Diabetic Dessert of the Week – GINGER SNAPS

September 1, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dessert of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is GINGER SNAPS. To make this recipe you’ll be needing Granulated Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Sugar, Unsalted Butter, Molasses, Canola Oil, Egg Substitute, All Purpose Flour, Baking Soda, Ground Ginger, Ground Cloves, and Cinnamon. There’s 110 calories and 16 carbs per serving (2 cookies). So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

GINGER SNAPS
Enjoy the aroma of these heavily spiced ginger cookies while they bake. For best results, allow to cool for a few hours in the fridge. Recipe for Ginger Snaps from our Desserts recipe section.

Ingredients

2/3 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
3/4 cup sugar
2/3 cup unsalted butter
1/3 cup molasses*
2 tablespoons canola oil
1/4 cup egg substitute
3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
8 teaspoons ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
2 teaspoons cinnamon
*Use Robust Molasses for a more robust molasses flavor.

**Cookie Dough can also be rolled out and cut into circles or shapes.

Directions

1 – Mix Splenda Granulated Sweetener, sugar, butter, molasses and oil together in a medium mixing bowl. Mix on medium speed until creamy. Scrape sides of the bowl. Add egg and mix well. Add remaining ingredients and mix until blended.
2 – Divide dough in half. Roll into logs approx. 1 1/2 inches wide and 14 inches long. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 3 hours or freeze for 1 1/2 hours or until firm.
3 – Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly oil cookie sheets.
4 – Slice cookies approx. 1/4 inch thick. ** Place on prepared sheets.
5 – Bake 10-12 minutes or until bottoms are lightly browned.
NOTES:
Enjoy the aroma of these heavily spiced ginger cookies while they bake. For best results, allow to cool for a few hours in the fridge.

Recipe Yield: Yield: 36 servings
Serving Size: 2 cookies

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 110
Fat: 4.5 grams
Saturated Fat: 2 grams
Sodium: 75 milligrams
Cholesterol: 10 milligrams
Protein: 2 grams
Carbohydrates: 16 grams
Sugars: 7 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/ginger-snaps

Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – APPLE AND SQUASH BAKE

August 7, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is a APPLE AND SQUASH BAKE. A perfect Side Dish using both Apples and Butternut Squash. To make this Dish you’ll be needing Granulated Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Molasses, Light Butter, All Purpose Flour, Salt, Granulated Mace, Butternut Squash, and Large Apples. The Dish is only 120 calories and 20 net carbs per serving. So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

APPLE AND SQUASH BAKE
Yield: 8 servings
Serving Size: 3/4 cup squash and apple bake

Ingredients
1/3 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1 teaspoon molasses
1/4 cup light butter
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground mace
2 pounds butternut squash – peeled, seeded, and cut into
1/2 inch slices
2 large apples – cored, and cut into 1/2 inch slices

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
2 – In a medium bowl, stir together Splenda Granulated Sweetener, molasses, butter, flour, salt, and mace. Arrange squash in an ungreased 9×13 inch baking dish. Top with slices of apple, then sprinkle with the sugar mixture. Cover with a lid or aluminum foil.
3 – Bake for 50 to 60 minutes in the preheated oven, or until squash is tender.

Nutritional Information (Per Serving)
Calories: 120
Calories from Fat: 30
Protein: 2 g
Sodium: 340 mg
Cholesterol: 10 mg
Fat: 3.5 g
Saturated Fat: 2 g
Dietary Fiber: 4 g
Sugars: 9 g
Carbohydrates: 24 g
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/apple-and-squash-bake

One of America’s Favorites – Baked Beans

July 4, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Baked beans over scrambled eggs on toast

Baked beans is a dish traditionally containing white beans that are parboiled and then, in the US, baked in sauce at low temperature for a lengthy period. In the United Kingdom, the dish is sometimes baked, but usually stewed in sauce. Canned baked beans are not baked, but are cooked through a steam process.

Baked beans originate in Native American cuisine, and are made from beans indigenous to the Americas. The dish was adopted and adapted by English colonists in New England in the 17th century and, through cookbooks published in the 19th century, spread to other regions of the United States and into Canada. Today, in the New England region of the United States, a variety of indigenous legumes are used in restaurants or in the home, such as Jacob’s cattle, soldier beans, yellow-eyed beans, and navy beans (also known as native beans).

