratio of liquid in the batter. Some batters are thin enough to pour, and others thick enough to mold into lumps.

There are three basic methods for making quick breads, which may combine the “rise” of the chemical leavener with advantageous “lift” from other ingredients:

* The stirring method (also known as the quick-bread method, blending method, or muffin method) is used for pancakes, muffins, corn bread, dumplings, and fritters. It calls for measurement of dry and wet ingredients separately, then quickly mixing the two. Often the wet ingredients include beaten eggs, which have trapped air that helps the product to rise. In these recipes, the fats are liquid, such as cooking oil. Usually mixing is done using a tool with a wide head such as a spoon or spatula to prevent the dough from becoming over-beaten, which would break down the egg’s lift.
* The creaming method is frequently used for cake batters. The butter and sugar are “creamed”, or beaten together until smooth and fluffy. Eggs and liquid flavoring are mixed in, and finally dry and liquid ingredients are added in. The creaming method combines rise gained from air bubbles in the creamed butter with the rise from the chemical leaveners. Gentle folding in of the final ingredients avoids destroying these air pockets.
* The shortening method, also known as the biscuit method, is used for biscuits and sometimes scones. This method cuts solid fat (whether lard, butter, or vegetable shortening) into flour and other dry ingredients using a food processor, pastry blender, or two hand-held forks. The layering from this process gives rise and adds flakiness as the folds of fat melt during baking. This technique is said to produce “shortened” cakes and breads, regardless of whether or not the chosen fat is vegetable shortening.

Quick breads also vary widely in the consistency of their dough or batter. There are four main types of quick bread batter:

Pancake batter is made using the stirring method

* Pour batters, such as pancake batter, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:1 and so pours in a steady stream. Also called a “low-ratio” baked good.
* Drop batters, such as cornbread and muffin batters, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:2.
* Soft doughs, such as many chocolate chip cookie doughs, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:3. Soft doughs stick significantly to work surfaces.
* Stiff doughs, such as pie crust and sugar cookie doughs, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:8. Stiff doughs are easy to work in that they only minimally stick to work surfaces, including tools and hands. Also called “high-ratio” baked good.
The above are volumetric ratios and are not based on baker’s percentages or weights.

 

Healthy Bread Recipes

April 12, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website its Healthy Bread Recipes. Homemade, Delicious and Healthy Bread Recipes. Find recipes like Whole-Wheat Strawberry Muffins, Rye Soft Pretzels, and Cinnamon-Sugar Dusted Apple Cider Donuts. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Bread Recipes
Find healthy, delicious bread recipes including easy banana bread, Irish soda bread, gluten-free and yeast free breads, and bread dough, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Whole-Wheat Strawberry Muffins
Kids in the Massachusetts Farm to School program used smart recipe swaps when they created these strawberry muffins: applesauce to replace some of the oil lowers calories, and whole-wheat flour instead of all-purpose flour brings added fiber and more nutrients…………………………..

Rye Soft Pretzels
This homemade soft pretzel recipe uses olive oil and rye flour to put a healthy, flavorful spin on the traditional version…………………………

Cinnamon-Sugar Dusted Apple Cider Donuts
Fluffy and light with a warm cinnamon flavor, you’ll be craving these homemeade donuts (with a hot cup of coffee) all fall! Because apple cider can be harder to find year-round, take advantage of when it’s “in season.” Don’t forget to make a few extra batches and freeze the donuts to enjoy when cider isn’t available…………………………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Bread Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/17915/bread/

Healthy Whole Grain Snack Recipes

February 27, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Whole Grain Snack Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Whole Grain Snack Recipes with recipes including Banana-Oat Muffins, Chocolate-Peanut Butter Energy Bars, and Healthy Blueberry Muffins. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Whole Grain Snack Recipes
Find healthy, delicious whole grain snacks from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Banana-Oat Muffins
Whip up a batch of these diabetic-friendly Banana-Oat Muffins for a quick and easy snack or add them to complete a balanced breakfast. These muffins can be eaten over several days or frozen and enjoyed for up to a month…………………………..

