Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Upside-Down Pineapple Cake

May 30, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is – Upside-Down Pineapple Cake. Upside-Down Pineapple Cake just made healthier. Only 165 calories per serving! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you not only find Diabetic Friendly Recipes but also Diabetes News and Diabetes Management Tips so check it out today! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Upside-Down Pineapple Cake
Ingredients
1 can (15 ounces) pineapple slices in juice
2 tablespoons molasses
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup sucralose-based brown sugar substitute
1/4 cup margarine, melted
2 egg whites
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray 9-inch round cake pan with nonstick cooking spray.

2 – Drain pineapple; reserve 3/4 cup juice. Place pineapple rings evenly in bottom of prepared pan. Drizzle molasses evenly over pineapple. Sprinkle with cinnamon.

3 – Beat sugar substitute, margarine, egg whites, and vanilla in large bowl with electric mixer at low speed until well blended. Add reserved pineapple juice, flour and baking soda; beat until smooth. Pour batter over pineapple.

4 – Bake 30 minutes or until toothpick inserted into center comes out clean. Cool in pan on wire rack. Store leftovers in refrigerator.

Tip: For maximum flavor, let cake sit overnight before serving.

Yield: 12 servings.

Serving size: 1/12 of cake.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 165 calories, Carbohydrates: 28 g, Protein: 1 g, Fat: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 108 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/upside-pineapple-cake/

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One of America’s Favorites – Baked Beans

April 22, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Baked beans over scrambled eggs on toast

Baked beans is a dish containing beans, sometimes baked but, despite the name, usually stewed, in a sauce.] Most commercially canned baked beans are made from haricot beans, also known as navy beans (a variety of Phaseolus vulgaris) in a sauce. In Ireland and Great Britain, a tomato sauce is most commonly used, and they are commonly eaten on toast or as part of a full English, Scottish, or Irish breakfast.

American Boston baked beans use a sauce prepared with molasses and salt pork, the popularity of which has led to the city’s being nicknamed “Beantown”. Beans in a tomato and brown sugar, sugar, or corn syrup sauce are widely available throughout the US.

Canada’s Quebec-style beans often use maple syrup. This style is also popular in states bordering Canada’s eastern provinces.

Canned baked beans are used as a convenience food. They may be eaten hot or cold, straight from the can, as they are already fully cooked.

The beans presently used to make baked beans are all native to South America and were introduced to Europe around 1528. The dish is commonly described as having a savory-sweet flavor and a brownish- or reddish-tinted white bean once baked, stewed, canned or otherwise cooked. According to alternative traditions, sailors brought cassoulet from the south of France or northern France, and the Channel Islands, where bean stews were popular. Most probably, a number of regional bean recipes coalesced and cross-fertilised in North America and ultimately gave rise to the baked bean culinary tradition familiar today.

While many recipes today are stewed, traditionally beans were slow-baked in a ceramic or cast-iron beanpot. A tradition in Maine of “bean hole” cooking may have originated with the native Penobscot people and was later practiced in logging camps. A fire would be made in a stone-lined pit and allowed to burn down to hot coals, and then a pot with 11 pounds of seasoned beans would be placed in the ashes, covered over with dirt, and left to cook overnight or longer. These beans were a staple of Maine’s logging camps, served at every meal.

Canned beans, often containing pork, were among the first convenience foods, and it is in this form that they became exported and popularised by U.S. companies operating in the UK in the early 20th century. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration stated in 1996, “It has for years been recognized by consumers generally that the designation ‘beans with pork,’ or ‘pork and beans’ is the common or usual name for an article of commerce that contains very little pork.” The included pork is typically a piece of salt pork that adds fat to the dish.[citation needed]

Canned baked beans with small pork sausages are still available, as are variants with other added ingredients such as chili.