Originally, Native Americans sweetened baked beans with maple syrup, a tradition some recipes still follow, but some English colonists used brown sugar beginning in the 17th century. In the 18th century, the convention of using American-made molasses as a sweetening agent became increasingly popular to avoid British taxes on sugar. Boston baked beans use a sauce prepared with molasses and salt pork, a dish whose popularity has given Boston the nickname “Beantown”.

Today, baked beans are served throughout the United States alongside barbecue foods and at picnics. Beans in a brown sugar, sugar, or corn syrup sauce (with or without tomatoes) are widely available throughout the United States. Bush Brothers are the largest producer. After the American Revolutionary War, Independence Day celebrations often included baked beans.

Canned baked beans are used as a convenience food; most are made from haricot beans (aka navy beans) in sauce. They may be eaten hot or cold, and straight from the can, as they are fully cooked. H. J. Heinz began producing canned baked beans in 1886. In the early 20th century, canned baked beans gained international popularity, particularly in the United Kingdom, where they have become a common part of an English full breakfast.

Three beanpots used for cooking homemade baked beans. The small one is glazed with the letters “Boston Baked Beans”

According to chef and food historian Walter Staib of Philadelphia’s City Tavern, baked beans had their roots as a Native peoples dish in the Americas long before the dish became known to Western culture. Native Americans mixed beans, maple sugar, and bear fat in earthenware pots which they placed in pits called “bean holes” which were lined in hot rocks to cook slowly over a long period of time.

British colonists in New England were the first westerners to adopt the dish from the Native peoples, and were quick to embrace it largely because the dish was reminiscent of pease porridge and because the dish used ingredients native to the New World. They substituted molasses or sugar for the maple syrup, bacon or ham for the bear fat, and simmered their beans for hours in pots over the fire instead of underground. Each colony in America had its own regional variations of the dish, with navy or white pea beans used in Massachusetts, Jacob’s Cattle and soldier beans used in Maine, and yellow-eyed beans in Vermont.[4] This variation likely resulted from the colonists receiving the dish from different Native peoples who used different native beans.

While some historians have theorized that baked beans had originated from the cassoulet or bean stew tradition in Southern France, this is unlikely as the beans used to make baked beans are all native to South America and were introduced to Europe around 1528. However, it is likely that English colonists used their knowledge of cassoulet cooking to modify the cooking technique of the beans from the traditional Native American version, by soaking the bean overnight and simmering the beans over a fire before baking it in earthen pots in order to decrease the cooking time.

A dish which was a clear precursor to baked beans, entitled “beans and bacon”, was known in medieval England. The addition of onion and mustard to some baked beans recipes published in New England in the 19th century was likely based on traditional cassoulet recipes from Staffordshire, England which utilized mustard, beans, and leeks. These ingredients are still often added to baked beans today. Nineteenth-century cookbooks published in New England, spread to other portions of the United States and Canada, which familiarized other people with the dish.

Beans on toast

While many recipes today are stewed, traditionally dried beans were soaked overnight, simmered until tender (parboiled), and then slow-baked in a ceramic or cast-iron beanpot. Originally baked beans were sweetened with maple syrup by Native Americans, a tradition some recipes still follow, but some English colonists modified the sweetening agent to brown sugar beginning in the 17th century. In the 18th century the convention of using American made molasses as a sweetening agent became increasingly popular in order to avoid British taxes on sugar. The molasses style of baked beans has become closely associated with the city of Boston and is often referred to as Boston baked beans.

Today in the New England region, baked beans are flavored either with maple syrup (Northern New England), or with molasses (Boston), and are traditionally cooked with salt pork in a beanpot in a brick oven for six to eight hours. In the absence of a brick oven, the beans were cooked in a beanpot nestled in a bed of embers placed near the outer edges of a hearth, about a foot away from the fire. Today, baked beans can be made in a slow cooker or in a modern oven using a traditional beanpot, Dutch oven, or casserole dish. The results of the dish, commonly described as having a savory-sweet flavor and a brownish- or reddish-tinted white bean, however, cooked are the same.