Chocolate-Peanut Butter Energy Bars
Dates provide all the sweetness you need for these no-bake energy bars. Each square serves up a hearty dose of protein–thanks to peanut butter and peanuts–as well as fiber from rolled oats. Kids will love the chewy bites with crunchy nuts……………………………….

Healthy Blueberry Muffins
We have reduced the sugar by 50% to make a lower-sugar, whole-grain muffin that is packed with blueberry flavor. Almond flour, rolled oats and Greek yogurt boost the protein and fiber for a satisfying breakfast treat………………………………

Click the link below to get all the Healthy Whole Grain Snack Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18695/mealtimes/snacks/whole-grain/

One of America’s Favorites – Cornbread

February 10, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Cornbread is a generic name for any number of quick breads containing cornmeal and leavened by baking powder.

Skillet cornbread

Native Americans were using ground corn (maize) for food thousands of years before European explorers arrived in the New World. European settlers, especially those who resided in the southern English colonies, learned the original recipes and processes for corn dishes from the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek, and soon they devised recipes for using cornmeal in breads similar to those made of grains available in Europe. Cornbread has been called a “cornerstone” of Southern United States cuisine. Cornmeal is produced by grinding dry raw corn grains. A coarser meal (compare flour) made from corn is grits. Grits are produced by soaking raw corn grains in hot water containing calcium hydroxide (the alkaline salt), which loosens the grain hulls (bran) and increases the nutritional value of the product (by increasing available niacin and available amino acids). These are separated by washing and flotation in water, and the now softened slightly swelled grains are called hominy. Hominy, posole in Spanish, also is ground into masa harina for tamales and tortillas). This ancient Native American technology has been named nixtamalization. Besides cornbread, Native Americans used corn to make numerous other dishes from the familiar hominy grits to alcoholic beverages (such as Andean chicha). Cornbread was popular during the American Civil War because it was very cheap and could be made in many different forms—high-rising, fluffy loaves or simply fried (as unleavened pone, corn fritters, hoecakes, etc.)
“ To a far greater degree than anyone realizes, several of the most important food dishes that the Southeastern Indians live on today is the “soul food” eaten by both black and white Southerners. Hominy, for example, is still eaten … Sofkee live on as grits … cornbread is used by Southern cooks … Indian fritters … variously known as “hoe cake”, … or “Johnny cake“. … Indian boiled cornbread is present in Southern cuisine as “corn meal dumplings”, … and as “hush puppies”, … Southerners cook their beans and field peas by boiling them, as did the Indians … like the Indians they cure their meat and smoke it over hickory coals. ”
—- Charles Hudson, The Southeastern Indians.

Types of cornbread

Home baked cornbread made with blue cornmeal

Cornbread is a popular item in soul food enjoyed by many people for its texture and aroma. Cornbread can be baked, fried or, rarely, steamed. Steamed cornbread is mushy, chewier and more like cornmeal pudding than what most consider to be traditional cornbread. Cornbread can also be baked into corn cakes.

* Baked cornbread – Cornbread is a common bread in United States cuisine, particularly associated with the South and Southwest, as well as being a traditional staple for populations where wheat flour was more expensive. In some parts of the South it is crumbled into a glass of cold milk or buttermilk and eaten with a spoon, and it is also widely eaten with barbecue and chili con carne. In rural areas of the southern United States in the mid 20th century cornbread, accompanied by pinto beans (often called soup beans in this context) or honey, was a common lunch for poor children. It is still a common side dish, often served with homemade butter, chunks of onion or scallions. Cornbread crumbs are also used in some poultry stuffings; cornbread stuffing is particularly associated with Thanksgiving turkeys.

