Chocolate Gingerbread Cookies

December 13, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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‘Tis the Season for Chocolate Gingerbread Cookies, and they are Diabetic Friendly! To make these Cookies some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are All Purpose Flour, Unsweetened Cocoa Powder, Ground Ginger, Ground Cinnamon, Light Brown Sugar, Molasses, Egg and more! The Cookies are 59 calories and 7 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Chocolate Gingerbread Cookies
These delightful, low-carb cookies combine spicy gingerbread with rich chocolate for a combination that’s sure to become a festive favorite. Use holiday-themed cookie cutters to create fun designs, or try our modified Chewy Chocolate Gingerbread Drops recipe for bite-sized treats.

Ingredients
2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
2 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon finely ground black pepper
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, softened
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon shortening
4 squares (1 ounce each) semisweet chocolate, melted and cooled
2 tablespoons molasses
1 egg
White decorating icing (optional)

Directions
Yield: About 2 dozen cookies
Serving size: 1 cookie

1 – Combine flour, cocoa, ginger, baking soda, cinnamon, salt, and pepper in medium bowl. Beat butter, brown sugar, granulated sugar, and shortening in large bowl with electric mixer at medium speed until creamy. Add chocolate; beat until blended. Add molasses and egg; beat until well blended.

2 – Gradually add flour mixture, beating until well blended. Divide dough in half. Shape each half into disc; wrap each disc tightly in plastic wrap. Refrigerate at least 1 hour.

3 – Preheat oven to 350°F. Roll out 1 disc of dough between sheets of plastic wrap to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut out shapes with 5-inch cookie cutters; place cutouts on ungreased cookie sheets. Refrigerate at least 15 minutes. Repeat with remaining dough.

4 – Bake 8 to 10 minutes or until cookies are set. Cool on cookie sheets 5 minutes. Remove to wire racks to cool completely. Decorate with icing, if desired.

* Chewy Chocolate Gingerbread Drops: Decrease flour to 1 3/4 cups. Shape 1 1/2 teaspoonfuls of dough into balls. Place on ungreased cookie sheets. Flatten balls slightly. Do not refrigerate before baking. Bake as directed. Makes about 4 1/2 dozen cookies.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 59 calories, Carbohydrates: 8 g, Protein: 1 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Cholesterol: 9 mg, Sodium: 20 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/snack/chocolate-gingerbread-cookies/

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Gingerbread Cake

December 10, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments
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I have another Diabetic Friendly Holiday Dessert to pass along, Gingerbread Cake. To make this cake you’ll be needing Unsweetened Applesauce, Molasses, Vegetable Oil, Eggs, All Purpose Flour, Splenda Granulated No Calorie Sweetener, Baking Soda, Baking Powder, Salt, Ground Ginger, Ground Cinnamon, and Ground Cloves. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Gingerbread Cake
Who can resist a warm freshly baked gingerbread cake? This is a reduced calorie version that doesn’t sacrifice flavor.

Recipe Ingredients:
2 cups unsweetened applesauce
3/4 cup molasses
1/3 cup vegetable oil
3 large eggs
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cups Splenda® Granulated No Calorie Sweetener
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

Cooking Directions:
1 – Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C). Spray Bundt pan with butter-flavored cooking spray. Set aside.
2 – Pour applesauce, molasses, and vegetable oil into a large mixing bowl. Add eggs. Stir well.
3 – Blend remaining dry ingredients in a separate bowl. Mix well.
4 – Add dry ingredients to the applesauce mixture. Stir well.
5 – Pour cake batter into prepared pan.
6 – Bake in preheated 350°F (175°C) oven 50 to 60 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove from oven.
7 – Cool cake in pan on a wire rack approximately 20 minutes. Invert cake onto serving plate. Serve warm or cool.
Makes 12 servings.