A tradition in Maine of “bean hole” cooking may have originated with the native Penobscot people and was later practiced in logging camps. A fire would be made in a stone-lined pit and allowed to burn down to hot coals, and then a pot with 11 pounds of seasoned beans would be placed in the ashes, covered over with dirt, and left to cook overnight or longer. These beans were a staple of Maine’s logging camps, served at every meal.

While baked beans was initially a New England region cuisine, the dish has become a popular item throughout the United States; and is now a staple item served most frequently along various types of barbecue and at picnics. This is due in part to the ease of handling, as they can be served hot or cold, directly from the can, making them handy for outdoor eating. The tomato-based sweet sauce also complements many types of barbecue. The already-cooked beans may also be baked in a casserole dish topped with slices of raw bacon, which is baked until the bacon is cooked. Additional seasonings are sometimes used, such as additional brown sugar or mustard to make the sauce more tangy.

 

A bowl of Beanie Weenies, also known as Franks and Beans or Beans and Wieners

Canned beans, often containing pork, were among the first convenience foods, and were exported and popularised by U.S. companies internationally in the early 20th century. The American Food and Drug Administration stated in 1996: “It has for years been recognized by consumers generally that the designation ‘beans with pork,’ or ‘pork and beans’ is the common or usual name for an article of commerce that contains very little pork.” The included pork is typically a piece of salt pork that adds fat to the dish.

The first mass-produced commercial canning of baked beans in the United States began in 1895 by the Pennsylvania-based H. J. Heinz Company. Heinz was also the first company to sell baked beans outside of the United States, beginning with sales limited solely to Fortnum & Mason in 1886, when the item was considered a luxury. They began selling baked beans throughout the UK in 1901, and baked beans became a standard part of the English full breakfast soon after. Heinz removed pork from the product during the Second World War rationing.

Originally, Heinz baked beans were prepared in the traditional United States manner for sales in Ireland and Great Britain. Over time, the recipe was altered to a less sweet tomato sauce without maple syrup, molasses, or brown sugar to appeal to the tastes of the United Kingdom. This is the version of baked beans most commonly eaten outside of the United States. Baked beans are commonly eaten on toast or as part of a full English, Scottish, or Irish breakfast.

Today, baked beans are a staple convenience food in the UK, often eaten as part of the modern full English breakfast and particularly on toast (called simply “beans on toast”). Heinz Baked Beans remains the best-selling brand in the UK. The Baked Bean Museum of Excellence in Port Talbot, Wales, is dedicated to baked beans.

 

In 2002, the British Dietetic Association allowed manufacturers of canned baked beans to advertise the product as contributing to the recommended daily consumption of five to six vegetables per person. This concession was criticized by heart specialists, who pointed to the high levels of sugar and salt in the product. However, it has been proven that consumption of baked beans does indeed lower total cholesterol levels and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, even in normo-cholesterolaemic individuals. Some manufacturers produce a “healthy” version of the product with reduced levels of sugar and salt.

Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Boston-Style Baked Beans

May 1, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is Boston-Style Baked Beans. This week’s side dish is made using Navy Beans, Bacon, Onion, Yellow Mustard, Splenda, and Molasses. The Dish is 140 calories and 16 net carbs. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Boston-Style Baked Beans
A delicious formula for rich and flavorful, diabetic-friendly Boston baked beans.

Recipe Ingredients:
4 (15-ounce) cans navy beans, undrained1/2 pound bacon, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
1/4 cup yellow mustard
1/3 cup Splenda® No Calorie Sweetener, Granular
2 tablespoons robust molasses

Cooking Directions:
1 – Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).
2 – Drain navy beans and reserve 1 1/4 cups liquid.
3 – Fry bacon in a large skillet until browned. Remove bacon and reserve half of the bacon fat.
4 – Fry onion in reserved bacon fat and cook until translucent. Stir in beans and remaining ingredients.
5 – Pour beans into a 3-quart baking dish.
6 – Bake for 45 minutes.
Makes 18 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/18 of recipe): Calories: 140 Calories from Fat: 25 Total Fat: 3g Saturated Fat: 1g Cholesterol: 5mg Sodium: 520mg Total Carbs: 21g Dietary Fiber: 5g Sugars: 3g Protein: 9g.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/boston-style_baked_beans_recipe.html