In the United States, Bush’s (Bush Brothers and Company), Van Camp’s, B&M (Burnham & Morrill Inc.), Allens, Inc., the H. J. Heinz Company, and the Campbell’s Soup Company are well-known

Beans on toast

producers or brands of packaged baked beans. B&M specializes in Boston-style baked beans often sold in beanpot-shaped jars, and canned brown bread, a traditional regional accompaniment to baked beans, whereas Bush and Van Camp produce multiple flavor varieties of canned beans, some styles using cured bacon to flavor the products.

In the New England region, baked beans are flavored either with maple syrup (Northern New England), or with molasses (Boston), and are traditionally cooked with salt pork in a beanpot in a brick oven for six to eight hours. In the absence of a brick oven, the beans were cooked in a beanpot nestled in a bed of embers placed near the outer edges of a hearth, about a foot away from the fire. Today, baked beans can be made in a slow cooker or in a modern oven using a traditional beanpot, Dutch oven, or casserole dish.

In southern states and along the eastern seaboard of the U.S., the beans become tangier usually due to the addition of yellow mustard. For example, the baked beans of Tennessee-based Bush’s include mustard in most of their varieties of beans. Ground beef may also become common alongside bacon in the home versions some of these bean styles. They may take on a flavor similar to Cowboy Beans, a home-mixed stew, somewhat similar to a chili but made instead with sweet baked beans.

Baked beans are a staple side dish for various types of barbecue. This is due in part to the ease of handling, as they can be served hot or cold, directly from the can, making them handy for outdoor eating. The tomato-based sweet sauce also complements many types of barbecue. The already-cooked beans may also be baked in a casserole dish topped with slices of raw bacon, which is baked until the bacon is cooked. Additional seasonings are sometimes used, such as additional brown sugar or mustard to make the sauce more tangy.

Heinz baked beans became very successful as an export to the UK, where canned baked beans are now a staple food. In America, the H. J. Heinz Co. continue to sell baked beans, although they are not always as widely distributed as competing American brands. Despite their international fame, there are currently substantial differences between the Heinz baked beans produced for the UK market (descended from the original American recipe) and the nearest currently equivalent American product (Heinz Premium Vegetarian Beans).

The American product contains brown sugar where the British beans do not, and the U.S. product contains 14 g of sugar per 16 oz tin compared to 7 g for the British version (equating to 140 versus 90 calories). The U.S. beans have a mushier texture and are darker in color than their UK counterpart. This has resulted in a situation where the product is now imported back to the brand’s home country. For several years, UK Heinz Baked Beans have been available in the U.S., either in different-sized cans from those sold in the UK or in a 385-gram can (the same can as the 415-gram can in the UK) with an “export” label with American English spelling and the word “baked” dropped from the title on the label. These are sold in many U.S. specialty stores, attesting to the popularity of baked beans and their appeal to expats. Bush, Van Camp, B&M, and Heinz all produce pork-free baked beans labeled as vegetarian beans, making this American dish available to people who abstain from pork for religious, dietary, or ethical reasons.

Three beanpots used for cooking homemade baked beans. The small one is glazed with the letters “Boston Baked Beans”

In the UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Brunei, Malaysia, and Singapore, the term baked beans usually refers to tinned beans in a tomato sauce. They were originally imported from American companies, first sold in the UK in 1886 in the upmarket Fortnum & Mason store in London as an expensive foreign delicacy.

Today, baked beans are a staple convenience food in the UK, often eaten as part of the modern full English breakfast and particularly on toast (called simply “beans on toast”). Baked beans freshly cooked from raw ingredients, much closer to their original unprocessed, unindustrialised form, are offered by a few upmarket brunch establishments.

The best-selling brand in the UK is Heinz Baked Beans.