Serving Suggestions:
Serve with sautéed apples or non-dairy topping.
Place 1/2 cup Splenda® Granulated Sweetener in a blender. Blend covered, on high approximately 30 seconds. Sprinkle the finely ground Splenda over the cake like powdered sugar.
Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/12 of recipe): Calories: 170; Calories from Fat: 45; Total Fat: 5g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 35mg; Sodium: 240mg; Total Carbs: 29g; Dietary Fiber: 1g; Sugars: 11g; Protein: 3g.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/gingerbread_cake_recipe.html

CAROLINA COUNTRY STYLE RIBS

November 3, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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I have another Delicious and Healthy Dish to pass along, Carolina Country Style Ribs. To make these mouth-watering Ribs you’ll be needing Boneless Country style Pork Ribs, Apple Cider Vinegar, Water, Vegetable Oil, Molasses, Kosher Salt, Crushed Red Pepper, and Cayenne. The Ribs are 198 calories and 2 carbs per serving. So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

CAROLINA COUNTRY STYLE RIBS
Recipe for Carolina Country Style Ribs

Ingredients

1-1/2 to 2 pounds boneless country-style pork ribs
2 cups apple cider vinegar
1 cup water, cold
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons molasses, OR 1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1-1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper
1/2 teaspoon cayenne

Directions

1 – Place ribs in a large bowl or resealable plastic bag, set aside. In 4-cup glass measure, stir together vinegar, water, oil, molasses, salt, red pepper flakes and cayenne pepper until salt is dissolved.
2 – Remove 1/2 cup marinade; set aside. Add remaining marinade to ribs; seal bag and marinate for 4 – 6 hours in the refrigerator. Remove ribs from marinade; discard marinade.
3 – Prepare medium-hot fire; grill ribs over indirect heat for 50 to 60 minutes or until pork is tender and the internal temperature reaches 160F. Baste ribs twice with reserved sauce mixture during last 15 minutes of grilling.

Recipe Yield: Serves 6.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 198
Fat: 14 grams
Saturated Fat: 5 grams
Sodium: 355 milligrams
Cholesterol: 51 milligrams
Protein: 14 grams
Carbohydrates: 2 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/carolina-country-style-ribs

MINIATURE APPLE MUFFINS

October 11, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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I have a recipe for MINIATURE APPLE MUFFINS to pass along. Some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are Splenda, Molasses, Apple Juice Concentrate, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Apples, Old Fashioned Oats, Raisins, and more! Another Healthy and Delicious Recipe from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

MINIATURE APPLE MUFFINS
With the right amount of spice and a sprinkling of raisins, these bite-size muffins have the flavor of an old-fashioned apple cake.

Ingredients

3/4 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1 cup butter, softened
2 teaspoons molasses
2 large eggs
1/3 cup apple juice concentrate, thawed
2 teaspoons grated fresh lemon peel
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup peeled, shredded fresh apple
2/3 cup old-fashioned oats
1/2 cup raisins

Directions

1 – Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly spray miniature muffin pans with vegetable cooking spray; set aside.
2 – Beat Splenda Granulated Sweetener, butter, and molasses at medium speed of an electric mixer 1 minute or until blended. Add eggs, one at a time, beating until blended after each addition; add apple juice concentrate and lemon peel, beating until blended.
3 – Combine flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, soda, and salt; add to Splenda Granulated Sweetener mixture, beating on low speed just until blended. Stir in apple, oats, and raisins.
4 – Spoon batter into prepared pans; filling three-fourths full. Bake until edges are lightly browned, 12 minutes. Remove to wire racks to cool.
Recipe Yield: Yield: 36 servings

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 100
Fat: 6 grams
Saturated Fat: 3.5 grams
Fiber: 1 grams
Sodium: 125 milligrams
Cholesterol: 25 milligrams
Protein: 2 grams
Carbohydrates: 11 grams
Sugars: 4 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/miniature-apple-muffins

Boston-Style Baked Beans

October 4, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes | Leave a comment
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I have a 2nd Diabetic Friendly Recipe to pass along Boston-Style Baked Beans. This side dish is made using Navy Beans, Bacon, Onion, Yellow Mustard, Splenda, and Molasses. The Dish is 140 calories and 16 net carbs. Another winning recipe from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Boston-Style Baked Beans
A delicious formula for rich and flavorful, diabetic-friendly Boston baked beans.