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – APPLESAUCE CAKE

April 28, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dessert of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is APPLESAUCE CAKE. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing All Purpose Flour, Baking Powder, Baking Soda, Cinnamon, Ginger, Reduced Calorie Margarine, Molasses, Egg Substitute, Vanilla Extract, Granulated Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, and Unsweetened Applesauce. There’s 170 calories and 23 net carbs per serving. So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

APPLESAUCE CAKE

Ingredients

1 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ginger
1/2 cup reduced-calorie margarine
1/4 cup molasses
1/2 cup egg substitute
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce

Directions

1 – Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Spray an 8×8 inch metal cake pan with vegetable cooking spray. In a small bowl, stir together flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and ginger. Set aside.
2 – In a large mixing bowl, beat margarine and molasses with an electric mixer on high speed for approximately 1 minute.
3 – Add egg substitute and vanilla and blend on high speed for 30 seconds. Mixture will be liquid.
4 – Add Splenda Granulated Sweetener and beat on medium speed until very smooth, approximately 1 1/2 minutes.
5 – Add flour mixture and applesauce and beat on low speed until mixed, approximately 45 seconds.
6 – Spread batter evenly into prepared pan and bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees F.

Recipe Yield: Yield: 8 servings Serving size: 1 slice.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 170
Fat: 7 grams
Saturated Fat: 1 grams
Fiber: 1 grams
Sodium: 260 milligrams
Protein: 4 grams
Carbohydrates: 24 grams
Sugars: 10 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/applesauce-cake

One of America’s Favorites – Barbecue in Texas

January 31, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A plate of South Texas-Style BBQ. Potato salad is common in Texas barbecue as a side dish.

Texas Barbecue refers to methods of preparation for barbecue unique to Texan cuisine. Beef brisket, pork ribs, and sausage are among the most commonly known dishes. The term can also include side dishes that are traditionally served alongside the smoked meats.

European meat-smoking traditions were brought to Central Texas by German and Czech settlers during the mid-19th century. Traditionally, butchers would smoke the leftover meat that had not been sold, allowing it to be stored longer without spoiling. As these leftovers became popular among the migrants in the area, multiple meat markets began to specialize in smoked meats.

In 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson hosted a state dinner featuring barbecue for the Mexican president-elect in Johnson City, Texas. This was the first barbecue state dinner in the history of the United States.

In 2019, J. C. Reid of the Houston Chronicle wrote that pulled pork barbecue was becoming common in Texas despite having originated in a different region.

Texas barbecue traditions differ geographically and culturally: East Texas, Central Texas, South Texas, and West Texas each have their own unique barbecue styles. Of these various styles, the Central and East Texas varieties are considered to be the most well-known.

The different kinds of Texas barbecue can be distinguished as follows:

* East Texas style—the meat is slowly cooked to the point that it is “falling off the bone.” It is typically cooked over hickory wood and marinated in a sweet, tomato-based sauce.
* Central Texas style—the meat is typically rubbed with only salt and black pepper (though some restaurants have been known to use other spices), then cooked over indirect heat from pecan, oak, or mesquite wood. Sauce is typically considered unnecessary, but it may be served on the side to complement the meat.
* West Texas style—the meat is cooked over direct heat from mesquite wood in a method very similar to grilling.
* South Texas style—the meat is marinated in thick, molasses-like sauces that keep the meat moist after cooking.
Another style of barbecue, barbacoa, is characteristic of South Texas and the Rio Grande valley near the Mexico–United States border.

Barbacoa is a traditional Mexican form of barbecue that typically uses goat, lamb, or sheep meat, although beef is also sometimes used. In its most authentic form, barbacoa is prepared in a hole dug in the ground and covered in maguey (Agave Americana) leaves.

Smoked baby back pork ribs

* East Texas
East Texas barbecue is usually chopped rather than sliced. It may be made of either beef or pork. It is usually served on a bun.