In the United States, Northern and Southern cornbread are different because they generally use different types of corn meal and varying degrees of sugar and eggs. A preference for sweetness and adding sugar or molasses can be found in both regions, but salty or savory tastes are sometimes more common in the South, and thus favor using buttermilk in the batter or such additions as cracklins. Cornbread is occasionally crumbled and served with cold milk similar to cold cereal. In Texas, the Mexican influence has spawned a hearty cornbread made with fresh or creamed corn kernels, jalapeño peppers and topped with shredded cheese.

* Skillet-fried or skillet-baked cornbread (often simply called skillet bread or hoecake depending on the container in which it is cooked) is a traditional staple in the rural United States, especially in the South. This involves heating bacon drippings, lard or other oil in a heavy, well-seasoned cast iron skillet in an oven, and then pouring a batter made from cornmeal, egg, and milk directly into the hot grease. The mixture is returned to the oven to bake into a large, crumbly and sometimes very moist cake with a crunchy crust. This bread tends to be dense and usually served as an accompaniment rather than as a bread served as a regular course. In addition to the skillet method, such cornbread also may be made in sticks, muffins, or loaves.
A slightly different variety, cooked in a simple baking dish, is associated with northern US cuisine; it tends to be sweeter and lighter than southern-style cornbread; the batter for northern-style cornbread is very similar to and sometimes interchangeable with that of a corn muffin. A typical contemporary northern U.S. cornbread recipe contains half wheat flour, half cornmeal, milk or buttermilk, eggs, leavening agent, salt, and usually sugar, resulting in a bread that is somewhat lighter and sweeter than the traditional southern version. In the border states and parts of the Upper South, a cross between the two traditions is known as “light cornbread.”
Unlike fried variants of cornbread, baked cornbread is a quick bread that is dependent on an egg-based protein matrix for its structure (though the addition of wheat flour adds gluten to increase its cohesiveness). The baking process gelatinizes the starch in the cornmeal, but still often leaves some hard starch to give the finished product a distinctive sandiness not typical of breads made

Cornbread, prepared as a muffin

from other grains.

* Corn pone – Corn pone (sometimes referred to as “Indian pone“) is a type of cornbread made from a thick, malleable cornmeal dough (which is usually egg-less and milk-less) and baked in a specific type of iron pan over an open fire (such as a frontiersman would use), using butter, margarine, or cooking oil. Corn pones have been a staple of Southern U.S. cuisine, and have been discussed by many American writers, including Mark Twain.
In the Appalachian Mountains, cornbread baked in a round iron skillet or in a cake pan of any shape is still referred to as a “pone” of cornbread (as opposed to “hoe cakes,” the term for cornbread fried in pancake style), and when biscuit dough (i.e., “biscuits” in the American sense of the word) is occasionally baked in one large cake rather than as separate biscuits this is called a “biscuit pone.”
The term “corn pone” is sometimes used derogatively to refer to one who possesses certain rural, unsophisticated peculiarities (“he’s a corn pone”), or as an adjective to describe particular rural, folksy or “hick” characteristics (e.g., “corn pone” humor). This pejorative term often is directed at persons from rural areas of the southern and midwestern U.S. President John F. Kennedy‘s staffers, who despised Texan Vice-President Lyndon B. Johnson, used to refer to him behind his back as ‘Uncle Cornpone’ or ‘Rufus Cornpone’.

* Hot water cornbread – Cooked on a rangetop, one frying method involves pouring a small amount of liquid batter made with boiling water and self-rising cornmeal (cornmeal with soda or some other chemical leavener added) into a skillet of hot oil, and allowing the crust to turn golden and crunchy while the center of the batter cooks into a crumbly, mushy bread. These small (3-4″ diameter) fried breads are soft and very rich. Sometimes, to ensure the consistency of the bread, a small amount of wheat flour is added to the batter. This type of cornbread is often known as “hot water” or “scald meal” cornbread and is unique to the American South.