Recipe Ingredients:
4 (15-ounce) cans navy beans, undrained1/2 pound bacon, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
1/4 cup yellow mustard
1/3 cup Splenda® No Calorie Sweetener, Granular
2 tablespoons robust molasses

Cooking Directions:
1 – Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).
2 – Drain navy beans and reserve 1 1/4 cups liquid.
3 – Fry bacon in a large skillet until browned. Remove bacon and reserve half of the bacon fat.
4 – Fry onion in reserved bacon fat and cook until translucent. Stir in beans and remaining ingredients.
5 – Pour beans into a 3-quart baking dish.
6 – Bake for 45 minutes.
Makes 18 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/18 of recipe): Calories: 140 Calories from Fat: 25 Total Fat: 3g Saturated Fat: 1g Cholesterol: 5mg Sodium: 520mg Total Carbs: 21g Dietary Fiber: 5g Sugars: 3g Protein: 9g.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/boston-style_baked_beans_recipe.html

Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe – Bourbon-Glazed Fruit and Nut-Stuffed Pork Roast

May 31, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe | Leave a comment
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This week’s Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe is a Bourbon-Glazed Fruit and Nut-Stuffed Pork Roast. To make this week’s recipe some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are a Boneless Single Loin Pork Roast, Dried Thyme, Light Cream, Bourbon, Chicken Broth, Molasses, Dates, Apricots, Pecans, and more! The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Bourbon-Glazed Fruit and Nut-Stuffed Pork Roast
Try your favorite stuffing rolled up in this jellyroll style pork loin. Be aware that the double-butter flied loin will cook more quickly than a solid loin. Serve with green salad tossed with vinaigrette, warm dinner rolls and steamed asparagus spears.

Recipe Ingredients:
Stuffing:
1/2 cup coarsely chopped pitted dates
1/4 cup coarsely chopped dried apricots
1/4 cup finely chopped pecans
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 1/2 teaspoons dried thyme
1 tablespoon molasses
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Bourbon Glaze:
2/3 cup bourbon
2/3 cup chicken broth
1 tablespoon molasses

Pork:
1 (2-pound) boneless single loin pork roast
1 tablespoon dried thyme

Pan Sauce:
1/4 cup light cream
1/4 teaspoon salt

Cooking Directions:
1 – Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C)
2 – For Stuffing: In a medium bowl, toss together all stuffing ingredients, set aside.
3 – For Bourbon Glaze: In a large saucepan, combine bourbon, broth and molasses; bring to a boil, remove from heat and set aside.
4 – For Pork: Butterfly (cut lengthwise almost all the way through) the pork loin. Lay open and pat flat. Starting the center of the opened loin, butterfly again on the left side. Butterfly again on the right hand side, lay open and pat flat. Evenly spread stuffing over loin. Roll the loin up, like a jelly roll, and tie securely at 2 to 3 inch intervals with kitchen twine; place in a shallow roasting pan, 4 – sprinkle with the tablespoon of thyme and pour bourbon mixture over. Roast 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until internal temperature, measured with a meat thermometer, is 150°F to 155°F (approximately 65°C), basting occasionally with bourbon glaze. Remove pork from pan, reserving the drippings; keep warm.
5 – For Pan Sauce: Add cream and 1/4 teaspoon salt to pan drippings. Cook over medium-high heat, stirring constantly, until slightly thickened.
6 – To Serve: Slice pork, removing twine as necessary, and arrange on serving platter. Serve with pan sauce.
Makes 8 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/8 of recipe): Calories 280 calories Protein 27 grams Fat 10 grams Sodium 190 milligrams Cholesterol 70 milligrams Saturated Fat 3 grams Carbohydrates 17 grams.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/pork/bourbon-glazed_fruit_and_nut-stuffed_pork_roast_recipe.html

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Wholesome Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Bars

October 10, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is a Wholesome Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Bars. Sugar Substitute, Spices, Molasses, Reduced Fat Cream Cheese, and Chocolate Chips are just some of the ingredients you’ll be needing to make this week’s recipe. There’s 110 calories and 13 net carbs per serving! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll find a huge assortment of Diabetic Friendly Recipes along with Diabetes Management Tips, Diabetes News, and much more! Plus you can subscribe to one of my favorite Recipe Magazines, the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. I left a link to subscribe to the Magazine at the end of the post. So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Wholesome Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Bars

Ingredients
1 cup white whole wheat flour
1 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 cup sugar substitute*
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1 can (15 ounces) solid packed pumpkin
2 large eggs
1/4 cup canola oil
1 container (2 1/2 ounces) puréed baby food prunes
2 tablespoons molasses
2 tablespoons packed brown sugar
4 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese
4 ounces nonfat cream cheese
2 tablespoons sugar substitute*
1/2 cup reduced-fat whipped topping
6 tablespoons mini chocolate chips

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 350°F. Coat 13×9-inch pan with nonstick baking spray.