In “Texas Barbecue in Black and White,” Robb Walsh writes that African-American varieties of barbecue in East Texas favored beef rather than pork due to its prevalence in the region. Walsh quotes an artist, Bert Long, who states that African-American varieties are heavily smoked.

According to Reid, the presence of pork ribs in East Texas barbecue originated from elsewhere in the South. According to Walsh, the origins date back to when barbecues were held for slaves. Many Black restaurant owners, in 1910, struggled as food-safety regulations passed throughout Texas restricted the operation of their restaurants. Later on, the widespread implementation of a new innovation, the cinder block pit, allowed Black restaurateurs to serve their fellow Black customers.

In a 1973 Texas Monthly article, Griffin Smith, Jr. describes East Texas barbecue as an “extension” of barbecue served in the Southern United States and says that beef and pork appear equally in the cuisine. According to Smith, the style’s emphasis on sauces and spices originated from a time when African-Americans received poor-quality cuts of meat that needed flavoring. According to Smith, the “finest manifestations” of this style were found in African-American-operated restaurants. Smith further describes East Texas barbecue as “…a chopped pork sandwich with hot sauce…”

* Central Texas
The Central Texas pit-style barbecue was established in the 19th century along the Chisholm Trail in the towns of Lockhart, Luling, and Taylor. European immigrants, who owned meat-packing plants, opened retail meat markets serving cooked meats wrapped in red butcher paper. This is an ongoing tradition in many Central Texas towns. This barbecue style’s popularity has spread considerably around the world, especially to Southern California, New York City, Britain, and Australia.

At a typical Central Texas pit-style barbecue restaurant, customers take a cafeteria-style tray and are served by a butcher who carves the meat by weight. Barbecue meats are commonly sold by the pound.

Next, side dishes and desserts including slices of white bread, crinkle-cut dill pickle chips, sliced onion, jalapeño, and corn bread are picked up along the line.

This style of barbecue emphasizes the meat, so if sauce is available, it is usually considered a side to dip into. Calvin Trillin, writing in The New Yorker, said that discussions of Central Texas pit barbecue do not concern the piquancy of the sauces or common side dishes and desserts—the main consideration is the quality of the cooking of the meats.

Smith argues that the lack of focus on sauces is due to the fact that noon meat markets were once dominated by upper-class purchasers who could choose from the highest quality cuts of meat and had little interest in sauces.

Pulled Pork

He also states that many sauces in Central Texas pit barbecue are intentionally made “bland” in comparison to the flavor of the meats themselves. The sauce is typically thinner and unsweetened, as opposed to the Kansas City and Memphis styles, which rely heavily on molasses, sugar, and corn syrup to provide thickness and sweetness.

In 2010, Jayne Clark of USA Today described the “Texas Barbecue Trail”, an East-of-Austin “semi-loop” including Elgin, Lockhart, Luling, and Taylor. Barbecue eateries in this semi-loop, such as Louie Mueller Barbecue, are within an hour from Austin running from northeast to the southeast.

* Other styles
West Texas barbecue, sometimes called “cowboy style,” traditionally uses a more direct heating method than other styles. Food is generally cooked over mesquite, granting it a distinct, smoky flavor that is different from other wood-smoked styles.

Barbecue in the border area between the South Texas Plains and Northern Mexico is mostly influenced by Mexican cuisine. Historically, this area was the birthplace of the Texas ranching tradition. Often, Mexican farmhands were partially paid for their work with less-desirable cuts of meat, such as the diaphragm and the cow’s head. It is the cow’s head that defines South Texas barbecue (called barbacoa). The head would be wrapped in wet maguey leaves and buried in a pit with hot coals for several hours, after which the meat would be pulled off for barbacoa tacos. The tongue would also be used to make lengua tacos. Today, this barbecue is mostly cooked in an oven in a bain-marie.