 

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – APPLESAUCE CAKE

April 18, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dessert of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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I’m starting a new feature post on Thursday’s, Diabetic Dessert of the Week. For the first Dessert it’s a recipe for APPLESAUCE CAKE. Molasses, Egg Substitute, Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, and Unsweetened Applesauce are just some of the ingredients you’ll need to make this week’s recipe. It’s from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website which has a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes. So check it out today for some delicious and healthy recipes. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

APPLESAUCE CAKE

Ingredients

1 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ginger
1/2 cup reduced-calorie margarine
1/4 cup molasses
1/2 cup egg substitute
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce

Directions

1 – Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Spray an 8×8 inch metal cake pan with vegetable cooking spray. In a small bowl, stir together flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and ginger. Set aside.
2 – In a large mixing bowl, beat margarine and molasses with an electric mixer on high speed for approximately 1 minute.
3 – Add egg substitute and vanilla and blend on high speed for 30 seconds. Mixture will be liquid.
4 – Add Splenda Granulated Sweetener and beat on medium speed until very smooth, approximately 1 1/2 minutes.
5 – Add flour mixture and applesauce and beat on low speed until mixed, approximately 45 seconds.
6 – Spread batter evenly into prepared pan and bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees F.

Recipe Yield: Yield: 8 servings Serving size: 1 slice.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 170
Fat: 7 grams
Saturated Fat: 1 grams
Fiber: 1 grams
Sodium: 260 milligrams
Protein: 4 grams
Carbohydrates: 24 grams
Sugars: 10 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/applesauce-cake

One of America’s Favorites – Shoofly Pie

October 22, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Shoofly pie

Shoofly pie

Shoofly pie (or shoo-fly pie) is a molasses pie or cake that developed its traditional form among the Pennsylvania Dutch in the 1880s, who ate it with strong black coffee for breakfast. It is called Melassich Riwwelboi or Melassichriwwelkuche (molasses crumb cake) in the Pennsylvania Dutch language.

Shoofly pie is a molasses crumb cake that was baked in a pie crust. The addition of a pie crust made it easier for people to hold a piece in the hand while eating it.

It comes in two different versions: wet-bottom and dry-bottom. The dry-bottom version is baked until fully set and results in a more cake-like consistency throughout. The wet-bottom version is set like cake at the top where it was mixed in with the crumbs, but the very bottom is a stickier, gooier custard-like consistency.

A Montgomery pie is similar to a shoofly pie, except lemon juice is usually added to the bottom layer and buttermilk to the topping. Treacle tart is a pie with a filling made from light treacle.

Shoofly pie began as a crust-less molasses cake called Centennial cake in 1876, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia. In the 1880s, home bakers added a crust to make it easier to eat alongside a cup of coffee in the morning, without plates and forks. Precursors include Jenny Lind cake, a gingerbread cake from the middle of the 19th century.

Because the cake contains molasses but no eggs, historians conclude that it was typically baked during the winter, when chickens laid no eggs but when molasses would store well in the cold weather. The use of baking powder places its invention firmly after the Civil War and in the 1870s, when Pennsylvania Dutch bakers began using baking powder.

 

Diabetic Dish of the Week – APPLE AND SQUASH BAKE

September 18, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is a APPLE AND SQUASH BAKE. A perfect Fall Dish using both Apples and Butternut Squash. The Dish is only 120 calories and 20 net carbs per serving. Another Delicious and Diabetic Friendly Recipe from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. So many Delicious and Healthy recipes to choose from. Plus don’t forget to subscribe to the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine, one of my favorites! So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

 

APPLE AND SQUASH BAKE
This recipe combines all the best fall flavors and makes a great alternative to the candied yams often served for Thanksgiving dinner.
Yield: 8 servings
Serving Size: 3/4 cup squash and apple bake

Ingredients

1/3 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1 teaspoon molasses
1/4 cup light butter
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground mace
2 pounds butternut squash – peeled, seeded, and cut into
1/2 inch slices
2 large apples – cored, and cut into 1/2 inch slices

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
In a medium bowl, stir together Splenda Granulated Sweetener, molasses, butter, flour, salt, and mace. Arrange squash in an ungreased 9×13 inch baking dish. Top with slices of apple, then sprinkle with the sugar mixture. Cover with a lid or aluminum foil.
Bake for 50 to 60 minutes in the preheated oven, or until squash is tender.