2 – In medium bowl mix together flours, 3/4 cup sugar substitute, baking powder, baking soda, and spices.

3 – In large bowl stir together pumpkin, eggs, oil, prune purée, molasses, and brown sugar. Mix in flour mixture and stir just until combined.

4 – Spoon into pan, smooth, and bake 20 to 25 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool on rack.

5 – In small bowl beat together cream cheeses and 2 tablespoons sugar substitute. Beat in whipped topping. Spread frosting onto cooled cake and top with chocolate chips. Cut into 24 squares.

*This recipe was tested using sucralose-based sugar substitute.

Yield: 24 servings.

Serving size: 1 square.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 110 calories, Carbohydrates: 15 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 20 mg, Sodium: 170 mg, Fiber: 2 g

Exchanges per serving: 1 Bread/Starch, 1/2 Fat.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/wholesome-chocolate-chip-pumpkin-bars/


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Sunday’s Chicken Dinner Recipe – Molasses and Honey Marinated Chicken Breasts

September 29, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in chicken, CooksRecipes, Sunday's Chicken Dinner | Leave a comment
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This week’s Sunday’s Chicken Dinner Recipe is – Molasses and Honey Marinated Chicken Breasts. You’ll need Boneless and Skinless Chicken Breast Halves along with a lot of other fantastic ingredients like Coarse Grain Mustard, Whiskey, Molasses, Honey, and more! The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website which has a huge selection of recipes to please all tastes, diets, and cuisines so check it out today! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Molasses and Honey Marinated Chicken Breasts

Recipe Ingredients:
4 large boneless, skinless chicken breast halves
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
3/4 cup whiskey
2 tablespoons coarse grain mustard
2 tablespoons molasses
2 tablespoons honey
1 lime, juiced
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup chicken stock
1/4 cup butter

Cooking Directions:
1 – Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper.
2 – In small saucepan, place whiskey; boil over medium heat about 5 minutes, reducing liquid by half (all alcohol will evaporate). Remove from heat and add mustard, molasses, honey and lime juice. Stir to mix well; remove half of mixture and reserve.
3 – In remaining half, place chicken and marinate in refrigerator at least l hour or overnight.
4 – In large skillet, place oil over medium heat. Add chicken and cook, turning once, about 10 minutes or until fork can be inserted with ease. Remove chicken from skillet and keep warm.
5 – To skillet, add chicken stock and cook to reduce by two-thirds. Add reserved marinade and butter; simmer, stirring, until butter melts. Pour over chicken.

Makes 4 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/chicken/molasses_and_honey_marinated_chicken_breasts_recipe.html

One of America’s Favorites – Barbecue in Texas

July 29, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A plate of South Texas Style BBQ. Potato salad is common in Texas barbecue as a side dish.

Texas Barbecue is a traditional style of preparing meat unique to the cuisine of Texas. It is one of the many different varieties of barbecue found around the world.

Texas barbecue traditions can be divided into four general styles: East Texas, Central Texas, South Texas, and West Texas. The Central and East Texas varieties are generally the most well-known. In a 1973 Texas Monthly article, Author Griffin Smith, Jr., described the dividing line between the two styles as “a line running from Columbus and Hearne northward between Dallas and Fort Worth”.

Additionally, in deep South Texas and along the Rio Grande valley, a Mexican style of meat preparation known as barbacoa can be found. In Spanish, the word barbacoa means “barbecue”, though in English it is often used specifically to refer to Mexican varieties of preparation.

Generally speaking, the different Texas barbecue styles are distinguished as follows:

East Texas style: The meat is slowly cooked to the point that it is “falling off the bone.” It is typically cooked over hickory wood and marinated in a sweet, tomato-based sauce.
Central Texas style: The meat is rubbed with only salt and black pepper or in some restaurants with spices and cooked over indirect heat from pecan or oak wood or mesquite wood or a combination of woods. Sauce is typically considered unneeded but may be served on the side.