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Chocolate Gingerbread Cookies

December 16, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is some Chocolate Gingerbread Cookies. ‘Tis the Season for Chocolate Gingerbread Cookies. To make these Cookies some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are All Purpose Flour, Unsweetened Cocoa Powder, Ground Ginger, Ground Cinnamon, Light Brown Sugar, Molasses, Egg and more! The Cookies are 59 calories and 7 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Chocolate Gingerbread Cookies
These delightful, low-carb cookies combine spicy gingerbread with rich chocolate for a combination that’s sure to become a festive favorite. Use holiday-themed cookie cutters to create fun designs, or try our modified Chewy Chocolate Gingerbread Drops recipe for bite-sized treats.

Ingredients
2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
2 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon finely ground black pepper
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, softened
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon shortening
4 squares (1 ounce each) semisweet chocolate, melted and cooled
2 tablespoons molasses
1 egg
White decorating icing (optional)

Directions
Yield: About 2 dozen cookies
Serving size: 1 cookie

1 – Combine flour, cocoa, ginger, baking soda, cinnamon, salt, and pepper in medium bowl. Beat butter, brown sugar, granulated sugar, and shortening in large bowl with electric mixer at medium speed until creamy. Add chocolate; beat until blended. Add molasses and egg; beat until well blended.

2 – Gradually add flour mixture, beating until well blended. Divide dough in half. Shape each half into disc; wrap each disc tightly in plastic wrap. Refrigerate at least 1 hour.

3 – Preheat oven to 350°F. Roll out 1 disc of dough between sheets of plastic wrap to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut out shapes with 5-inch cookie cutters; place cutouts on ungreased cookie sheets. Refrigerate at least 15 minutes. Repeat with remaining dough.

4 – Bake 8 to 10 minutes or until cookies are set. Cool on cookie sheets 5 minutes. Remove to wire racks to cool completely. Decorate with icing, if desired.

* Chewy Chocolate Gingerbread Drops: Decrease flour to 1 3/4 cups. Shape 1 1/2 teaspoonfuls of dough into balls. Place on ungreased cookie sheets. Flatten balls slightly. Do not refrigerate before baking. Bake as directed. Makes about 4 1/2 dozen cookies.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 59 calories, Carbohydrates: 8 g, Protein: 1 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Cholesterol: 9 mg, Sodium: 20 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/snack/chocolate-gingerbread-cookies/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Upside-Down Pineapple Cake

November 4, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is – Upside-Down Pineapple Cake. Upside-Down Pineapple Cake just made healthier. To make this week’s Dessert you’ll be needing Pineapple Slices, Mo lasses, Ground Cinnamon, Brown Sugar Substitute, Margarine, Egg Whites, Vanilla, All Purpose Flour, and Baking Soda. There’s 165 calories and 27 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Upside-Down Pineapple Cake
Ingredients

1 can (15 ounces) pineapple slices in juice
2 tablespoons molasses
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup sucralose-based brown sugar substitute
1/4 cup margarine, melted
2 egg whites
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda

Directions
Yield: 12 servings.
Serving size: 1/12 of cake.

1 – Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray 9-inch round cake pan with nonstick cooking spray.

2 – Drain pineapple; reserve 3/4 cup juice. Place pineapple rings evenly in bottom of prepared pan. Drizzle molasses evenly over pineapple. Sprinkle with cinnamon.

3 – Beat sugar substitute, margarine, egg whites, and vanilla in large bowl with electric mixer at low speed until well blended. Add reserved pineapple juice, flour and baking soda; beat until smooth. Pour batter over pineapple.

4 – Bake 30 minutes or until toothpick inserted into center comes out clean. Cool in pan on wire rack. Store leftovers in refrigerator.

Tip: For maximum flavor, let cake sit overnight before serving.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 165 calories, Carbohydrates: 28 g, Protein: 1 g, Fat: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 108 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/upside-pineapple-cake/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Wholesome Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Bars

October 21, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is a Wholesome Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Bars. Sugar Substitute, Spices, Molasses, Reduced Fat Cream Cheese, and Chocolate Chips are just some of the ingredients you’ll be needing to make this week’s recipe. There’s 110 calories and 13 net carbs per serving! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Wholesome Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Bars

One taste of these delightful, low-carb bars and you’ll never look at chocolate chips the same way. Adults and kids alike will be clamoring for these sweet treats once they make their appearance on the dessert table.