Nutritional Information (Per Serving)
Calories: 120
Calories from Fat: 30
Protein: 2 g
Sodium: 340 mg
Cholesterol: 10 mg
Fat: 3.5 g
Saturated Fat: 2 g
Dietary Fiber: 4 g
Sugars: 9 g
Carbohydrates: 24 g
https://diabeticgourmet.com/articles/10-diabetic-friendly-apple-recipes-to-celebrate-autumn/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 3, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Bean dish flavor hint…….

If you’re making beans as a side dish, add a small amount of brown sugar or molasses at the end of cooking for a delicious flavor.

Gingersnap Pumpkin Cheesecake

November 12, 2017 at 6:05 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, dessert | Leave a comment
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I’m passing along a recipe I came across at the CooksRecipes website, Gingersnap Pumpkin Cheesecake. Splenda® Granulated No Calorie Sweetener replaces the Sugar in the recipe. Perfect Dessert for your Holiday Table. Again its at the CooksRecipes website which has a huge selection of recipes for all occasions. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

Gingersnap Pumpkin Cheesecake
This new and healthy version is a tasty twist of a classic recipe. The gingersnap crust offers the perfect balance to the creamy pumpkin filling.

Recipe Ingredients:

3/4 cup gingersnap cookie crumbs
3/4 cup crushed fat-free graham crackers
2 tablespoons Splenda® Granulated No Calorie Sweetener
1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted
3 (8-ounce) containers block-style fat-free cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup Splenda® Granulated No Calorie Sweetener
1 1/2 cups canned solid pack pumpkin
1 tablespoon molasses
1/2 cup nonfat evaporated milk
1/3 cup maple syrup
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
4 large eggs

Cooking Directions:

1 – Preheat oven to 325°F (165°C). Grease and flour an 8 inch springform pan.
2 – Using a fork, combine gingersnaps, graham crackers, 2 tablespoons Splenda® Granulated Sweetener, and melted butter. Press mixture onto the bottom and two inches up the sides of the pan to form the crust.
3 – With an electric mixer, beat cream cheese and 1/2 cup Splenda® Granulated Sweetener until light and fluffy. Stir in the pumpkin. Mix in the molasses, evaporated milk, maple syrup, cinnamon, allspice and vanilla. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, mixing until smooth.
4 – Pour batter into prepared crust.
5 – Bake in the preheated oven for 90 minutes, or until center of cheesecake is set. Allow to cool in pan for 30 minutes, then refrigerate overnight.
Makes 8 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/8 of recipe): Calories: 310; Calories from Fat: 100; Total Fat: 11g; Saturated Fat: 5g; Cholesterol: 130mg; Sodium: 550mg; Total Carbs: 34g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugars: 18g; Protein: 19g.

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/gingersnap_pumpkin_cheesecake_recipe.html

One of America’s Favorites – Anadama Bread

September 4, 2017 at 5:40 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Anadama Bread is a traditional yeast bread of New England in the United States made with wheat flour, cornmeal, molasses and sometimes rye flour.

It is not readily agreed exactly when or where the bread originated, except it existed before 1850 in Rockport,

Anadama bread

Massachusetts. It is thought to have come from the local fishing community, but it may have come through the Finnish community of local stonecutters.

Near the turn of the 20th century, it was baked by a man named Baker Knowlton on King Street in Rockport, Massachusetts, and delivered in a horse-drawn cart to households by men in blue smocks. In the 1940s, a Rockport restaurant owned by Bill and Melissa Smith called The Blacksmith Shop on Mt. Pleasant St. started baking the bread for their restaurant in a small bakery on Main St. They baked about 80 loaves a day until 1956, when they built a modern $250,000 bakery on Pooles Lane. They had 70 employees and 40 trucks which delivered Anadama bread all over New England.