West Texas style: The meat is cooked over direct heat from mesquite wood.
South Texas style: Features thick, molasses-like sauces that keep the meat very moist.
The barbacoa tradition is somewhat different from all of these. Though beef may be used, goat or sheep meat are common as well (sometimes the entire animal may be used). In its most traditional form, barbacoa is prepared in a hole dug in the ground and covered with maguey leaves.

European meat-smoking traditions were brought by German and Czech settlers in Central Texas during the mid-19th century. The original tradition was that butchers would smoke leftover meat that had not been sold so that it could be stored and saved. As these smoked leftovers became popular among the migrants in the area, many of these former meat markets evolved to specialize in smoked meats. Many butcher shops also evolved into well-known barbecue establishments.

In 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson hosted a state dinner featuring barbecue for the Mexican president-elect in Johnson City, Texas. It is generally considered the first barbecue state dinner in the history of the United States.

In 2019 J. C. Reid of the Houston Chronicle wrote that pulled pork barbecue was becoming common in Texas even though the style originated elsewhere.

Regional styles
Central Texas
Central Texas pit-style barbecue was established in the 19th century along the Chisholm Trail in the towns of Lockhart, Luling, and Taylor. The German and other European immigrants who owned meat-packing plants opened retail meat markets serving cooked meats wrapped in red butcher’s paper—a tradition which continues to this day in many Central Texas towns. This barbecue style’s popularity has spread considerably around the world, especially to Southern California, New York City, Britain and Australia.

Today, many Central Texas barbecue restaurants open around 11:00am and serve until “they are out of meat”. Most barbecue establishments close on Sundays.

At a typical Central Texas pit barbecue restaurant, the customer takes a tray cafeteria-style and is served by a butcher who carves the meat by weight. Side dishes and desserts are then picked up along the line with sliced white bread, wavy-cut dill pickle chips, sliced onion, and jalapeño. Barbecue meats are commonly sold by the pound. The emphasis of Central Texas pit barbecue is on the meat—if sauce is available, it is usually considered a side dip for wetting purposes. Calvin Trillin, writing in The New Yorker, said that discussions of Central Texas pit barbecue do not concern the piquancy of the sauces or common side dishes and desserts—the main consideration is the quality of the cooking of the meats.

Smith posits this theory on why sauces are not a focus of Central Texas pit style: in the early days, the noon meat markets were dominated by the upper class purchasers, who could choose among the highest-quality cuts of meat with little interest in sauces. Smith describes many sauces in Central Texas pit barbecue as intentionally made “bland”, as compared to the flavor of the meats themselves. The sauce is typically thinner and unsweetened, different than the Kansas City and Memphis styles (which rely heavily on molasses, sugar, and corn syrup to provide thickness and sweetness).

Jayne Clark of the USA Today said in 2010 that the “Texas Barbecue Trail” is an east of Austin “semi-loop” including Elgin, Lockhart, Luling, and Taylor. Barbecue eateries in this semi-loop, like Louie Mueller Barbecue, are within one hour’s drive from Austin, in a direction of northeast to the southeast.

East Texas
East Texas barbecue is usually chopped and not sliced. It may be made of either beef or pork, and it is usually served on a bun.

Robb Walsh wrote in “Texas Barbecue in Black and White” that due to the prevalence of beef, African-American varieties of barbecue in East Texas tended to use that instead of the pork found elsewhere in the South. Walsh quoted an artist, Bert Long, who stated that African-American varieties are heavily smoked.

According to Reid, the presence of pork ribs in East Texas barbecue originated from elsewhere in the South. According to Walsh they had origins in barbecues that were held for slaves. Many black restaurateurs struggled to continue operating restaurants as food safety regulations passed by Texas jurisdictions around 1910 had restrictions on the operations of restaurants until the cinder-block pit became widespread; this innovation allowed black restaurateurs to serve their fellow black customers.

Griffin Smith, Jr., in a 1973 Texas Monthly article, described East Texas barbecue as an “extension” of barbecue served in the Southern United States and said that beef and pork appear equally in the cuisine. According to Smith, the theory on how East Texas barbecue got started was that the emphasis on sauces and spices came as African-Americans received poor quality cuts of meat and needed flavoring. According to Smith, the “finest manifestations” of the East Texas style were found in African-American-operated restaurants. Smith further described East Texas barbecue as “still basically a sandwich product heavy on hot sauce.”