Ingredients
1 cup white whole wheat flour
1 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 cup sugar substitute*
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1 can (15 ounces) solid packed pumpkin
2 large eggs
1/4 cup canola oil
1 container (2 1/2 ounces) puréed baby food prunes
2 tablespoons molasses
2 tablespoons packed brown sugar
4 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese
4 ounces nonfat cream cheese
2 tablespoons sugar substitute*
1/2 cup reduced-fat whipped topping
6 tablespoons mini chocolate chips

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 350°F. Coat 13×9-inch pan with nonstick baking spray.

2 – In medium bowl mix together flours, 3/4 cup sugar substitute, baking powder, baking soda, and spices.

3 – In large bowl stir together pumpkin, eggs, oil, prune purée, molasses, and brown sugar. Mix in flour mixture and stir just until combined.

4 – Spoon into pan, smooth, and bake 20 to 25 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool on rack.

5 – In small bowl beat together cream cheeses and 2 tablespoons sugar substitute. Beat in whipped topping. Spread frosting onto cooled cake and top with chocolate chips. Cut into 24 squares.

*This recipe was tested using sucralose-based sugar substitute.

Yield: 24 servings.

Serving size: 1 square.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 110 calories, Carbohydrates: 15 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 20 mg, Sodium: 170 mg, Fiber: 2 g

Exchanges per serving: 1 Bread/Starch, 1/2 Fat.
https://beatcancer2010.wordpress.com/?s=Wholesome+Chocolate+Chip+Pumpkin+Bars

Subscribe
Diabetes Self-Management offers up-to-date, practical “how-to” information on nutrition, exercise, new drugs, medical advances, self-help, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.
Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

APPLE AND SQUASH BAKE

September 12, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I have a recipe for an APPLE AND SQUASH BAKE. A perfect Fall Dish using both Apples and Butternut Squash. To make this Dish you’ll be needing Granulated Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Molasses, Light Butter, All Purpose Flour, Salt, Granulated Mace, Butternut Squash, and Large Apples. The Dish is only 120 calories and 20 net carbs per serving. So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

APPLE AND SQUASH BAKE
This recipe combines all the best fall flavors and makes a great alternative to the candied yams often served for Thanksgiving dinner.
Yield: 8 servings
Serving Size: 3/4 cup squash and apple bake

Ingredients

1/3 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1 teaspoon molasses
1/4 cup light butter
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground mace
2 pounds butternut squash – peeled, seeded, and cut into
1/2 inch slices
2 large apples – cored, and cut into 1/2 inch slices

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
In a medium bowl, stir together Splenda Granulated Sweetener, molasses, butter, flour, salt, and mace. Arrange squash in an ungreased 9×13 inch baking dish. Top with slices of apple, then sprinkle with the sugar mixture. Cover with a lid or aluminum foil.
Bake for 50 to 60 minutes in the preheated oven, or until squash is tender.

Nutritional Information (Per Serving)
Calories: 120
Calories from Fat: 30
Protein: 2 g
Sodium: 340 mg
Cholesterol: 10 mg
Fat: 3.5 g
Saturated Fat: 2 g
Dietary Fiber: 4 g
Sugars: 9 g
Carbohydrates: 24 g
https://diabeticgourmet.com/articles/10-diabetic-friendly-apple-recipes-to-celebrate-autumn/

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Zaza Chef

Cook. Eat. Repeat.

Sincerely, Cabra.

The public, social feed of Jaime Cabra

Mayuri's Jikoni

Where meals and memories are made.

Middle School Foodie

A website with recipes and restaurant reviews, written by a kid.

Kit's Kitchen

Simple Healthy Recipes

Gibson Family Recipes

RECIPES AND TIPS FROM FAMILY & FRIENDS

vegetariAnne

“Nothing will benefit health or increase chances of survival on earth as the evolution to a vegetarian diet.” — Albert Einstein

truefoodfeed

FOOD AND NUTRITION: THE SIMPLE TRUTH

A Journey to Healing

Navigating my lifelong journey towards healing

Skinny Kitchen Secrets

Gourmet Weight Watchers Recipes for the Discerning Dieter

Recipe Lord

All about delicious food

Jean and Tonic

a food and lifestyle blog