Johnnycakes on a plate

* Johnnycakes – Pouring a batter similar to that of skillet-fried cornbread, but slightly thinner, into hot grease atop a griddle or a skillet produces a pancake-like bread called a johnnycake. This type of cornbread is prevalent in New England, particularly in Rhode Island, and also in the American Midwest and the American South. It is reminiscent of the term hoecake, used in the American South for fried cornbread pancakes, which may date back to stories about some people on the frontier making cornbread patties on the blade of a hoe.

* Hushpuppies – A thicker buttermilk-based batter which is deep-fried rather than pan-fried, forms the hushpuppy, a common accompaniment to fried fish and other seafood in the South. Hushpuppy recipes vary from state to state, some including onion seasoning, chopped onions, beer, or jalapeños. Fried properly, the hushpuppy will be moist and yellow or white on the inside, while crunchy and light to medium-dark golden brown on the outside.

 

Healthy Blueberry Muffin Recipes

November 5, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Blueberry Muffin Recipes. Start the morning off right with Delicious and Healthy Blueberry Muffin Recipes with recipes including; Low-Carb Blueberry Muffins, Blueberry-Maple Muffins, and Banana-Blueberry Muffins. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Blueberry Muffin Recipes
Find healthy, delicious blueberry muffin recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Low-Carb Blueberry Muffins
Just because you’re watching carbs doesn’t mean you can’t have the classic breakfast pastry. In place of all-purpose flour, nutty almond and coconut flours make these muffins fluffy while slashing carbs. A bit of brown sugar blunts the tartness of fresh blueberries. Make these ahead for a grab-and-go breakfast for the week………………

Blueberry-Maple Muffins
Whole-wheat flour and flaxseeds give these maple syrup-sweetened blueberry muffins a delicious, nutty flavor. Compared to a traditional version of the recipe, they have four times the dietary fiber and substitute healthful monounsaturated fat (canola oil) for saturated fat (butter)………….

Banana-Blueberry Muffins
The slight acidity of buttermilk tenderizes and moistens baked goods while allowing you to cut way back on butter or oils. Here, it also lends a slight tanginess to the winning combination of bananas and blueberries……………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Blueberry Muffin Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18709/bread/quick-bread/muffins/blueberry/

Kitchen Hint of the Week!

November 5, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Making Muffins……………..

If you have trouble removing muffins from the muffin pan cups, place the muffin pan on a wet towel for two to three minutes. This helps release the muffins from the pan. Plus you can freeze them for later. Muffins freeze perfectly, so if you can’t enjoy them all on the day they’re made, wrap them in plastic wrap and put them in the freezer for later.

Healthy Apple Muffin Recipes

September 26, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Apple Muffin Recipes. Wake up in the mornings and start you day off with a Delicious and Healthy Apple Muffin Recipe. You’ll find recipes like; Apple-Cinnamon Muffins, Spiced Apple Butter Bran Muffins, and Apple-Cheddar Quinoa Muffins. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Apple Muffin Recipes
Find healthy, delicious apple muffin recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Apple-Cinnamon Muffins
These healthy apple-cinnamon muffins will put you in an autumnal state of mind no matter the time of year. Sprinkling the muffins with sugar before baking gives them a crispy top, just like a coffee-shop muffin—but these are a whole lot more nutritious than your average coffee-shop muffin, thanks to wholesome ingredients like white whole-wheat flour. Serve them for breakfast or a grab-and-go snack.