 

Other styles
West Texas barbecue, sometimes also called “cowboy style,” traditionally used a more direct heat method than other styles. It is generally cooked over mesquite, with goat and mutton in addition to beef.

Barbecue in the border area between the South Texas Plains and Northern Mexico is mostly influenced by Mexican cuisine. Historically, this area was the birthplace of the Texas ranching tradition. Often, Mexican farmhands were partially paid for their work in less desirable cuts of meat, such as the diaphragm and the cow’s head. It is the cow’s head which defines South Texas barbecue (called barbacoa). The head would be wrapped in wet maguey leaves and buried in a pit with hot coals for several hours, after which the meat would be pulled off for barbacoa tacos. The tongue would also be used to make lengua tacos. Today, barbacoa is mostly cooked in an oven in a bain-marie.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Kansas City-Style Barbecue

July 15, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Kansas City-style barbecue combo plate with various meats and fries

Kansas City-style barbecue refers to the specific regional barbecue style of slowly smoked meat that originated from the pit of Henry Perry in the early 1900s in Kansas City, Missouri.

Kansas City barbecue is characterized by its use of a wide variety of meats: pork, beef, chicken, turkey, lamb, sausage, and sometimes even fish. Just about any type of barbecued meat served in the country’s other barbecue capitals, from pulled pork to brisket to beef ribs and pork ribs in a number of different cuts, is served in KC-area barbecue restaurants. Burnt ends – the crusty, fatty, flavorful meat cut from the point of a smoked beef brisket – are much in demand.

Kansas City barbecue is rubbed with spices, slow-smoked over a variety of woods and served with a thick tomato-based barbecue sauce, which is an integral part of KC-style barbecue. Most local restaurants and sauce companies offer several varieties with sweet, spicy and tangy flavor profiles, but the staple sauce tends to be both sweet (often from molasses) and spicy. Kansas City barbecue is also known for its many side dishes, including a unique style of baked beans, French fries, coleslaw, and other Southern-food staples.

The Kansas City metropolitan area has more than 100 barbecue restaurants, a number of which are nationally renowned. The area is also home to several large barbecue cooking contests, notably the Great Lenexa BBQ Battle and the American Royal World Series of Barbecue, the largest barbecue competition in the world.

History
Henry Perry
Urban Kansas City traces its barbecue history to Henry Perry, who operated out of a trolley barn at 19th and Highland in the legendary African-American neighborhood around 18th and Vine.

Perry served slow-cooked ribs on pages of newsprint for 25 cents a slab. Perry came from Shelby County, Tennessee, near Memphis, and began serving barbecue in 1908. Kansas City and Memphis barbecue styles are very similar, although Kansas City tends to use more sauce and a wider variety of meats. Perry’s sauce had a somewhat harsh, peppery flavor.

Perry’s restaurant became a major cultural point during the heyday of Kansas City Jazz during the “wide-open” days of Tom Pendergast in the 1920s and 1930s.

Arthur Bryant

Arthur Bryant’s Barbecue at 18th and Brooklyn in Kansas City

Working for Henry Perry was Charlie Bryant, who, in turn, brought his brother, Arthur Bryant, into the business. Charlie took over the Perry restaurant in 1940 after Perry died. Arthur then took over his brother’s business in 1946, and the restaurant was renamed Arthur Bryant’s.

Arthur Bryant’s, which eventually moved to 1727 Brooklyn in the same neighborhood, became a stomping ground for baseball fans and players in the 1950s and 1960s, because of its close proximity to Municipal Stadium, where the Athletics or A’s played their home games during that period.

In April 1972, Kansas City native Calvin Trillin wrote an article in Playboy proclaiming Bryant’s to be the best restaurant on the planet.

Despite new-found fame, Bryant did not change the restaurant’s very simple decor, which consisted of fluorescent lighting, formica tables, and five-gallon jars of sauce displayed in the windows, even as Presidents Harry Truman, Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan stopped by.

Bryant died of a heart attack, in a bed that he kept at the restaurant, shortly after Christmas of 1982. The restaurant is still open. The sauce and restaurant continue their success.