The Anadama Bread center of consumption was in Rockport and next-door Gloucester, Massachusetts. It was commercially available from local bakeries widely on Cape Ann from the early 1900s until 1970, when the Anadama Bread Bakery on Pooles Lane in Rockport closed due to Bill Smith’s death. For a number of years, it was baked by small local bakeries at breakfast places on Cape Ann.

Put in a large mixing bowl 2 cups boiling water and 1/2 cup cornmeal. Stir thoroughly. Let stand one hour. Add 1/2 cup molasses, 2 teaspoons salt, and 1 tablespoon butter. Put in a small bowl 1/2 cup lukewarm water and 1 package yeast. When dissolved, add to the cornmeal. Stir in 4 1/2 cups flour. Beat thoroughly and let rise until double in bulk. Add enough more flour to make the dough just firm enough to knead. Shape into loaves and put into buttered pans. Let rise until almost double. Bake about 50 minutes at 350°. Makes 2 loaves. White flour will make the most “addictive” Anadama, but experiment with whole wheat, rye and other flours to make more healthful loaves.

 

 

Barbecued Chicken

May 14, 2017 at 5:42 AM | Posted in chicken, CooksRecipes | Leave a comment
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Came across a delicious and Diabetic Friendly Barbecued Chicken recipe to pass along to all of you. It’s from one of my favorite recipe sites, CooksRecipes. The Cooks site (http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html) has a large selection of recipes that will please all tastes and cuisines. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy!

 

 

Barbecued Chicken

Grilled chicken is juicier and tastes better when you brine it first—and the sweet and smoky homemade barbecue sauce is even “sweeter” without the extra calories from sugar.

 

 

Recipe Ingredients:

Barbecue Sauce:
3 cups reduced-sugar ketchup
1/4 cup SPLENDA® Brown Sugar Blend
1/3 cup cider vinegar
3 tablespoons prepared yellow mustard
3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons molasses
1 tablespoon paprika
11/2 teaspoons salt
11/2 teaspoons garlic powder
3/4 teaspoon onion powder
3/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 teaspoons liquid smoke

Chicken:
1/4 cup SPLENDA® Sugar Blend
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 cup hot tap water
3 cups cold water
1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Cooking Directions:

1 – For Barbecue Sauce: Combine all ingredients for barbecue sauce in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer 20 minutes, or until slightly thickened. (Top with a splatter guard during cooking.)
2 – Use immediately or cool, cover, and refrigerate for up to 1 month.
3 – For Chicken: Combine Splenda® Sugar Blend, salt, and hot water in 1-gallon zipper-lock bag and shake to dissolve Splenda® and salt. Add cold water and chicken. Press air out of bag, seal, and refrigerate 1 1/2 to 2 hours.
4 – Remove chicken from brine and discard brine. Refrigerate chicken until half an hour before you want to grill it (up to 1 day). Pat chicken dry with paper towels and sprinkle all over with pepper. Let rest at room temperature for 20 minutes.
5 – Heat grill to medium-high. Brush grill grate and coat with oil.
6 – Put chicken on grill, cover, and cook 5 to 7 minutes on one side. Flip chicken and brush with barbecue sauce. Cook another 5 to 7 minutes, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear (about 170°F | 80°C) on an instant-read thermometer).
7 – Coat chicken with 1 1/2 cups Sweet and Smoky Barbecue Sauce.
Makes 8 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/8 of recipe): Calories: 270; Calories from Fat: 60; Total Fat: 7g;Saturated Fat: 1.5g; Cholesterol: 70mg; Sodium: 1770mg; Total Carbs: 25g; Dietary Fiber: 1g; Sugars: 68g; Protein: 22g.
http://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/barbecued_chicken_recipe.html

Tender Spareribs Recipe w/ Mashed Potatoes and Cut Italian Beans

March 4, 2016 at 5:40 PM | Posted in Pork | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Tender Spareribs Recipe w/ Mashed Potatoes and Cut Italian Beans

 

Tender Spareribs Recipe w Mashed Potatoes and Cut Italian Beans 008
Snow Flurries outside this morning. Cleared up by late afternoon, still a cold day out though. Had a Simple Truth Breakfast Sandwich for Breakfast. I had to go back to Kroger, I had forgot a couple of items for Mom. Back home not a lot going on, just did a couple things around the house and then kicked back and did some reading. For dinner tonight I prepared a Tender Spareribs Recipe w/ Mashed Potatoes and Cut Italian Beans.