Spiced Apple Butter Bran Muffins
These muffins are dense, grainy, fruity and delicious. A double dose of apple—diced fresh apple and dark, spiced apple butter (Smucker’s brand is good)—makes them extra moist and flavorful………

Apple-Cheddar Quinoa Muffins
In this savory quinoa muffin recipe, grated apple adds moisture, quinoa adds protein and sharp Cheddar cheese makes these healthy muffins a perfect pairing for soups and stews. To make these quinoa muffins gluten-free, use a gluten-free flour blend in place of the whole-wheat flour…………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Apple Muffin Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/22809/bread/quick-bread/muffins/apple/

Healthy Muffin Recipes

July 30, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Healthy Muffin Recipes from the EatingWell website and Magazine. Healthy Muffin Recipes with recipes like; Apple-Cinnamon Muffins, Healthy Blueberry Muffins, and Berry Morning Muffin. Start your day of right with one of these Delicious and Healthy Muffin Recipes. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Muffin Recipes
Find healthy, delicious muffin recipes including blueberry, banana, chocolate chip and low-calorie muffins. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Apple-Cinnamon Muffins
These healthy apple-cinnamon muffins will put you in an autumnal state of mind no matter the time of year. Sprinkling the muffins with sugar before baking gives them a crispy top, just like a coffee-shop muffin—but these are a whole lot more nutritious than your average coffee-shop muffin, thanks to wholesome ingredients like white whole-wheat flour. Serve them for breakfast or a grab-and-go snack……………..

Healthy Blueberry Muffins
We have reduced the sugar by 50% to make a lower-sugar, whole-grain muffin that is packed with blueberry flavor. Almond flour, rolled oats and Greek yogurt boost the protein and fiber for a satisfying breakfast treat…………….

Berry Morning Muffin
These easy muffins are full of antioxidant-packed raspberries and strawberries. Walnuts provide a welcome crunch and are a great source of monounsaturated fat, which research shows lowers LDL (bad) cholesterol……………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Muffin Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18097/bread/quick-bread/muffins/

Healthy Breakfast and Brunch Recipes

June 18, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Breakfast and Brunch Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Breakfast and Brunch Recipes like; Banana-Bran Muffins, Bacon and Egg Breakfast Tacos, and Triple-Grain Flapjacks. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website and while there you can subscribe to the EatingWell Magazine. So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Breakfast and Brunch Recipes
Find healthy, delicious breakfast and brunch recipes including eggs, pancakes, muffins and pastries. Healthier Recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Banana-Bran Muffins
By the end of the week, any bananas left in the fruit bowl are past their prime—just right for these moist bran muffins. Add a handful of dark chocolate chips to entice children to enjoy a fiber-rich treat………

Bacon and Egg Breakfast Tacos
Breakfast tacos are quintessential morning eats in Austin, but with this breakfast taco recipe you can enjoy them wherever you are. The smoky, earthy ancho chile salsa is what makes these extra-special, though for a quicker weekday breakfast, feel free to swap in your favorite store-bought salsa………….

Triple-Grain Flapjacks
Cornmeal, rolled oats, and wheat flour are the trio of grains in these pancakes. Chopped dried cherries or cranberries are also good choices in place of the optional blueberries or currants…….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Breakfast and Brunch Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/17916/mealtimes/breakfast-brunch/

Healthy Quick Bread Recipes

January 24, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Quick Bread Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Quick Bread Recipes with recipes including; Low-Carb Blueberry Muffins, Double-Chocolate Pumpkin Bread, and Corn Muffins. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Quick Bread Recipes
Find healthy, delicious quick bread recipes including cornbread, soda bread, biscuits and muffins. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Low-Carb Blueberry Muffins
Just because you’re watching carbs doesn’t mean you can’t have the classic breakfast pastry. In place of all-purpose flour, nutty almond and coconut flours make these muffins fluffy while slashing carbs. A bit of brown sugar blunts the tartness of fresh blueberries. Make these ahead for a grab-and-go breakfast for the week……

Double-Chocolate Pumpkin Bread
Pumpkin bread gets a chocolatey makeover in this healthy recipe that has cocoa powder in the batter and is studded with even more chocolate in the form of melty chips. This easy quick bread is so tasty, it could pass as a dessert……..

Corn Muffins
Call on these hearty cornmeal muffins to help boost a soup, stew, chili, or salad into a filling meal……..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Quick Bread Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/22806/bread/quick-bread/

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