Diabetic Dish of the Week – Roast Leg of Lamb

December 22, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is Roast Leg of Lamb. To make this week’s Dish you’ll be needing Coarse Grain Mustard, Garlic Cloves, Dried Rosemary, Black Pepper, Leg of Lamb, and Mint Jelly. The Leg of Lamb is 172 calories and 0 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Roast Leg of Lamb
This succulent roast serves as a beautiful centerpiece for your Easter table. This classic recipe can also be prepared up to 24 hours before roasting, freeing up your day for all your other seasonal chores.

Ingredients
3 tablespoons coarse-grain mustard
2 cloves garlic, minced*
1 1/2 teaspoons dried rosemary, crushed
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 leg of lamb, well trimmed, boned, rolled and tied (about 4 pounds)
Mint jelly (optional)

Directions
Yield: 10 servings
Serving size: 2 lamb slices (without mint jelly)

1 – Combine mustard, garlic, rosemary, and pepper. Rub mustard mixture over lamb. Place roast on meat rack in foil-lined shallow roasting pan.** Preheat oven to 400°F. Roast 15 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325°F; roast about 20 minutes per pound for medium or until internal temperature reaches 145°F when tested with meat thermometer inserted into thickest part of roast.

2 – Transfer roast to cutting board; cover with foil. Let stand 10 to 15 minutes before carving. Internal temperature will continue to rise 5°F to 10°F during stand time.

3 – Cut strings from roast; discard. Carve into 20 slices. Serve with mint jelly, if desired.

*Note. For a more intense garlic flavor inside the meat, cut garlic into slivers. Cut small pockets at random intervals throughout roast with the tip of a sharp knife; insert the garlic slivers.

**Note. At this point the lamb may be covered and refrigerated up to 24 hours before roasting.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/roast-leg-lamb/

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 172 calories, Carbohydrates: 1 g, Protein: 25 g, Fat: 7 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Cholesterol: 78 mg, Sodium: 121 mg, Fiber: 1 g

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

Herb and Spice of the Week – Mentha (Mint)

December 25, 2014 at 6:42 AM | Posted in Herb and Spice of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,
Mint leaves

Mint leaves

Mentha (also known as mint, from Greek míntha, Linear B mi-ta) is a genus of plants in the family Lamiaceae (mint family). The species are not clearly distinct and estimates of the number of species varies from 13 to 18. Hybridization between some of the species occurs naturally. Many other hybrids, as well as numerous cultivars, are known in cultivation.

The genus has a subcosmopolitan distribution across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, and North America.

Mints are aromatic, almost exclusively perennial, rarely annual, herbs. They have wide-spreading underground and overground stolons and erect, square, branched stems. The leaves are arranged in opposite pairs, from oblong to lanceolate, often downy, and with a serrated margin. Leaf colors range from dark green and gray-green to purple, blue, and sometimes pale yellow. The flowers are white to purple and produced in false whorls called verticillasters. The corolla is two-lipped with four subequal lobes, the upper lobe usually the largest. The fruit is a nutlet, containing one to four seeds.

While the species that make up the Mentha genus are widely distributed and can be found in many environments, most grow best in wet environments and moist soils. Mints will grow 10–120 cm tall and can spread over an indeterminate area. Due to their tendency to spread unchecked, some mints are considered invasive.

 

 
All mints thrive near pools of water, lakes, rivers, and cool moist spots in partial shade. In general, mints tolerate a wide range of conditions, and can also be grown in full sun. Mint grows all year round.

They are fast-growing, extending their reach along surfaces through a network of runners. Due to their speedy growth, one plant of each desired mint, along with a little care, will provide more than enough mint for home use. Some mint species are more invasive than others. Even with the less invasive mints, care should be taken when mixing any mint with any other plants, lest the mint take over. To control mints in an open environment, they should be planted in deep, bottomless containers sunk in the ground, or planted above ground in tubs and barrels.

Some mints can be propagated by seed, but growth from seed can be an unreliable method for raising mint for two reasons: mint seeds are highly variable – one might not end up with what one presupposed was planted, and some mint varieties are sterile. It is more effective to take and plant cuttings from the runners of healthy mints.

The most common and popular mints for cultivation are peppermint (Mentha × piperita), spearmint (Mentha spicata), and (more recently) apple mint (Mentha suaveolens).

Mints are supposed to make good companion plants, repelling pesty insects and attracting beneficial ones. They are susceptible to whitefly and aphids.

Harvesting of mint leaves can be done at any time. Fresh leaves should be used immediately or stored up to a few days in plastic bags in a refrigerator. Optionally, leaves can be frozen in ice cube trays. Dried mint leaves should be stored in an airtight container placed in a cool, dark, dry area.

 

 

 

 

A jar of mint jelly

A jar of mint jelly

The leaf, fresh or dried, is the culinary source of mint. Fresh mint is usually preferred over dried mint when storage of the mint is not a problem. The leaves have a warm, fresh, aromatic, sweet flavor with a cool aftertaste, and are used in teas, beverages, jellies, syrups, candies, and ice creams. In Middle Eastern cuisine, mint is used on lamb dishes, while in British cuisine and American cuisine, mint sauce and mint jelly are used, respectively.

Mint is a necessary ingredient in Touareg tea, a popular tea in northern African and Arab countries. Alcoholic drinks sometimes feature mint for flavor or garnish, such as the mint julep and the mojito. Crème de menthe is a mint-flavored liqueur used in drinks such as the grasshopper.

Mint essential oil and menthol are extensively used as flavorings in breath fresheners, drinks, antiseptic mouth rinses, toothpaste, chewing gum, desserts, and candies, such as mint (candy) and mint chocolate. The substances that give the mints their characteristic aromas and flavors are menthol (the main aroma of peppermint and Japanese peppermint) and pulegone (in pennyroyal and Corsican mint). The compound primarily responsible for the aroma and flavor of spearmint is L-carvone.

Mints are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species, including buff ermine moths.

 

 

 
Mint was originally used as a medicinal herb to treat stomach ache and chest pains. There are several uses in traditional medicine and preliminary research for possible use in treating irritable bowel syndrome.

Menthol from mint essential oil (40–90%) is an ingredient of many cosmetics and some perfumes. Menthol and mint essential oil are also used in aromatherapy which may have clinical use to alleviate post-surgery nausea.

 

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Midwest mattie

just living my best life in the midwest.

Justine Snacks

eat what you want

Bake on Through to the Other Side

Chronicling my attempt to bake and cook through my extensive recipe collection.

Beki's list of lists

an oversharer, problem solver making lists about anything and everything!

THINKING A BAO FOOD

EASY + HEALTHY(ISH) + DELICIOUS + FOOD RECIPES

Non-Harm City

Elevated eating

Little Girl, Big Eats

I may seem small, but my appetite is huge!

At Home with Pearl

Sharing my passion at home - cooking, baking, home style, and more.

A Likes Applesauce:

Easy and delicious recipes.. for those of us that don’t particularly like cooking

Little Miss Made from Scratch

My Favorite Recipes!

A Year of Potatoes

Explorations in Potatoes

marycapelle.wordpress.com/

Naturopathe - Créatrice de recettes Healthy

Mel's Healthful Eats

Recipes & Wellness

cozebakes

Bake with Love