Along the main inner wall of the restaurant is photographic history of many famous politicians, actors, actresses and sports figures and other tribute pictures of military personnel displaying Arthur Bryant’s memorabilia such as shirts or bottles of sauce.

Gates Bar-B-Q headquarters on Brush Creek in Kansas City

Gates & Sons
In 1946 Arthur Pinkard, who was a cook for Perry, joined with George Gates to form Gates and Sons Bar-B-Q. The restaurant was situated initially in the same neighborhood.

Gates barbecue sauce does not contain molasses; the ingredients, as listed on the bottle, are: “Tomatoes, vinegar, salt, sugar, celery, garlic, spices, and pepper. 1/10 of 1% potassium sorbate preservative added.” It is available in Original Classic, Mild, Sweet & Mild, and Extra Hot varieties.

Gates also expanded its footprint in a more conventional way, with restaurants all displaying certain trademarks – red-roofed buildings, a recognizable logo (a strutting man clad in tuxedo and top hat) and the customary “Hi, May I Help You?” greeting belted out by its employees as patrons enter.

Gates has opened restaurants throughout the Kansas City metropolitan area. The chain currently consists of 6 area Gates Bar-B-Q restaurants: 4 in Missouri, 2 in Kansas. Gates also has sold barbecue sandwiches at Kauffman Stadium during Kansas City Royals home games, and currently at Arrowhead Stadium during Kansas City Chiefs home games.

Fiorella’s Jack Stack Barbecue
Fiorella’s Jack Stack Barbecue had its beginnings as the second restaurant in the Smokestack BBQ chain, which Russ Fiorella, Sr. had started in 1957. Fiorella’s eldest son Jack worked with his father until 1974, when he and his wife Delores opened their own Smokestack location in the Martin City neighborhood of south Kansas City.

Eventually Jack, along with his wife and children, decided to expand their menu selections, adding non-traditional barbecue menu items like hickory-grilled steaks, lamb ribs, Crown Prime Beef Short Ribs, and fresh, hickory-grilled seafood, along with an extensive wine and bar selection. They also began offering a higher level of comfort and service than most people were accustomed to at a barbecue restaurant. Smokestack BBQ in Martin City soon became one of the most successful restaurants in the Kansas City metro. In 1996, Jack Fiorella was named Restaurateur of the Year by the Greater Kansas City Restaurant Association.

By the mid-1990s, Jack Fiorella decided to replicate the success of his Martin City Smokestack restaurant. Other members of the Fiorella family told Jack that he was not permitted to use the Smokestack name for his new restaurant, so both the new restaurant (opened in 1997 in Overland Park, Kansas) and Jack’s existing restaurant in Martin City dropped the Smokestack name and were rebranded as Fiorella’s Jack Stack Barbecue. They also opened a full-service catering operation in Martin City and their third location in the historic Freight House building in the Crossroads Arts District. They began shipping their barbecue nationwide in 2000, and in October 2006 they opened a fourth location on The Country Club Plaza. In 2014, a fifth Jack Stack restaurant opened in Lee’s Summit, Missouri. The original Smokestack chain closed its last remaining location in 2012.

Fiorella’s Jack Stack Barbecue has been featured on The Food Network and The History Channel, and has been rated as among the best barbecue in the United States by several national organizations and magazines. Most notably, the Zagat Survey has named it the “#1 Barbecue House in the Country.”

The original Joe’s Kansas City Bar-B-Que in Kansas City, Kansas

Joe’s Kansas City
Joe’s Kansas City Bar-B-Que can be traced to competition barbecue and the Kansas City Barbeque Society (KCBS). Accompanying friends at the American Royal and The Great Lenexa BBQ Battle inspired Jeff Stehney to start cooking on his own. The first smoker purchased was an Oklahoma Joe’s 24” smoker, christened in April 1991.

By 1993, Jeff, his wife and business partner Joy, and Jim “Thurston” Howell were ready to make their mark on the KCBS competition circuit. Their competition team, Slaughterhouse Five, ended up winning eight Grand Championships, including the prestigious American Royal BBQ, three Reserve Grand Championships, and the KCBS’s Grand Champion “Team of the Year” in 1993. Over the next several seasons Slaughterhouse Five won dozens more awards and was generally recognized as one of the top competition BBQ teams in the Country.