 

 

 

Tender Spareribs Recipe w Mashed Potatoes and Cut Italian Beans 001

Tried a new recipe for dinner tonight, Tender Spareribs Recipe. i came across this recipe on a Taste Of Home recipe email. I love the recipes on the Taste of Home website, (http://www.tasteofhome.com/). I can always find any recipe I need. Anyway back to the recipe, I’ll need the following to prepare the dish; 4 pounds pork spareribs (cut into serving-size pieces), 1/4 cup Low sodium soy sauce, 1/4 cup prepared mustard, 1/4 cup molasses, 3 tablespoons cider vinegar, 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce, and 1 to 2 teaspoons hot pepper sauce. That’s a fantastic combination of ingredients for the sauce! As I try to do with all recipes I used reduced calorie or low sodium ingredients when I can; La Choy Low Sodium Soy Sauce. I used the Kikkoman Low Sodium Soy Sauce, French’s Yellow Mustard, GrandMa’s Molasses, Heinz Cider Vinegar, Worcestershire Sauce, and Frank’s Hot sauce. The original recipe and web link are at the end of the post.

 

Tender Spareribs Recipe w Mashed Potatoes and Cut Italian Beans 004
To prepare the dish I started by cutting the Spare Ribs into serving size pieces. I purchased the Spare Ribs at Meijer yesterday. I then lined my Crock Pot with a liner. I always use a liner anytime I use my Crock Pot. I then placed ribs into the Crock Pot . I combined the remaining ingredients; poured over ribs. Cover and cooked on low for 6 hours. By 1:00 this afternoon the aroma of the Spare Ribs was incredible!

 

 

 

Tender Spareribs Recipe w Mashed Potatoes and Cut Italian Beans 005
At the end of 6 hours I pulled the Ribs out of the Crock Pot and they were so tender they were falling apart. The Sauce gave the Ribs incredible flavor, this combination of ingredients would go great with any of your Pork Dishes! * Near the end of the cooking time the Crock Pot passed away. I had to finish cooking the Ribs in an oven at 425 degrees. It was the older Crock Pot we had, Mom had it for 30 years!

 

 

 

 

Fried Walleye w Cut Roma Beans and Baked Roasted Fingerling Pota 003
For one side dish I prepared some Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes, which I just microwaved and serve. Just can’t beat these Mashed Potatoes. Then I also opened up a can of Allens Cut Italian Beans. I guess this our new favorite Bean. I love Green Beans but these Beans are hard to beat! I also reheated some leftover Pillsbury Italian loaf Bread . One fantastic dinner tonight! For dessert later a small cup of Del Monte No Sugar Peach Chunks.

 

 
Tender Spareribs Recipe

Ingredients
4 pounds pork spareribs, cut into serving-size piecesTaste of Home
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup prepared mustard
1/4 cup molasses
3 tablespoons cider vinegar
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 to 2 teaspoons hot pepper sauce

Directions
Place ribs in a 5-qt. slow cooker. Combine the remaining ingredients; pour over ribs. Cover and cook on low for 5-6 hours or until meat is tender. Yield: 8 servings.
Nutritional Facts
1 serving equals 460 calories, 32 g fat (12 g saturated fat), 128 mg cholesterol, 691 mg sodium, 9 g carbohydrate, trace fiber, 32 g protein.

http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/tender-spareribs

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