Jeff and Joy opened Oklahoma Joe’s Bar-B-Que (later renamed to Joe’s Kansas City Bar-B-Que) in a gas station in Kansas City, Kansas in 1996. There are also locations in Olathe, Kansas and Leawood, Kansas.

Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain listed Joe’s original Kansas City, Kansas location as one of “13 Places You Must Eat Before You Die”. Men’s Health magazine named it America’s manliest restaurant. Joe’s was featured on Season 3 of Man v. Food in August 2010. It was also named “Kansas City’s Best Barbecue” by Zagat.

LC’s Bar-B-Q
Mississippi born L.C. Richardson took early retirement as a company chef for Farmland Industries and opened LC’s Bar-B-Q near the Truman Sports Complex in 1986. LC’s specializes in burnt ends and ribs, and utilizes a sauce similar to Gates’ but with substantially less sugar and more vinegar. LC’s also sauces the meat prior to smoking and continually saucing throughout the cooking process. This technique forms a thin, chewy and extremely flavorful layer on the outside of the meat and effectively seals the ribs, resulting in a remarkably tender and juicy finished product. LC’s side dishes, especially the baked beans and the fresh-cut fries, are almost as notable as the meats. LC’s Bar-B-Q has also been featured on the Travel Channel’s, “Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations”.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ
In October 1990, after leaving a sales job, Lindsay Shannon and his wife Jo opened B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ in south Kansas City. The main focus of B.B.’s is Kansas City style barbecue and Louisiana dishes. The menu includes Kansas City favorites like ribs, sausage and pulled pork, which are slow-smoked in a 60-year-old pit with apple wood. The Louisiana dishes include gumbo, jambalaya, and goulash. Not long after opening in October 1990, owner Lindsay Shannon decided to add another one of his passions: blues music. Local and national blues bands perform at B.B.’s six nights a week. B.B.’s is known as “where barbecue meets the blues” in Kansas City. B.B.’s has been featured in the New York Times, and USA Today. About.com lists B.B.’s in the Top 5 Barbeque Restaurants in Kansas City. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ has also been featured on Food Network’s, ” Diners, Drive Ins, and Dives “, hosted by Guy Fieri.

KC Masterpiece
In 1977, Rich Davis capitalized on the reputation of Kansas City barbecue to form KC Masterpiece, which evolved from his “K.C. Soul Style Barbecue Sauce”. KC Masterpiece is sweeter and thicker than many of the traditional Kansas City sauces served in the region. The KC Masterpiece recipe uses extra molasses to achieve its thick, sweet character.[citation needed]

KC Masterpiece was sold to the Kingsford division of Clorox in 1986 and now claims to be the number one premium barbecue brand in the U.S. When Davis sold the rights to his sauce to Kingsford, he announced plans to build a franchise of barbecue restaurants. The franchises were successful for a few years, but have since all closed.

Curt’s Famous Meats storefront

Curt’s Famous Meats

Curt’s Famous Meats is a meat market founded in 1947 by Curtis Jones and sold to Donna Pittman in 1989. With clientele from all across America, Curt’s specializes in barbecue prepared with Kansas City rub. It has a long history of award winning barbecue, having won eight times the American Royal barbecue competition, the largest in the world. Curt’s is located on East Truman Road in the Maywood neighborhood of Independence, Missouri. Although not in Kansas City proper, Curt’s has been a large competitor in many local competitions in barbecue. Curt’s Famous Meats is also known for its predominantly female staff that Donna Pittman has hired. They are known locally as the Lady Meat Cutters.

Kansas City Barbeque Society
The Kansas City Barbeque Society (KCBS) was founded in 1986. With over 13,000 members worldwide, it is the world’s largest organization of barbecue and grilling enthusiasts. KCBS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to “promoting barbecue as America’s cuisine and having fun while doing so.”

KCBS sanctions nearly 300 barbecue contests across the U.S. each year and offers assistance to civic and charitable organizations with producing these events. The KCBS has developed a set of rules and regulations that govern all official KCBS competitions.

KCBS offers educational programs, consultation services and civic organization presentations to help spread the gospel of barbecue. The mission of the Kansas City Barbeque Society is to celebrate, teach, preserve and promote barbecue as a culinary technique, sport and art form.

 

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